Successful Fine Craft Marketing

 

Turn your artistic craft skills into a full- or part-time business. Everything you need to know to sell your handmade crafts is here!

 

This book is a collection of the best from our other books.  It includes the following:

* A guide to selling your crafts directly to the public at crafts fairs and art shows, selling wholesale to galleries, and marketing on the internet.

* 200 tips for finding and getting into craft shows and how to survive them and make money. Learn about taking credit cards, safety on the road, making your own display and anchoring it, selling, avoiding theft, travelling to shows by road or air, making your own web site, and doing your own photography for web images and show application slides.

* 900 of the best craft fairs and art shows in the U.S.

* Contact information for everything from canopies and display cases to trade shows, photographers, craft fair guides, and credit card providers, including over 100 show promoters who produce multiple shows around the country.

 

The author has been a professional craftsperson for 30 years. In the past 16 years he has participated in over 300 art shows and craft fairs in 28 states. He currently has his crafts in 25 galleries and sells his craft products on several web sites he designed and maintains. He has written 5 books on craft marketing.

 

 

This 172 page book  will be mailed to you for $19.95 plus $4.95 for Priority Mail postage and delivery confirmation. Click on the button to order with your credit card through PayPal or with money in your PayPal account. This is a secure transaction with encrypted HTML.

`

 

 

 

 

Successful Craft Marketing

 

The Complete Guide to Selling at Shows, to Stores, and Online

 

 

 

by A. B. Petrow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Published by CraftMastersTM Books

Sebastopol, California

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CopyrightÓ 2007  By A. B. Petrow

 

 

All rights reserved.  No part of this book shall be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, except for the inclusion of brief quotations in review, without permission in writing from the publisher.

 

DISCLAIMER

This publication and accompanying software are designed to provide accurate and authoritative information with regard to the subject matter covered. It is sold with the understanding that the Publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting, or other professional advice. If legal advice or other expert assistance is required, the services of a competent professional person should be sought.

--From a Declaration of Principles jointly adopted by a Committee of the American Bar Association and a Committee of Publishers and Associations.

 

Every effort has been made to make this book as complete and as accurate as possible, but no warranty or fitness is implied.  Neither the author nor Craftmasters Books, nor anyone else who has been involved in the creation, production, or delivery of this product shall be liable for any direct, incidental or consequential damages, such as, but not limited to, loss of anticipated profits or benefits, resulting from its use or from any breach of any warranty. Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of direct, incidental or consequential damages so the above limitation may not apply to you.

 

Windows is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation. All other product and brand names mentioned in this publication are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective holders.

 

Craftmasters Books

P. O. Box 1655

Sebastopol, CA 95473

 

ISBN-13: 978-0-9655193-3-5

ISBN-10: 0-9655193-3-3

 

Cover photos (counter-clockwise from top)—1. Christopher Cantwell-ACC Baltimore, MD  2. ACAC-Lincoln Center NYC, NY,  3. American Craft Festivals-San Diego, CA,

4. Raku Pottery by Lynn Dee, Contemporary Crafts Marketplace, San Francisco, CA  5. Three Rivers Arts Festival, Pittsburgh, PA

 

Printed in USA by printingsystem.com

Photographs: A. B. Petrow

Illustrations: Rhonda Libby (saint1276@yahoo.com)

 

 

 

 

 

          Table of Contents

 

INTRODUCTION 6

CRAFT FAIRS AND ART SHOWS 7

WHAT IS A CRAFT FAIR? 7

TYPES OF FAIRS 7

FIRST, YOU NEED A PRODUCT 8

CRAFT SHOW MYTHS 8

HOW TO FIND OUT WHERE THE FAIRS ARE 8

TIPS FOR FINDING A SHOW 9

LOCALIZED CRAFT FAIR GUIDES 9

LIST OF CRAFT FAIR GUIDES 10

HOW TO CHOOSE A GOOD FAIR 11

THE APPLICATION PROCESS 11

READ AND COMPLETE THE APPLICATION 11

WHAT IS THE JURY LOOKING FOR? 12

SLIDES 12

PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS 13

BOOTH SHOTS 16

ZAPPLICATION 17

GET THE APPLICATION IN ON TIME 18

TIPS FOR GETTING INTO THE SHOW 18

PLANNING YOUR BOOTH 19

INDOOR BOOTHS 19

LIGHTING 20

OUTDOOR BOOTHS 21

CITY STREETS 23

GRASSY PARKS 23

IN A LARGE TENT 24

WEATHER 24

MORE TIPS FOR OUTDOOR SHOWS, WEIGHTS AND WEATHER 25

BANNERS, BOOTH SIGNS, AND PHOTOS 27

MORE DISPLAY IDEAS 28

PACKAGING 29

TAKING VISA AND MASTERCARD 30

PORTABLE CREDIT CARD TERMINALS 31

TIPS FOR TAKING CREDIT CARDS 31

SALES TECHNIQUES 32

SELLING TIPS 34

ON THE ROAD 35

TRAVEL TIPS 36

SECURITY ON THE ROAD 37

FLYING TO CRAFT FAIRS 38

FLYING TIPS 39

HOW TO INCREASE PROFITS 40

MORE CRAFT FAIR TIPS 41

BEFORE THE SHOW 41

SETTING UP FOR THE SHOW 42

DURING THE SHOW 42

AVOIDING THEFT 44

HEALTH 45

LIST OF PROMOTERS OF MULTIPLE CRAFT SHOWS 46

SELLING TO STORES AND GALLERIES 50

WHOLESALE MARKETING 51

TRADE SHOW PRODUCERS 52

WHOLESALE TIPS 53

TRADE SHOWS 53

DURING THE TRADE SHOW 54

WHOLESALE BUSINESS 55

WHOLESALE REPS 56

MORE WHOLESALE TIPS 57

OTHER MARKETS 57

SELLING ONLINE 59

INTERNET TIPS 60

MAKING YOUR OWN WEB SITE 60

SELLING ON EBAY 63

GENERAL BUSINESS AND MARKETING TIPS 64

BOOKKEEPING 64

TAXES 65

COPYRIGHT 66

PROMOTION 66

PRICING 67

MISCELLANEOUS 68

USEFUL ADDRESSES 69

DISPLAY 69

PHOTOGRAPHY 69

BAGS AND BOXES 70

INSURANCE 70

CREDIT CARD PROCESSING SYSTEMS 70

COMPUTERS AND MICROSOFTTM OFFICE 71

INTRODUCTION 71

DIFFERENT MICROSOFT OFFICE CONFIGURATIONS 71

BASIC COMPUTER REQUIREMENTS 72

WHAT IS WORD PROCESSING? 73

WHAT ARE SPREADSHEETS? 73

SPREADSHEET LESSON 74

INSTALLING “MARKETING SPREADSHEETS 74

USING THE “MARKETING SPREADSHEETSFOLDER 75

CRAFT PRICING (PRICING.XLS) 76

CRAFT FAIR APPLICATION ORGANIZER (ORGANIZER.XLS) 78

SHOW EXPENSE REPORT (EXPENSES.XLS) 84

CUSTOMER  MAILING LIST (CUSTOMER.XLS) 86

TRADE SHOW EXPENSES (TRADE SHOW.XLS) 88

SALES REP. AGREEMENT (REPAGREEMENT.DOC) 90

CRAFT GALLERY DATABASE (GALLERY LIST.XLS) 92

CONSIGNMENT AGREEMENT (CONSIGNMENT.DOC) 96

MONTHLY ACCOUNTING SYSTEM (BOOKKEEPING.XLS) 98

INVOICE (INVOICE.XLS) 100

BUSINESS PLAN (BUSINESS PLAN.DOC) 102

INVENTORY (INVENTORY.XLS) 104

MARKETING PLAN (MARKETING PLAN.XLS) 106

PRESS RELEASE (PRESS RELEASE.DOC) 108

LETTERHEADS (LETTERHEADS.DOC) 110

RESUME (RESUME.DOC) 114

HOW TO USE MICROSOFT PUBLISHER 116

TOP 900 CRAFT FAIRS AND ART SHOWS IN THE UNITED STATES 118

TOP 1,100 CRAFT GALLERIES IN THE UNITED STATES 142

ABOUT THE “SUCCESSFUL CRAFT MARKETING” CD 166

USING THE 8-PAGE FRONTPAGE WEB SITE ON THE DISK. 166

CONCLUSION 168

ORDER FORM 169

INDEX 170

 

Introduction

Over the years at craft fairs and art shows, many people have approached me with questions about how to get started selling their own craft creations. Frequently asked questions include: How do you find out about where and when the shows are? How do you get into the shows? Why are some people admitted and others not? Where did you get your canopy and tables? Can I make a good living doing this? How do I get stores to sell my work? Can I use the internet to make money?

 

With this book you have all the information you need about how and where to sell what you make at art shows and craft fairs, to stores and galleries, and on the internet. Everything you need to successfully sell your crafts is here, except for the irrestable handmade products and tons of self-discipline, which you provide.

 

This book consists of the best of  my previous books 500 Tips for Marketing Your Crafts, How and Where to Sell Your Craft Creations, and Microsoft Office for Artists and Craftspeople. I have included the entire list of the best 900 shows in the country.  In addition, for the first time, I have included a CD-Rom with the mailing list of the best 1,000 craft galleries, an 8-page web site ready for your text and photos, hundreds of fonts and thousands of clip art, as well as all of the forms and templates in the book. This information contained here has helped me to sell over 2 million dollars worth of craft products over the last 30 years. My intention is that you to have even more success than I have, by  having much more information than I started with, in one complete resource.

 

 

 

 

Three Rivers Arts Festival, Pittsburgh, PA

`

 

 

 

 

Successful Craft Marketing

 

The Complete Guide to Selling at Shows, to Stores, and Online

 

 

 

by A. B. Petrow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Published by CraftMastersTM Books

Sebastopol, California

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CopyrightÓ 2007  By A. B. Petrow

 

 

All rights reserved.  No part of this book shall be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, except for the inclusion of brief quotations in review, without permission in writing from the publisher.

 

DISCLAIMER

This publication and accompanying software are designed to provide accurate and authoritative information with regard to the subject matter covered. It is sold with the understanding that the Publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting, or other professional advice. If legal advice or other expert assistance is required, the services of a competent professional person should be sought.

--From a Declaration of Principles jointly adopted by a Committee of the American Bar Association and a Committee of Publishers and Associations.

 

Every effort has been made to make this book as complete and as accurate as possible, but no warranty or fitness is implied.  Neither the author nor Craftmasters Books, nor anyone else who has been involved in the creation, production, or delivery of this product shall be liable for any direct, incidental or consequential damages, such as, but not limited to, loss of anticipated profits or benefits, resulting from its use or from any breach of any warranty. Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of direct, incidental or consequential damages so the above limitation may not apply to you.

 

Windows is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation. All other product and brand names mentioned in this publication are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective holders.

 

Craftmasters Books

P. O. Box 1655

Sebastopol, CA 95473

 

ISBN-13: 978-0-9655193-3-5

ISBN-10: 0-9655193-3-3

 

Cover photos (counter-clockwise from top)—1. Christopher Cantwell-ACC Baltimore, MD  2. ACAC-Lincoln Center NYC, NY,  3. American Craft Festivals-San Diego, CA,

4. Raku Pottery by Lynn Dee, Contemporary Crafts Marketplace, San Francisco, CA  5. Three Rivers Arts Festival, Pittsburgh, PA

 

Printed in USA by printingsystem.com

Photographs: A. B. Petrow

Illustrations: Rhonda Libby (saint1276@yahoo.com)

 

 

 

 

 

          Table of Contents

 

INTRODUCTION 6

CRAFT FAIRS AND ART SHOWS 7

WHAT IS A CRAFT FAIR? 7

TYPES OF FAIRS 7

FIRST, YOU NEED A PRODUCT 8

CRAFT SHOW MYTHS 8

HOW TO FIND OUT WHERE THE FAIRS ARE 8

TIPS FOR FINDING A SHOW 9

LOCALIZED CRAFT FAIR GUIDES 9

LIST OF CRAFT FAIR GUIDES 10

HOW TO CHOOSE A GOOD FAIR 11

THE APPLICATION PROCESS 11

READ AND COMPLETE THE APPLICATION 11

WHAT IS THE JURY LOOKING FOR? 12

SLIDES 12

PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS 13

BOOTH SHOTS 16

ZAPPLICATION 17

GET THE APPLICATION IN ON TIME 18

TIPS FOR GETTING INTO THE SHOW 18

PLANNING YOUR BOOTH 19

INDOOR BOOTHS 19

LIGHTING 20

OUTDOOR BOOTHS 21

CITY STREETS 23

GRASSY PARKS 23

IN A LARGE TENT 24

WEATHER 24

MORE TIPS FOR OUTDOOR SHOWS, WEIGHTS AND WEATHER 25

BANNERS, BOOTH SIGNS, AND PHOTOS 27

MORE DISPLAY IDEAS 28

PACKAGING 29

TAKING VISA AND MASTERCARD 30

PORTABLE CREDIT CARD TERMINALS 31

TIPS FOR TAKING CREDIT CARDS 31

SALES TECHNIQUES 32

SELLING TIPS 34

ON THE ROAD 35

TRAVEL TIPS 36

SECURITY ON THE ROAD 37

FLYING TO CRAFT FAIRS 38

FLYING TIPS 39

HOW TO INCREASE PROFITS 40

MORE CRAFT FAIR TIPS 41

BEFORE THE SHOW 41

SETTING UP FOR THE SHOW 42

DURING THE SHOW 42

AVOIDING THEFT 44

HEALTH 45

LIST OF PROMOTERS OF MULTIPLE CRAFT SHOWS 46

SELLING TO STORES AND GALLERIES 50

WHOLESALE MARKETING 51

TRADE SHOW PRODUCERS 52

WHOLESALE TIPS 53

TRADE SHOWS 53

DURING THE TRADE SHOW 54

WHOLESALE BUSINESS 55

WHOLESALE REPS 56

MORE WHOLESALE TIPS 57

OTHER MARKETS 57

SELLING ONLINE 59

INTERNET TIPS 60

MAKING YOUR OWN WEB SITE 60

SELLING ON EBAY 63

GENERAL BUSINESS AND MARKETING TIPS 64

BOOKKEEPING 64

TAXES 65

COPYRIGHT 66

PROMOTION 66

PRICING 67

MISCELLANEOUS 68

USEFUL ADDRESSES 69

DISPLAY 69

PHOTOGRAPHY 69

BAGS AND BOXES 70

INSURANCE 70

CREDIT CARD PROCESSING SYSTEMS 70

COMPUTERS AND MICROSOFTTM OFFICE 71

INTRODUCTION 71

DIFFERENT MICROSOFT OFFICE CONFIGURATIONS 71

BASIC COMPUTER REQUIREMENTS 72

WHAT IS WORD PROCESSING? 73

WHAT ARE SPREADSHEETS? 73

SPREADSHEET LESSON 74

INSTALLING “MARKETING SPREADSHEETS 74

USING THE “MARKETING SPREADSHEETSFOLDER 75

CRAFT PRICING (PRICING.XLS) 76

CRAFT FAIR APPLICATION ORGANIZER (ORGANIZER.XLS) 78

SHOW EXPENSE REPORT (EXPENSES.XLS) 84

CUSTOMER  MAILING LIST (CUSTOMER.XLS) 86

TRADE SHOW EXPENSES (TRADE SHOW.XLS) 88

SALES REP. AGREEMENT (REPAGREEMENT.DOC) 90

CRAFT GALLERY DATABASE (GALLERY LIST.XLS) 92

CONSIGNMENT AGREEMENT (CONSIGNMENT.DOC) 96

MONTHLY ACCOUNTING SYSTEM (BOOKKEEPING.XLS) 98

INVOICE (INVOICE.XLS) 100

BUSINESS PLAN (BUSINESS PLAN.DOC) 102

INVENTORY (INVENTORY.XLS) 104

MARKETING PLAN (MARKETING PLAN.XLS) 106

PRESS RELEASE (PRESS RELEASE.DOC) 108

LETTERHEADS (LETTERHEADS.DOC) 110

RESUME (RESUME.DOC) 114

HOW TO USE MICROSOFT PUBLISHER 116

TOP 900 CRAFT FAIRS AND ART SHOWS IN THE UNITED STATES 118

TOP 1,100 CRAFT GALLERIES IN THE UNITED STATES 142

ABOUT THE “SUCCESSFUL CRAFT MARKETING” CD 166

USING THE 8-PAGE FRONTPAGE WEB SITE ON THE DISK. 166

CONCLUSION 168

ORDER FORM 169

INDEX 170

 

Introduction

Over the years at craft fairs and art shows, many people have approached me with questions about how to get started selling their own craft creations. Frequently asked questions include: How do you find out about where and when the shows are? How do you get into the shows? Why are some people admitted and others not? Where did you get your canopy and tables? Can I make a good living doing this? How do I get stores to sell my work? Can I use the internet to make money?

 

With this book you have all the information you need about how and where to sell what you make at art shows and craft fairs, to stores and galleries, and on the internet. Everything you need to successfully sell your crafts is here, except for the irrestable handmade products and tons of self-discipline, which you provide.

 

This book consists of the best of  my previous books 500 Tips for Marketing Your Crafts, How and Where to Sell Your Craft Creations, and Microsoft Office for Artists and Craftspeople. I have included the entire list of the best 900 shows in the country.  In addition, for the first time, I have included a CD-Rom with the mailing list of the best 1,000 craft galleries, an 8-page web site ready for your text and photos, hundreds of fonts and thousands of clip art, as well as all of the forms and templates in the book. This information contained here has helped me to sell over 2 million dollars worth of craft products over the last 30 years. My intention is that you to have even more success than I have, by  having much more information than I started with, in one complete resource.

 

 

 

 

Three Rivers Arts Festival, Pittsburgh, PA

Craft Fairs and Art Shows

 

What is a craft fair?

Craft fair:  An event that takes place usually during a weekend, and where a group of people sell what they make; jewelry, woodwork, pottery, paintings, photographs, metalwork, etc.  In addition to crafts, it may have music, or food and wine as an attraction. Every fair has a promoter who finds a location for the fair, secures permits, hires security, and determines which artists and craftspeople will sell at his or her show.

Types of fairs

Basically there are three types of shows:

þ The family show
þ The craft fair
þ The art show

 

The family show may have carnival-type entertainment, chamber of commerce booths, a craft area, and music. At the craft fair there may be some music, but the emphasis is on art and crafts. The art show usually has only fine art and some fine crafts, with no other attractions for the customer. Many events overlap in other areas, for example an art show may have a music group as a lure, or a family show may have crafts only as an afterthought.  Shows may also specialize in either traditional crafts, dried flowers and tole painting for example, or contemporary crafts, including fine handmade jewelry, pottery, fiber, and wood turning.

 

For your first show, you should pick a small local show. You probably won’t make much money but you have to start somewhere, to learn what you need in the way of display equipment, comfort, product, etc. This is called “paying your dues.”  You can even start with a flea market. There are always a few people shopping at a flea market that will recognize quality when they see it, and will give you some valuable feedback about your product, price, and display. Plus you can get rid of a few things cluttering up your garage. Flea marketing of your craft is usually only good for one or two trials, though. For one thing, the people who come each weekend to a flea market tend to be the same people over and over, and after two weeks your sales will drop dramatically.

 

 

First, you need a product

You have a product if:

1.       It is something you like to make.

2.       It is both useful and artistic.

3.       It sells for at least five times more than the cost of the materials in it.

4.       You can make a lot of them at a time.

(If you want to spend six months making a chair, fine, you might have a work of art, but you don’t have a product.) You need a product that people want. If it has a function they will want it even more.

Craft show myths

If you are thinking along any of the following lines as you contemplate a successful craft fair business, forget it. You may be able to pull it off, but you will not be a success.

1. I will buy some imports and sell them as my own.

2. I will just show up at a fair without first applying, and they will let me in.

3. I will find a successful craftsperson and copy them.

4. I will make something that the stores have and sell it cheaper.

5. I will put my crafts on the Internet and won’t have to do shows at all.

6. Being a successful craftsperson is easier that working at a job.

7. I will make only what I like. If the public likes it fine, if not, fine.

8. I can read and relax at a craft show, because I work all week.

9. I don’t need to take Visa or MC, just cash.

10. I can sell crafts and avoid taxes.

All of the above are wrong!

How to find out where the fairs are

Visit a craft fair advertised in your area and ask the artists who the promoter is.  Also ask which shows they recommend, and which ones to avoid. Find out if the show is good for high-end crafts, or lower prices, and how long the show has been going on.

 

You can also search Google on the internet with some general keywords like “craft fairs (your state).”  You will be surprised how many listings pop up.

Tips for finding a show

þ

 

Use www.festivalnet.com.

The membership fee is about $50 a year.  Search the site by state and month, and you will see all the shows in that state for that month.  One way to tell if a show has potential is by the booth fee.  If it is under $100, it is probably too small of a show to make much money. One rule of thumb is that you should make 10x the show fee for it to be a good show.

 

 

þ Use Art Fair SourceBook

After you have been doing shows for a while, and you want to travel to bigger shows in other states, this book is very helpful in telling you what to expect at a show.  It gives you tons of information about each of the top 300 shows in the country.  A subscription for one year is around $200.00. www.artfairsourcebook.com 800-358-2045

 

Localized craft fair guides

Every area in the United States has one or more craft fair guides, magazines that report on fairs for several states in that region. A few guides specialize in fairs only in a single state, and some others try to cover all of the best fairs in the entire country. (See next page.)  

 

 

 

 

Art and Wine Festival, Millbrae, California

 

 

 

 

 

List of Craft Fair Guides

 

NAME OF DIRECTORY ADDRESS CITY ST ZIP CONTACT PHONE AREA COVERED

Marketing Directory for Arkansas Craft Producers P. O. Box 500 Dierks AR 71833 Bob/Beverly Liveoak 870-286-2549 Arkansas

Festival Network Online P. O. Box 18839 Asheville NC 28814 Kirt Irmiter 800-200-3737 United States and Canada

The Crafts Fair Guide P. O. Box 688 Corte Madera CA 94976 Lee Spiegel 800-871-2341 California, Arizona, Nevada, and Oregon

The Crafts Report 300 Water Street Wilmington DE 19801 Bernadette Finnerty 302-656-2209 United States

Art Fair Source Book 2003 N. E. 11th Ave. Portland OR 97212 Greg Lawler 800-358-2045 United States

Your Show Guide P. O. Box 11795 Casa Grande AZ 85230 Mary Davidson 520-836-8427 Arizona, Colorado, and Nevada

Festivals Directory P. O.B 7515 Bonney Lk. WA 98391 Carol Farer 253-863-6617 WA, OR, ID, MT

Sunshine Artist Magazine 3210 Dade Ave. Orlando FL 32804  407-228-9862 United States

The Grapevine 240 W. Harrison Rd. Lombard IL 60148 Lynn Zumstein 630-932-8527 IA, IN, IO, IL, MI, MN, OH, WI, FL

Arts and Crafts Show Business P. O. Box 26624 Jacksonville FL 32218 LaVerne Herren 904-757-3913 FL, GA, NC, Sc, Alabama, MS, TN

        

        

The Network Marketing Guide P. O. Box 1248 Palatine IL 60078 Teresa or Nancy 847-604-3965 IL, MI, rest of the nation.

Country Craft Times 97 Baker Road Cascade MT 59421 Vickey Krautner 406-468-2348 Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, North and South Dakota

Art and Craft Show Yellow Pages P. O. Box B Red Hook NY 12571 Betty Chypre 888-424-1326 Ct, MA, NJ, NY, PA, VT.

Wisconsin Art and Craft Fairs Directory 101 E. Wilson Street Madison WI 53702  608-266-0190 Wisconsin

Craftmaster News P. O. Box 39429 Downey CA 90239  562-869-5882 CA and other western states.

How to choose a good fair

With so many fairs to choose from, it is a challenge to pick a good fair. My philosophy is to try almost any fair (if I have some indication that it might be good), and see what happens. If it is not good, I don’t have to ever do it again. Sometimes a little-known fair will surprise you with a lot of sales. To try and minimize the bad fairs, I have a few basic criteria. Number one, I like to know a lot of people will be there. 10,000, 50,000, 120,000, 600,000 people. With enough shoppers I can usually make money at any show. Show me the people!  If you have a more expensive product, then you might focus more on areas where the customers have more disposable income. This could be a smaller indoor art show that is sponsored by an art guild and has an excellent reputation, or a show in a very wealthy area. Again, experience counts. You have to be willing to try any well-reputed show at least once. That is the only way to know if your product and price is a match for that customer base.

þ

 

Calculate the potential of the show.

Multiply the attendance number by $10 (half of the people will spend $20 and half will spend nothing) and  divide it by the number of artists.  50,000 people times $10 equals $500,000 divided by 250 artists equals an average of $2,000 per artist.

 

The application process

The first step is to get the fair’s application. This doesn’t cost you anything. Write to every fair that you might want to do, and ask for an application. I recommend sending a simple typed letter with your name and contact information. This enables the show producer to get your address right.  The letter need only say "Please send me an application and any information about your upcoming shows, and put me on your mailing list. Thank you."  Print fifty copies of the same generic letter, sign them, and mail them to the shows that you might be interested in. You don’t have to impress the promoter in this letter. They will gladly send an application to anyone. Sometimes, if you have waited until the last minute, the fair can fax you an application or you can get it online. Call for an application only if you have to, not as a habit.

 

When you receive the application, the next step is to make a deadline list with the name of the fair, deadline date, and fair date on a sheet of paper, posted in a place where you will see it. There is a form for this in the spreadsheet section of this book, on page 79. You then file the fair application in a folder with the name of the month on the folder that the fair is going to happen. When your deadline list shows that the fair application deadline is coming up, you go to the fair’s month folder, take out the application, fill it out, and mail it in.

Read and complete the application

Read the entire application when you get it. If you don’t, you will often miss little details, such as “send in a resume,” or “don’t send anything in but the application,” or even “include a slide of your workshop.” It might be hard to get a good slide of your workshop at the last minute. Then fill out the application completely and neatly. Many promoters have told me that they get a lot of incomplete and/or unreadable applications.    

What is the jury looking for?

The jury is looking for good slides, first and foremost. See below. This is the big hurdle. And of course, the jurors are looking for creativity and originality. I can't help you with that.

If a juror is in doubt about a particular applicant, the quality of the slides becomes the determining factor. If the slides are poor, the applicant is out. If they are professional, the applicant is still in the running. Good slides won’t necessarily get you into good shows, but bad slides are likely to keep you out.

Slides

How important are slides? Very important. Extremely important! Simply put, the better the show, the better your slides must be to get in. Although there are still a few good shows that are filled simply by the promoter looking at photos on her kitchen table, all of the best shows are juried.

A jury consists of 2 to 12 artists, promoters, art teachers, and local experts who sit in a darkened room while all of the slides are projected simultaneously on a wall or screen. As the three-to-six slides are shown, each judge gives points for design, creativity, craftsmanship, etc. The process often takes less than a minute for each artist, with the promoter reading the descriptions of each slide supplied by the artist if necessary. Often the acceptance of the artist is based solely on these points.

 

The first thing the jury notices is the quality of the slide. A poorly lit or badly composed slide might not look so bad under home viewing conditions, but at a jurying the slide is instantly compared with the expertly photographed slides already shown that day. So the first impression is important. A juror will be less impressed with unprofessional slides, and they will give fewer points. No matter how nice the craftwork is, you are wasting your time and money with poor quality slides.

 

All slides should be consistent. Each slide should show only one craft item, shown close-up, filling the screen, and well exposed. There is a strong desire in beginning craftspeople to show many items, five or six in each slide. They want to show the jury the range and variety of their design. But the juror will see only clutter. You have to pick your best pieces.

 

The same is true for the background. All of your slides should have the same background. Beginners love to put rocks, flowers, bricks, and other stuff in the picture. They also like to photograph on a fancy cloth or carpet background. They hope the attractiveness of the background will make their craft look more attractive. The opposite will happen. The juror will be confused, not impressed.

 

If you don’t want to spend the time and money to get good photo results on your own, hire a commercial photographer that specializes in craft or small product (table-top) photography. A couple of photographers specializing in crafts are listed in the “useful addresses” section of this book on page 69. Always ask them for unmodified digital files or original film.

 

Photography tips

 

þ Make your own slides with either a 35mm camera or digital camera.

It doesn’t have to be fancy. It just needs to have manual settings so you can control your depth of field. You can use any 35mm camera, or any digital camera with 3.2 megapixels or more.

þ You can have slides made from your digital files.

You can correct your digital photos in Photoshop or Elements, and email the files to www.slides.com.  They make slides from your digital files for around $2.50 each and FedEx them back to you. You can also use your digital files for online applications and for Zapplications. The best resolution for making slides from digital is 4056 x 2730. Another company that makes slides from digital files is www.iprintfromhome.com.

þ Use a 50mm lens with a macro feature.

You can get one of these on eBay for less than $100. For close-ups, you will need macro capabilities. The macro feature will help you fill the image if you make small items such as jewelry. To see if your digital camera with a built-in lens has macro, look for the flower symbol.

þ Film users, use Fuji Provia or Velvia, ISO 100, slide film.

If you use film, Velvia will give you saturated bright colors, while Provia gives you more natural colors. You can use this film indoors if you have blue photofloods. If you don’t have blue photofloods, use a blue 80A filter on your camera lens.  For digital cameras, use the lowest ISO setting in the camera, and the highest resolution setting, for the highest quality of image.

þ Use photo flood bulbs and reflectors indoors.

Use three 500 watt bulbs for indoor shots. Position one on each side and one at the top. Never use a built-in flash.

 

 

 

þ Turn off all fluorescent lights.

If there is a fluorescent light on anywhere in the room, it will add an unwelcome green tint to your photo. If you must have fluorescent lighting, use the daylight bulbs. You should turn off as many other lights as possible, so you control the lighting with your photofloods.

þ Use f16 or f22 for depth of field.

Depth of field is the area of the image that is in focus, from front to back. If your camera has an “A” setting (aperture priority setting), set your f-stop at f22 and the camera will set the shutter speed. Everything will be in focus.  If you want to focus on one special detail of your work, or hide the background, use f4 for less depth of field.

þ Override the camera’s light meter if possible.

The built-in light meter in the camera will overexpose dark items, and underexpose light items.

þ

 

Always use a tripod.

Greater depth of field requires a slower shutter speed, and the longer shutter opening time increases the chance of camera shake. Use either a cable release or the camera timer so you won’t shake the camera and get a fuzzy picture.

þ Use a neutral background.

Don’t use plaids, weavings, etc. Uncluttered is the key. Indoors use white, gray, or black (never use red), outdoors use white roll paper or a white sheet. Use a canopy in bright sun to provide even light. It will act as a giant soft box.

þ Use a graduated background.

You can find gradient paper at Superior Specialties, 800-666-2545 www.superspec.com  I like the #9, black to white, and the #37, blue to white.

 

       

þ Be sure your lens is clean.

Use only a commercial lens cleaning cloth on your lens.  Anything else can scratch the coating on the lens.

 

þ Write down settings for every shot you take.

Save your notes for future reference. If you have kept notes if you use film, you won’t have to relearn the entire process every time you take your photos. When you get the slides back, you can match the best shots with the settings.

þ

 

Use a light box and an 8x loupe.

Look at your slides closely to see if they are sharp or not.  Slides should be clear and in sharp focus. You can get a cheap light box at a camera store for about $30. Another way to see if your slides are sharp is to project them on a screen so you can see them the same size as the jury will.

 

 

þ Use a light tent for small items.

An EZcube Light Tent and photo floods provides even lighting.  They are available on eBay for $45 to $90, depending on the size.

 

 

 

þ Make your own light cube.

You can make a light cube out of translucent panels from Home Depot.  They are in the fluorescent fixture department. They come in 2’ by 4’. You can cut them down to 2’ by 2’, and tape the edges together to make a cube with one side open. You can also make a cube out of 12 24” pieces of pvc covered with light-weight white cloth.

 

þ Put a copyright notice on your slides.

Your copyright notice should say “Artwork Ó 2007 (Your Name).” Some shows don’t allow labels because they cause jams in the projector. In that case you use a Sharpie ULTRA fine point marker. Avery #8167 labels will fit on a slide.  

 

þ Have 5 slides duplicated at a time.

When having slides copied by a lab, have at least 5 or 10 made of the same image at a time to reduce wear on the originals. Always specify 1:1 when getting slides made, so the lab will take the film out of the holder and nothing gets cropped. Store slides so they don’t rub together.

þ Look at your slides as a group.

Put them together. They should have a consistency of vision. Check out the color relationships.  Are they interesting?  Look for a theme.

þ Never use the digital zoom.

Always use the optical zoom, somewhere in the middle of the zoom range. The optics are better in the middle.  Move the camera, not the zoom.

þ Always use “Save As” when working with digital.

Change the name with each modification step, so the original won’t get lost. Save the image at the highest possible setting. Each save to JPEG reduces the quality.

Booth shots

When a show has two qualified applicants in the same media, and they can’t chose, they will go with the best looking booth.  

þ

 

Shoot your booth shot from a slight angle.

Remove all clutter. Make the your product stand out.  Compare your booth shot to your product photos.  They should be the same quality. No people should be in the booth photo.  The top of the booth should not show in the photo.  The jurors don’t care what canopy you use.

 

 

 

þ Use a wide-angle lens for booth photos.

A 28mm to 35mm lens will work best.  Stand on a stool for a better angle, if necessary.

þ Overexpose outdoor booth shots.

If you don’t, the booth will look dark because the automatic meter in the camera will under-expose for the sky. Better yet, keep the sky and canopy out of the photo altogether. A cloudy day will provide even light, which is best. Use a canopy wall on the ground in front of the booth (out of sight of the camera, of course) to reflect more light into the booth.

þ Use flash on indoor booth shots.

Try to get light into the corners of the booth. You can use your photofloods if you keep them out of the photo.

Zapplication

Many of the larger shows are using the zapplication process for online screening. Membership is free to artists. You don’t need any special software (except for photo editing), but you do need an email address and a credit card when you apply to shows. When you want to apply to a show, you simply go online, type in a brief description about your craft, select the photos you want to apply with, and pay the application fee with your credit card. Their web site, www.zapplication.org, is very helpful with detailed information. Zapplication has about 15,000 artist profiles. One nice feature is that they email you about upcoming shows.

 

Photos for Zapplication must be square, 1920 pixels on each side, and under 1.8 mb in size. You can take your own digital pictures at your highest resolution, crop them square, and resize them to 72 ppi by 1920 pixels x 1920 pixels with Elements or Photoshop, and adjust the levels to change the contrast. Any 3.2 megapixel digital camera will work, but 6 to 10 mp is better. The photos should be saved to .tiff as you work on them, and when you are finished saved for the web as baseline .jpg’s.  

 

If you use film, you can either have your slides digitized by your local lab or scan them yourself on a home scanner. Make sure they are saved as .tiff files. Since your photos have to be square for Zapplication, and 35 mm slides are rectangular, you will have to add black strips on the sides of vertical slides or the top and bottom of horizontal slides to make them square.  Basically you are making the canvas behind the slide square, and black, to provide the stripes. The zapplication.org web site explains how to do this very clearly. There are at least 15 professionals listed at the zapplication web site that will convert your slides for you for a fee.

 

Artists can apply through ZAPP™ by following these steps :

1. Prepare your artwork images formatted to the Image Preparation specifications.

2. Create a profile by entering basic contact information and creating a username and password to ZAPP™.

3. Upload up to 40 digital images of your artwork to your image portfolio.

4. Select your choice of participating shows to apply to.

5. Choose the required number of images to apply to a specific show from your image portfolio.

6. Pay the application fee online with a credit card or mail a check.

7. Submit the application online.

8. Receive e-mail notifications when your applications have been received, and jury results.

9. View your application status at any time on the "My ZAPPlications" page and choose to accept or decline show invitations on the site.

 

Get the application in on time

Another detail often overlooked when reading the application is the “must be received by’ or “must be postmarked by” date.  Don’t wait till the deadline date to discover that the show wants the application in their office by that date, instead of merely postmarked with that date. Some shows (not many, fortunately) give preference to early postmarks. If you have any indication that they do, either by word of mouth or specifically stated on the application, get the application in as soon as you get it. At any rate, plan to get the application in the post office at least a week early if you can. That way you will have enough time (if you didn’t read the application when it arrived) to get the required workshop slide, or price list, or photocopy of ID, etc

 

Tips for getting into the show

þ Apply to the show early.

Some shows jury slides in the order they arrived at the office. Jurors might look at over 5,000 slides in a few days and they become bleary eyed after a while. You want them to be impressed with your slides while they are still alert.

 

 

 

þ Make your descriptions precise.

If the show asks for a 25-word description for each image, don’t write more or less. Your description will probably be read to the jury.  If it is too long, it won’t be read in full, and if it is short, you are missing an opportunity to tell the jurors what they can’t see in your slides, such as process, texture, materials, use, etc.  Zapplication allows only 100 characters, and the one description is for all the images.

þ Grab the jurors attention with your slides.

Use slides of your most colorful and interesting work, to get them noticed. Jurors are looking for attention to detail, artistic mastery of materials, structure, and concept. They like to see whimsy, originality, and how everything works together. They are also comparing your work to all the other work submitted. Jurors usually have only 5 to 15 seconds to look at your slides. Sometimes there are several rounds of judging.

Planning your booth

One way to get up to speed about what kind of booth to use is to visit a craft show. Look around at the types of booths and the booth designs. What display looks simple, with the craft dominating, and what looks crowded. Which booths are attractive? Which artists seem busiest? The customer, when faced with a hundred booths and not enough time to examine all of them, will go to the most attractive and interesting looking booth.

 

Don’t be afraid to ask other artists where they got certain items or how they use them. Also ask them how they hold down their canopies, where they got their display showcase, etc. Don’t bother them when they are busy, and limit your questions to only a couple at each booth. Most artists and craftspeople love to share information about their booths (when they have time, of course).

Indoor booths

If you are doing indoor shows only, then a booth frame with drapes or other wall covering is required. You can rent pipe and drape at most good indoor shows for about $140.

 

A workable combination indoor/outdoor booth is a white E-Z UP with the top off indoors (and the center top pole removed). This should have a Velcro-attaching top, as the bolt-on top is a real pain to remove, and you do not want a top in indoor shows. A lot of people will have much more elaborate displays, and scoff at this suggestion. However, I think the E-Z UP is good because:

1. It is very sturdy. It won’t fall into your neighbor’s ceramic or glass booth. (Note that I are talking indoors here.)

2. It has a lot of places from which to hang lights and drapes.

3. You can hang banners across the front to cover the lights and the frame. You can also make cloth socks to cover the legs.

4. It goes up in a flash, leaving you more time to work on the other parts of your display.

5. You don’t have to keep track of a lot of corner pieces and rolling poles.

6. You don’t have to rent pipe and drape, which adds $70 to $140 to your show fees.

7. You can use it for your outdoor shows as well.

 

Lighting

Indoor shows provide electricity. At some shows you have to pay extra, at others you don’t. Some shows require a union electrician and $65.00 just to plug in and turn on your lights!  

 

 

 

Halogen lamps cost about $8 each. They give more light and show colors accurately. They also use less electricity then regular light bulbs. Halogen lamps are available in spot or flood configurations.  Most booths have a 500-watt maximum. Ten 50-watt halogens will light a booth much better than six 75-watt incandescent bulbs. Office Depot has 24” light bars that have three bulb holders. Or you can get track in 4-foot lengths and light units for about $16 each. Attach the track with string ties to your booth poles. Make sure your booth lights don’t shine in the customer’s eyes. Don’t use gooseneck lamps.

 

Use a three-prong extension cord, and grounded 5-plug power strips. Everything should be grounded. You should never use two-prong extension cords. If the electrician requires a grounded (three-prong) wire on your lights, and you have only a two-prong plug, you will have to add a ground wire. Run a wire from the metal part of your light along the original wire and attach all three wires to a three prong plug. Have someone who is knowledgeable about electricity to help you with this.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outdoor booths

 

 

 

Economy--The best display for the least buck is again the E-Z UP canopy. It sets up in a hurry. You can  usually find a quality canopy with durable walls and a carrying bag for under $600. If you do 25 shows a year for four years, your cost is $6 per show.  If you get one with white-coated metal and a Velcro attached top, you can also use it indoors.

 

As for the top, make sure it is not a color canopy. A purple canopy will make all of your products look purple, a blue one will give them a blue tinge, etc. Don’t use a canopy that does not have the legs straight up and down. The canopies with legs that point out look really out of place in a professional craft show.

 

If they are in season at Costco or Sam’s Club, the Caravan (or EZ-Up Lite) is cheaper, around $200, and works for all but the windiest shows. They are lightweight and waterproof. They come with four sides, an awning, a bag with wheels, removable top, and a white coating on the metal parts.

 

 

 

 

           

 

E-Z UP frame used outdoors, and at indoor show for sturdy hanging of heavy items

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Professional--The Light Dome, from Creative Energies, 800-351-8889, is very heavy duty. The cost is around $800.00 with 4 walls and carrying cases. The frame weighs about 35 lbs, and the walls about 8 lbs each.  The top is 14 lbs, so the whole canopy weighs just over 75 lbs. You can use it anywhere, indoors or out, it goes up relatively fast, it is lightweight, and it looks good. It is also the most sturdy. I have been in shows with hurricane-force winds that had every tent flapping in every direction with the exception of one well-anchored light dome, which didn’t even move.

 

 

 

Light Dome

 

 

 

 

You can also use a Light Dome indoors. The large round cross-poles hold drapes and lights easily.

 

 

Other Canopies –Some artists get a Trimline Canopy for really bad weather. This is a different look than the E-Z UP, and takes about 20 minutes longer to set up.  Available from the Flourish Company at 800-296-0049.  Flourish also sells mesh panels for hanging art.

 

 

 

Craft Huts are used by artists who sell in hurricane areas. They have steel legs and will not leak.  Always use the top cross brace on a Craft Hut.  If you don’t, the arches can blow in toward the middle, and the top will fill with water during rainstorms and collapse the entire tent.  They are also available from Flourish.

 

City streets

 

 

 

 

The best anchor for city streets is weights. Thirty five to fifty pounds per corner will usually be enough. Some craftspeople nail the legs of the canopy with concrete nails, or use screws with washers and electric screwdriver, directly into the asphalt.  Many shows expressly prohibit this (today’s nail hole is tomorrow’s pothole). The promoters may not mention it to you, but you might not get back into the show. I recommend weighting two or more corners with 70 pounds each, then have an extra 70 lb. weight in the middle of the booth, with a rope tied to the top (for E-Z UPs). Concrete blocks weigh 34 lbs. Any wind that can move this much weight can move almost any amount of weight, so if a storm is expected, and you don’t have tall panels, lower the canopy to half-height overnight (another handy feature of the E-Z UPs and Light Domes).

Grassy parks

 

 

Tents in a grassy park are the easiest to tie down. Use dog stakes. A dog stake is a corkscrew-like device available at pet supply stores that is screwed into the ground. Put two stakes on the two corners that face the wind, and another in the middle of the tent. The middle one is screwed in before the show, but it is only used when the wind comes up. A rope is quickly tied to it and looped over the top of the canopy frame. This sure beats standing there holding your canopy as the wind blows it around.   You can and should still use weights, if you have them.

 

  

In a large tent

Some outdoor shows have huge big-top tents that everyone sets up their booths under. The Asparagus Festival in Stockton, California, the Columbus Arts Festival in Ohio, and the Jazz Festival in New Orleans have big tents. A tent show usually consists of a Circus Tent about 30’ by 80’ or larger. Some tents have room for your E-Z UP inside of the tent. Be sure to remove your top for more light, and remove your peak pole so you don’t put a dent in their tent. Occasionally a tent show will not allow E-Z UPs or a full size 10 x 10 booth. You will still need something to hold your walls up and to keep them from flapping into your neighbor’s booth. You might have to make or buy a conduit frame to make a booth nine and one-half feet on each side by seven feet high. Flourish also sells these. You might need a wall for the front at night, unless they drop the tent walls. There is no need to spend much on this setup, as you will only use it in tent shows.    

 

 

Weather

 

Rain:  The best protection from rain is a canopy with walls. Everything should be stored in Rubbermaid’s. If the corners of the top of your E-Z UP start to collect water, a large clamp on the top of the inside frame will usually prevent puddling.

Wind: Wind will either blow your canopy away or blow things out from under it. The best tie-down is to something already there, a rail, a tree, park bench. If you are next to a really heavy booth, ask them if you can tie your canopy legs to theirs.

Wind AND rain: This is the worst scenario. This is one reason why a lot of craftspeople only do indoor shows. But they are missing a lot of opportunities to make money. All a windy and rainy show means is that you need even more weather protection.  The sun will eventually come out and you will make lots of money.

Heat:  Bring an ice chest, ice, and lots of water. You need a canopy for shade. You can add an awning on the side that gets the most direct sun, to shade your products. portable AC or DC fans (from truck stop stores) will help keep you and your customers cool.    

 

 

 

More tips for outdoor shows, weights and weather

þ

 

Always have a weight handy when you set up.

You should tie your booth to a weight or immoveable object while you are setting up, in case of a sudden gust of wind.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

þ Use 8-gallon plastic water cans for weights.

8 gallons of water weighs about 65 lbs. Get the water cans with handles (sporting goods, camping stores, or RV stores). Fill them at a gas station or food booth when you get to the show and dump them at the end of the show. Carrying empty cans will save you gas, since less weight in your vehicle increases your gas mileage.

 

 

 

 

þ  Use barbell weights for booth weights.

Use rope through the hole in them for hanging from your top frame

 

 

 

þ

 

Make your own weights with PVC tube.

Fill a 6” diameter PVC pipe, 36” long, with concrete, using an end cap and a 12” eyebolt with a washer on the other end. It can be tied to the legs of the canopy (remember, no tape on canopy legs) or fastened to the upper frame with a rope. Florida artists use as much as 100 lbs. on each corner of their display. (It can be very windy in Florida!) Don’t use 3” or 4” tube—you’ll be wasting your time with light weights. You can also fill a 5-gallon bucket with concrete and use an eyebolt in the same way.

þ Attach weights to top of tent as well as legs.

Attach the rope to the cross bar on E-Z UPs.  When weights are used only on the legs, the tent can still twist in the wind.

þ Use metal stakes in hard ground.

E-Z UP canopies come with 12” nail-like stakes. They are designed to be hammered into dirt, through the hole in each leg plate. Have a claw hammer handy to get them out.

þ Use your spare tire for an emergency weight.

If you forgot your weights, use your spare tire. It won’t help much but might keep your canopy from flying until you get some real weight. Use a rope to attach it to the center or top corner of your booth.

þ

 

Use ropes to keep canopy straight.

Screw a stake in the ground at the middle of each side and at the back, then tie ropes to each corner. This keeps the tent from leaning in the wind.

 

 

þ

 

Keep your electrical outlet dry.

If you have an outdoor booth with electricity, make sure  your outlet is in your booth at night. Raise it up off the ground. Don’t wrap a plastic bag around the outlet; it might fill up with water. When unplugging lights, stand on something dry, like cardboard or a ladder.  

 

þ Keep an ear on the weather.

A weather radio can be purchased at Radio Shack for less than $50. You should ask a local at the show which county the show is in, as weather reports are given by county.

þ

 

Make an awning for your booth with conduit.

Use three eight or ten-foot pieces of 1” conduit.  Clamp two on each side of your E-Z UP, poking out the front about 3 feet.  Clamp one piece in the middle.  You can fold up a wall, or use a banner, and hang it across the pipes. Put clamps on the ends. Use it in rainy weather or when you are facing the sun.  Some of the new Caravan canopies come with an awning. Make sure it is 6’ 6” tall or more, so no one bumps their head on it.

þ If it is really windy take your canopy down.

This is what might happen if you don’t.

 

 

 

Fountain Hills, Arizona

þ Get 12-volt accessories at truck stops.  

Truck drivers run everything on 12 volts. You can get 12-volt fans to keep your booth cool.  They also have 12-volt coffee makers, coolers, TV’s, vibrating seat back pads, hot plates, etc.

 

Banners, booth signs, and photos

 

Banner: A banner is a great help to people trying to find your booth who had promised to return (those customers are called Be-Backs.)  It also helps them decide whether to come over to the booth in the first place, when there are so many booths to choose from. The banner should say something about the contents of the booth, not simply the name of the artist. Unless the artist is relatively famous, the banner should say “Handmade Wood Bowls” or “Wood Bowls by Dana Andrews,” not just “Dana Andrews.”

 

 

 

You might need two banners. One cloth, about one foot high by five feet long that hangs across the top of your canopy on a rope. It helps people find you if they came to the show looking for you.  You can take it down at night, when you don’t want anyone to know what is in your booth. The other 2 1/2 feet high and 9 feet long, and vinyl. Usually made by a commercial sign company and has your product and signature on it. It is used only for big outdoor fairs when a potential customer may be 50 feet or more away from the front of the booth. Get banners from Kinkos, with grommets on the corners. Attach to 10’ conduit poles with bungies, and attach poles to canopy legs with clamps.

 

Statement of Purpose (Artists Statement): This is an 8” by 10” sheet of paper in a clear acrylic stand on your table or hanging in your booth on the wall. It might have a photo of you working in your shop and your name and address at the top. The rest of the page should tell the customer a little about you, how your craft is made, what materials you use, and something about your motivation and purpose. Thanks to the NAIA, many fairs are requiring it in your booth. Some customers love to read it completely while waiting. Others might even want a copy, if you feel like handing them out. Send a copy of this statement with your show applications, unless the show specifically states that you should only send slides and nothing else. Some shows are requiring an artist’s statement with the application.  

 

Booth sign inside: Every booth should have a sign about 12” by 24” with the name of the artist and where the artist is from, hanging in the back of the booth. Some shows provide them, but I like to bring my own in case they don’t. A sign that indicates the town and state you are from is a good conversation starter. Having your name in large print is helpful to the customer when writing a check.  

Photo of your workshop: Always have a photo of your shop somewhere in the booth. It can be little or big. When asked, “Do you make these yourself?” point to the photo and say, “Yes. Here is a picture of my shop and the tools I use.”  This is also a great conversation starter. People are very curious as to how you make your product.  

 

 

 

Photos of your creations:  Many artists with small products have large photos of their products hanging up in their booth. These are helpful for people who can’t get quite close enough to see because of the crowd. You can get a slide or print blown up to a 20” x 24” poster at Kinko’s for under $40. Kodak, through photo stores, offers 20” x 30” posters from your slides for $22.95.

 

More display ideas

þ

 

Use drop down bamboo rollups for walls.

8-foot rollups attached to your EZ-up frame with shower curtain hooks will make your booth seem cozier. They allow air circulation on a hot day, while providing some privacy from the booth next to you. You never know who your neighbor is going to be. The only drawback is that 8 feet is too long for most cars without a luggage rack.  2 four-foot rollups can be used instead.

 

 

 

þ Have your product photos laminated on both sides.

If your hanging photos are laminated on both sides, they will hang easier in your booth and won’t be damaged by water. For indoor shows, mount them on foam core from an art supply store. Use grommets and strong thin wire to hang up your photos to keep them from ripping or falling down.

þ Use dark curtains indoors.

The background should not be noticeable. If not black, burgundy and neutral colors are best.

þ Use white walls outdoors.

White will reflect light into your booth and brighten up your crafts in the shade of your canopy.

þ Hang a curtain over a back corner of your booth.

Use the space for a changing room or storage.

þ Fireproof your tablecloths.

Fire retardant paints and sprays are available from Flamort. They will provide a certificate for the fire marshal.  www.flamort.com  (510) 357-9494

 

 

þ Use a portfolio or scrapbook.

 

 

Take prints of your past creations and put them in a scrapbook along with pictures of your studio. Customers can browse this while waiting.

þ Display items at various heights.

This increases the visual appeal of your booth. Small items in your booth should be closer to eye level. Makes your crafts easy to reach. Pedestals are available from Armstrong Products in Oklahoma-800-278-4279  www.armstrongproducts.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

þ Make your table taller.

Use PVC tubing to make leg extensions, so your customers don’t have to bend over to see your products. The closer to customer eye level the better.

 

þ Have signs in your booth that communicate.

Artist’s statement, credit card acceptance, discount policy, name of business, etc., all signs that talk to your customers for you. They also give customers something to read while you are talking to other customers.

þ Uncluttered look:

After you set up, step back and see if your booth looks cluttered. If so, simplify it. Hide boxes and carts. Some promoters require this, and it benefits you as well.        

þ

 

Use a tall chair.

You shouldn’t have to get up to get out of your chair to make a sale. Every time you get up from a low chair you put stress on your back. You should be able to just slide forward off of it. The seat should be at least 30” high, so you are eye-level with the customer. I like Gold Medal canvas director chairs and the aluminum chair that www.dickblick.com sells.

 

Packaging

Gift Boxes:  If your product is useful as a gift, and a gift box is available, you should display a few boxes and offer them to every customer, especially around Christmas, Father’s Day, Mother’s Day, etc. If the customer is looking for a gift and sees the product already in a nice gift box, you have just provided a solution. Or the gift box may stimulate the customer to think of your product as a gift and then think about who to give it to.

Bags: Every product should be put in an attractive bag. The customer appreciates it. You should have two sizes of bags, a small one that holds one or two products, and a big one that holds more. Offer to hold the customer’s purchase while they check out the rest of the show.

Hang tags: Every product should be packaged with a tag that has information about how the product was made, what it is made of, how to care for it, who made it, and how to get in touch with them. This tag should also fit neatly in the gift box.    

 

Taking VISA and MasterCard

You should try to get set up to take charge cards as soon as possible. At some shows your income will be 80 or 90 percent from VISA or MasterCard sales. There are two ways to take cards:

1. Run the card through a portable imprinter at the show, and then call in the sales when you get home.

2. Run the card through a portable wireless terminal at the show, which clears the card through a cellular connection.

 

You will need a business account with a bank, and permission from them to take cards in your business. The bank is going to give you the money from the cards before it is actually collected by them, so you must have good credit. If your bank won’t let you take credit cards, there are several choices:  

 

 

1.  Get another bank. If you have $2,000 cash to open a business account with, make it clear to the new bank that your opening the account is contingent on your being able to process credit cards. They will take you seriously if they want your business. You tell them that you will be taking the cards at trade shows or at shows in your home. They will probably visit your home to see if you really have a business. They may also want to see a business license.

2.  Go directly to a credit card company. Novus Services, a company associated with Discover Card, will set you up directly with them, and they send the money from the card charges directly to your bank. Their phone number is 1-800-347-2000. They will let you take MasterCard and VISA in addition to Discover. They give you a portable imprinter and sell you a Trans 330 terminal for about $300. You imprint a charge slip from the card at the show in the imprinter and give the customer a copy. Later at your motel or home, you key in the numbers from the card on the Trans 330, which is hooked up to a phone, and they give you an authorization number clearing the card. They charge you about 2.4 % of the sale amount. They are anxious to get more business, and more likely to sign you up than a bank. American Express is a separate company, and their charges must be processed separately. They too are actively looking for new businesses.  They have a separate imprinter for their shorter charge slips.    

 

A cell-phone setup has the added benefit of having a phone for calling. The drawback to the cell-phone setup is that there may be roaming charges in addition to the monthly charge for the cell phone, plus charges for the terminal. There are some areas where a cell phone doesn’t work. The whole process of clearing the card by phone usually takes about thirty seconds or more.

 

 

 

 

Portable credit card terminals

 

 

You can use a portable wireless modem terminal at shows. One company with a terminal I recommend is Trade Show Merchants Network. Their number is 888-626-2772. The machine they first sold is called a Lipman 2090. There are newer models available, such as the 8000. They are completely portable, and uses either rechargeable batteries or can be hooked up to AC POwer. The 2090 can be connected to a phone line in your office, or connected by wireless when you are at a show. The 8000 has no phone line connectons, but greater reception. The customer’s charge card is processed immediately by sliding the card through the terminal, and a receipt is handed to them to sign. A copy of the receipt is printed for the customer. The terminal clears the card in about seven seconds. At the end of the day, the credit card company, processes the batch of charges and deposits the money from VISA and MasterCard into your bank account. At the end of the month you receive a statement from the company detailing your sales by card type. Most companies charge a capture fee for American Express and Discover cards for clearing their cards. American Express sends the money from these cards to your bank directly. It may take a few days longer to appear in your account. You have to set up the accounts with American Express and Discover separately, and then the terminal will take all of the cards.  

The cost of the latest Lipman 8000 wireless terminal is around $700. Credit card processing fees are cheaper (1.8%) when cards are run through a terminal and cleared immediately, than when run through an imprinter and called in by phone (2.8%). The reduction in fees and reduction in losses from bad cards will pay for the terminal in a year or two. The time you save by not calling in the cards after the show, and the peace of mind from having the card cleared at the show, make the cost of the terminal worthwhile.

(http://www.infomerchant.net/creditcardprocessing/pos_terminals/lipman/nurit-3010.html)

 

 

 

Tips for taking credit cards

þ Put up “Credit Cards Accepted” signs.

Some people are looking for this notice. They might have run out of cash at another booth, or simply didn’t bring any.  By the way, never charge extra for charge card usage. It is illegal to charge a customer extra for using a credit card.  However it is not illegal to give a discount for cash.

þ Keep all credit card sales receipts.

Put them in a separate envelope, with the name of the show written on it. If the charge is disputed, the signed original will be easier to locate.

 

 

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Check the customer’s credit card for their signature.

If it isn’t signed, have them sign it before you take it.  If you are suspicious, ask to see their driver’s license, and compare the signatures.  Some customers prefer not to sign their credit cards.  You can’t force them to do so, but remind them that a thief could sign their name for them, and then the “false signatures” would match.

þ Bring a manual credit card machine and charge slips.

If your electric credit card machine fails, runs out of paper, etc, you will still be able to take credit cards. If you use a manual credit card machine, try to get a phone number and address. It is illegal to require a credit card user’s phone number, but you can ask them to put it in your address book for your mailing list. Then you will be able to call them if the slip is unreadable or lost (or if they left something in your booth). If you run out of charge slips when on the road, go to a local bank for more charge slips.

þ Always check the charge slip for clarity.

Check to see if the number and expiration date is clear. Some cards have worn numbers, or the numbers have been tampered with (flattened). Sometimes the machine might not imprint the whole number (which you must notice when you fill out the slip). When you get home to call the charges in, if you don’t have the whole number, you won’t get paid.

 

þ Carry a portable battery pack.

 

 

A Vector Jump Starter (from automotive supply) and a Radio shack 12 volt DC to 110 AC converter, will come in really handy if your credit card terminal battery goes dead. The EverStart shown here is from Target and works just as well with the AC converter.

 

 

Sales techniques

People buy for personal benefit. Theirs. Not to do you a favor. Not because you are good looking or well dressed. They benefit from your product, or they pass it by. They might visualize how comfortable it will feel in their hands the next day when they pick it up. Or they will visualize being perceived as individualistic because they have or give a one-of-a-kind object, or as an art lover who has actually met the artist who made the item, or as a meticulous person who buys well-crafted items. This is where the large photo of your item being used is helpful; it shows the customer how he will benefit. It is simply a matter of the price of the item matching the benefits of the item to the customer.

 

 

 

Reading. No, you shouldn’t read a book in your booth. It is too absorbing. A magazine might be okay, as the articles are shorter and don’t require as much attention. A magazine about your craft, Metalsmith or Fine Woodworking for example, is beneficial to both you and the customer. You learn some new techniques while waiting for a sale, and when you set the magazine down where the customer can browse it while waiting, he might starting   thinking about fine woodworking or that you are an expert in metalwork. If a magazine is prominently placed in your display, the customer might even infer that you are featured in the magazine. No harm there. Someday you will be. If you already are featured in a magazine, by all means, display it.

 

Sales pressure. Some customers might walk into a booth where the artist is preoccupied, but be reluctant to walk into a booth where the artist is staring at them and eager to jump up and start trying to sell them something. Always say a couple of words to the customer, such as “Feel free to look closely,” or “Try using it.” After you get the product in their hands, give them time to examine the work, give them the details they ask for, and maybe a suggestion that the item would make a good gift, and that you have gift boxes. Then leave them alone again. People really appreciate feeling un-pressured in a shopping environment. Just imagine how you want to be treated when you shop. You want to be helped when you need it, but you don’t want a salesperson hovering around you all the time. Do the same for your customers.

 

How badly you need to make the sale is irrelevant. Whenever a customer asks how the show has been for you, tell them you are doing well, even if it is the worst show you have ever done. Even the worst shows have some benefits, such as learning frugality or humility, so you won’t necessarily be lying. Never complain to the customers. There is nothing they can do about it.

 

Suggest the lower priced item. When a customer asks you which one you recommend, never recommend the higher priced item. They will always be suspicious and you will be scrambling to explain why it is better. Recommend a mid-range item, and they will immediately trust you. Of course, all of your products are of excellent quality and priced at exactly the right price.

 

Give them a reason to buy today. Offer them a small discount (under 5%) if they buy now. Say, “It is always good to have some gifts around in case you need them for an unexpected occasion.” In order to encourage an immediate sale, don’t give out business cards (except for the “care and contact information” card you give the customer after the sale).

 

Assume everyone has a credit card. That means they have the money to buy your item, unless all of their cards are maxed out. Be sure they can see your VISA card signs, or machine, and that you tell them you take charge cards.    

 

Selling tips

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Listen to your customers.

They notice if you are not listening.  If you are already dealing with a customer, and a second customer interrupts, ask the first customer if you can talk to the second one. Deal with the question politely, and then get back with your first customer.

þ Educate your customer.

Art sales involve 50% education and 50% sales technique.  Most people at your booth have no idea how you do what you do. Tell them why your work is worth the price and how hard it was to make. Be prepared to talk your head off. Don’t let a few know-it-alls discourage you.

þ Mention environmental aspects of your craft.

If you have an environmental angle to your product, describe it. Conservation of resources is very important to some people. Tell them how you use materials economically.

 

 

 

þ Tell people a story about your product.

They want to know what inspired you to make it and how hard it is to make. Have photos of your shop to show them. Tell them about your lifestyle.

þ Maintain eye contact.

If you are looking all around the show, they will too.

 

 

 

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Never judge a customer by their appearance.

Every artist has a story about the customer who looked like a hobo, but bought a very expensive item.

þ Remind people if it is the last day of the show.

There are customers at every show who think the show goes on forever.

þ Use key words to make sales.

Some comfortable key words are “warm, soft, clean, powerful, bigger, better, and yes.”  Yes is the best. Yes, I have a gift box. Yes, I take charge cards. Yes, I have a trash bag. Yes, yes, yes.

þ Offer a hesitant customer a guarantee.

Offer a full refund, replacement, or repair if customer is dissatisfied.

þ If people ask for your card, get their address or email.

Hand them a guest book to write their email in.  You can contact them with a postcard or catalog later. Do this whether you have a business card or not.  

 

 

On the road

Many artists prefer to travel to shows in a van. A van is not much longer than a car when it comes to parking and getting in and out of the show set-up area. But if you ever need to nap or camp overnight, you may have that option with a van, and not with a car. Also, when you are driving a van, you have better visibility, and everyone on the road can see you better. And, of course, you can haul a lot more stuff. The drawbacks are that you can’t drive as fast, and you use more gasoline.  I suggest that you not design a booth to fit your car, but get a vehicle that fits the booth design for maximum sales.

 

 

 

 

I don’t recommend sleeping in rest stops on the freeway at night. There is no security at a rest stop. If you are traveling and all rooms are booked up, park or nap in a truck stop. Almost every truck stop in the U. S welcomes RV's (and vans).  The bigger ones have 24-hour restaurants, and free showers with a fill-up. Most have a security guard and cleaner, safer bathrooms. The main drawback is truck noise. You either have to park as far from them as you can, or get earplugs. More and more truckers are husband and wife teams, and truck stops cater to them. The restaurants at some of them (Pilot) have all-you-can-eat buffets for $6.00, and phones at every booth. You can hook your computer up at a booth and check your email.  Just act like you own a big rig. ;-)

Travel tips

þ Never drive when sleepy.

McDonald’s coffee or Coca Cola will keep you awake! Better to be alive with bad coffee than dead with no coffee.

þ Keep a travel kit in your car.

A travel kit might be a bag with toothbrush, toothpaste, deodorant, floss, nail clippers, hairbrush, ibuprophen, aspirin, and vitamins. If you keep it in your car or van at all times, you won’t find that you have forgotten one of the above when you get to your show.

þ Keep a small fire extinguisher handy.

Always carry a fire extinguisher in your car or van. You never know when it might save your stock or someone’s life.  You can keep it in your booth during the show. I know one artist who had an engine fire in a gas station, and the fire extinguisher saved his life and the gas station!

þ Use mapquest.com to get a map to the show.

Usually the show promoter will give directions to the show, but mapquest can also give you directions from the show to your hotel.  www.mapquest.com

þ  Use an AAA or AARP card for an affordable room.

Either of these cards will save you at least 10%.  AARP cards are only available to people age 50 and over.

þ Always carry jumper cables.

You might leave your lights on, drain your battery, and need a jump-start. Get 12 gauge, not 14 or 16, and the longest ones they have.

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Carry a first aid kit.

If you keep a well-stocked kit in your car, you will have what you need to fix a blister, cut, or scraped knuckle on the road or at the show.

 

 

 

þ Check your tire pressure.

Carry a tire gauge.  Fully-inflated tires can increase your gas mileage 15%. While the tire is cool, inflate to about 5 lbs less than the maximum pressure stated on the side of the tire.

þ Check your spare tire for air.

You might be driving around with a flat spare tire, which would be no help at all if you have a flat. Check for a car jack and a tire iron. Get the big x shaped tire iron.  A woman can leverage one of these to loosen wheel nuts.  

þ Learn to change your own tire; anyone can do it.

Sure, AAA can change it, in an hour or so.  But you might miss the show. Carry gloves and coveralls to wear to change the tire. And keep a working flashlight in your vehicle. It is usually worthwhile to carry a floor jack if you have room. They are much faster and easier to use than the pneumatic or scissor type.

þ Learn how to check your car fluids.

No one else is going to check them for you all the time.  Learn how and where your oil, transmission, power steering, and wiper fluids are filled.

þ Clear your gas line with STP water remover.

Available at Kragen or Pep Boys.  Make sure the bottle says something about water removal from gas lines.  Water buildup comes from condensation or fog, and will make your engine run rough.

þ Carry a spare alternator belt.

The service station might not have the right one if yours breaks. Have someone show you where it is under your hood, so you can know if it is broken.  Usually the alternator light will come on. A salesman at NAPA Auto Parts will tell you which one fits your vehicle. They are fairly easy to replace, with just a wrench and a screwdriver.

þ Carry extra keys.

Keep them in a magnetic case under the car. Kragen Auto Supply sells the case.

Security on the road

þ Have a tow service--Allstate, AAA, or Good Sam.

The Good Sam Club Emergency Road Service is about $100 a year. This includes towing, gas, flat fixing, and lost keys.    Good Sam Emergency Road Service for RV’s phone number is  (800) 234-3450.  The number for AAA is (800) 922-8228.  Sears Allstate Motor Club, (866) 209-0394.

þ  Get an alarm for your vehicle

It should have an engine kill switch, remote, window stickers and a flashing red light visible to thieves when it is armed. Alarms cost less than $250 installed. I am always surprised that more artists don't have one.

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If you have a trailer, get a lock for it.

Paint a big number on the top and one on the street side. The one on top should be clear and big enough to be seen from a police helicopter.  Chances are your trailer will be found only a few miles from where it was stolen. If the police won’t help you find your trailer, you can always rent a helicopter and pilot and look for it yourself.

 

 

 

þ Don’t tell the motel clerk you have valuables.

 

 

Don’t even ask if they have a lock box, unless it is an extremely reputable motel or hotel chain.

þ Leave a light and TV on in your motel room.

A thief might think it is occupied when you are gone.

þ Don’t ever leave your key in your car ignition.

Don’t leave it in the ignition when you are loading in or packing up, or when your car is in your driveway, or gas station, or anywhere, ever. Also, don’t leave your cell phone on the dash.  Thieves will sometimes smash a car window just for a cell phone.

þ Use a steering wheel locking device.

If you don’t have a burglar alarm, at least get a steering wheel lock. The Club (Le Club) costs about $30, and might save all your stock.

þ Always park in a well-lit area.

Park in front of your door at the motel, or in front of or very near the lobby.  If you have a view of your vehicle, you can see by your flashing lights if the alarm is your car.

 

Flying to Craft Fairs

Flying to a craft fair has many advantages. You can do a show anywhere in the country, whenever you want. Otherwise, if you want to drive to shows in another part of the country, you would have to line up several in a row to make the trip worthwhile. Once you figure out how to fly to a show, you just pick the best ones around the country, fly there and fly back. Plus, you get more time in the shop.

 

Some crafts are easier to fly with than others. The lighter and smaller your product, the easier it is. But don’t let a heavier craft stop you from the big shows. The trick for big crafts is to ship your product by air cargo, rent a van when you get to the show, pick up the products with the van, and there you are, van and products, on the other side of the country, on the same day. The last time I checked, you could ship 250 pounds for $70 air cargo.  

 

 

 

Yes, you can fly with your canopy. It must have a cover on it.  Bring your products with you in your carry-on luggage, and check the canopy with the rest of your luggage at the baggage counter. At the counter you will have to pay $80 for each additional bag over two (depending on your airline. ATA is only $50).  Tipping the skycap to get more baggage on the plane no longer works since 9/11 security measures went into effect. 

 

You can travel with a portable table (made from tubing from Abstracta) in a large suitcase, a Contico fiberglass trunk with 4 wheels attached on the bottom with selling supplies in it, another suitcase with gift boxes and some clothes, and a canopy.  Use a rolling carry-on bag with a handle and a small daypack.  They both have to fit through the x-ray machine, and be small enough to stuff in the overheads. The next trick is getting it all into a cab, your car rental, or the airport shuttle.

Flying tips

þ Book roundtrip flights with www.travelocity.com.

At this time, they seem to be able to locate the best prices for round-trip airline tickets. Priceline is not good for flights because you usually have to get to the show by a certain time.

þ Use a travel agent if you need to book separate flights.

Use a travel agent if you are flying to one city and returning from another. They can also tell you if you will need a car or not to get from your hotel to the show, and they might find you a room at a pretty good price. A good agent that I use can be reached at (800) 835-5090.

þ Book rooms with www.priceline.com.

Offer a ridiculously low price; you just might get it. Start with three stars and $49.00.  You might get bumped up to a four star hotel.  Only ask for one area with your first offer.  You can’t raise your price without changing something, so if you don’t get your price you can add another area or reduce your stars and then slightly lower your bid. Two star motels like Extended Stay America often have kitchenettes, and sometimes go for a bid of $31.00.  Start early, because if your bids don’t work, you have to wait three days to bid again.

þ Print out your online airline and hotel reservations.

Take them with you. Sometimes the hotel or motel computer doesn’t get the information in time.

þ Use UPS to ship packages to your hotel.

70 lbs. from SF to NY costs $56, $40 if you have daily pickup.

þ Use your frequent flyer miles to fly to shows.

To find out more ways to get frequent flyer miles, go to www.mileageworkshop.com.  

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Keep your valuables in your carry-on bag.

Never leave anything valuable in your checked luggage.

þ Make a lightweight table with Abstracta ½” tubes.

Abstracta Structures (800) 223-7315    www.abstracta.com. You can use their tubes to assemble portable lightweight tables and cases for jewelry with glass or plastic tops, that fit in one suitcase.

 

 

 

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Use a collapsible water carrier for weight.

You can get a 5 gal. collapsible water carrier by Reliance (Winnipeg, Canada, R3H-1A4, or Marin Outdoors). Five gallons of water weighs 42 lbs., but the container weights only two lbs empty. Fill at a faucet or with a hose (food booths), and borrow a hand truck to carry it to your booth.

 

þ Use concrete blocks for weights.

If you are renting a car, get concrete blocks (and rope) at the local Home Depot for $5 each, use them for weights, and after the show, give them to another artist, take them back to Home Depot, or leave them in a dumpster or construction site.

 

     

 

                                    Concrete block covered with white tape

How to increase profits

 

If you are not making enough money selling your craft, here are a few ideas:    

 

1. Increase the price (improve the product). If your product has the right price, determined by your cost of materials, hourly wage, shop overhead costs, and retail selling costs, you can’t raise your price too much without improving the product. Everything has a “right price” regardless of who you are selling it to. Use the pricing spreadsheet in this book. Many crafts at fairs are priced too low, and a few too high. If your price is the right price, and seems too much for the customers who visit your booth, then you simply have to find a show with more affluent customers.

2. Reduce production costs. Find a way to get your materials for less money. The Internet is great for this. Another way to reduce production costs is to create less waste. Both buying too many materials, and throwing away scraps that could be sold, add up to increased production costs.

3. Increase production. Work faster or make more products at a time.

4. Make more sales. This means do more shows, or better shows, or make additional sales to other outlets.

5. Reduce overhead. Turn off the lights when you go out. One good helper is better than three not-good helpers. Keep the entire business production based in your garage.

 

More Craft Fair Tips

Selling directly to the user of your product will help you find out what the public wants.  Even if you eventually want to market your products by selling wholesale to craft galleries, you can test your product by doing craft fairs.  Of course, you can make a good living doing only craft fairs.

 

Before the show

þ Make a checklist of show necessities.

Check your list just before you leave home. There is a craft fair equipment list spreadsheet on page 83.

 

A sample list of show necessities:

Gift boxes

Hang tags

Bags

Blank notepads

VISA machine, thermal paper, and charger

VISA signage

Calculator

Sample of work in progress

Banner

Stakes

Booth sign

Statement of purpose (artist’s statement)

Price stickers

Duct tape

Rope

Pocket knife

 

 

Other handy stuff:

Phone charger

Camera, card, and batteries

Umbrella/raincoat

Mosquito repellant

Hand cleanser

Garbage bags (for end of the show clean-up)

Toilet paper (if the porta-Johns are out)

Gloves (for tire changing, etc.)

þ Call ahead if you are going to be late.

Otherwise, the promoter might give your space away.

 

 

Setting up for the show

þ Use a combination stool/tool box for tools.

If you dedicate a set of tools for shows, and keep them in a combination stool/toolbox, you will always have the tool you need and the stool also helps you put up walls, curtains, and lights at the show.

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Use a hand truck with large tires for easy loading.

Big wheels roll over cracks better.  Magline carts are the best hand trucks. They have big wheels, 2 or 4 wheel positions and hold up to 800 lbs. Priority Supply Company, 2127 Lake Lansing, Michigan 48912   (517) 374-8573.  

þ Never put tape on the legs of your E-Z UP.

The sticky residue left will prevent you from closing it down after the show.

þ Raise your canopy to its full height.   

Your booth will be more inviting and easier for tall people to get into. It lets in more light.  If you roll up your walls, put them on before raising the canopy. Use a lower height when it is windy or raining. It will keep some of the rain out and offer less wind resistance.

 

During the show

þ Be in your booth early.

If you spend 60 minutes in your booth before the show is open, ready to help customers, and stay open a little longer in the evening, it adds up to four extra hours in a three day show. Or, one extra show for every six shows, at no extra cost to you. This applies to unfenced outdoor shows.

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Show your customers what you start with.

A raw material in the hand is worth a thousand words—show a block of laminated wood, bag of clay, carving wax, etc.

þ Get a 50% deposit for custom work.

Full payment in advance is even better.

þ Never charge extra for gift boxes, etc.

The customer will think you are cheap and resent the charge. Customers like the word “free.”

þ Never criticize other craftspeople.

Nothing looks more unprofessional to customers or other craftspeople.

 

þ Give a small price break for multiple purchases.

Customers think they can get a better price if they are buying directly from the artist. But you have to be firm. You might be dealing with a “flea market” personality, someone who never ever pays full price. Ten percent is a reasonable amount for three or more items. Don’t offer it unless you think it might encourage them to buy. If your first reasonable discount offer is rejected, don’t make another. Explain again why your product is better.

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Never sell seconds.

They will come back to haunt you, especially if your customer gives them to someone else, who doesn’t know they are seconds, and brings them back to you to fix. It is better to have the “Everything I sell is perfect.” mentality. People don’t want flawed items for gifts.

þ Don’t use “Sale” signs at a fair.  

The public expects that the price asked reflects the artist’s time and materials. If items are on sale, you have to explain why. Many promoters forbid sale signs.

þ Start a mailing list.

 

 

At shows, collect names and addresses with a guest book, which is a nice address book or notebook, with large spaces for the customer to write big.  Copy into a database (there is one for Excel on page 87) all addresses from both the guest book and the checks you receive. Someday you will have a huge mailing list. At least once a year, send a postcard to everyone on your list, with information about your shows, web site, or new products.

þ Make your own guest book.

Print headings for name, address, phone, and email, horizontally on a sheet of paper, and have Kinko’s copy it and make a book for you, or put the copies in a 3-ring  binder.

þ Keep your display out of the aisles.

Don’t put anything in front of your booth, and don’t sit in the aisle, as it restricts the flow of traffic to the booth next to you.

þ Ask people what they think of your new items.

Do they like the color, the price, shape, etc.? Pay close attention to their comments. This type of feedback is one of the great advantages of doing a retail craft fair or art show.

þ Floor coverings make everyone more comfortable.

A 4’x 6’ oriental rug in darker colors will make your booth look more elegant and make your feet less tired at the end of the day. Tape the front edge.

 

þ Always fill out the show survey.

It is the best way to get the promoters to improve the show. Don’t just write your complaints.  Give helpful suggestions on how to improve the show. If they don’t know what is wrong, how can they fix it?

þ Don’t rush to pack up after a show ends.

After 45 minutes, 75 percent of the other artists will be gone and out of your way.  In addition, you might make a few more sales from latecomers. If you rush to get home after a show when you are tired, you are more likely to have an accident.

 

Avoiding theft

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Keep valuables out of reach.

Thieves will reach under your table or in from the back of your booth. Put your purse or camera out of sight in a rubbermaid or a large trunk. Attach your purse strap to a chair leg, table leg, canopy leg, etc. Purse-snatchers at fairs are looking for a purse that is unattached.

þ Don’t use a cash box.

Keep your money (at least all paper money) on your body, in a pocket, in a fanny pack, etc.  You can keep coins, but not bills, in a simple box for sales tax change.  It will make noise if it is stolen.

þ Separate large bills from small bills.

Don’t keep your money all in one place. Keep large bills in a separate safe place that is harder to access, a different pocket, etc. This keeps you from accidentally giving someone big bills with their change, or spilling the money on the ground.

þ You are more vulnerable to theft when packing up.

You are separated from your stuff when going to the car, and again when the stuff is in the car and you are back at the booth. Ask your neighbor to keep an eye on your booth.  Lock your car doors anytime valuables are inside.

þ Use a locked storage box or trunk.

A Contico fiberglass wheeled foot-locker can be locked in your booth with a padlock and bike chain attached to your table or something heavy. Put things like your credit card machine and calculator in it for overnight storage. If a drunk or prankster gets in your booth at night, they probably won’t try to get into it.

 

Health

þ At the first sign of a cold, take lots of vitamin C.

3,000 mgs a day should keep the cold at bay. Also take a multiple vitamin every day. Aspirin is known to reduce strokes and heart attacks.

þ Mercury vapor lighting can cause migraines.

These lights can also cause a green tinge in your booth. Use your own halogen lights to improve your lighting. Bring aspirins or Tylenol.

þ Do yoga stretches to avoid a bad back
 
þ Drink lots of water during a show.

Dehydration will cause headaches and soreness. Water also helps to combat the low humidity of indoor shows.  Don’t drink a lot of coffee unless you have a porta-John nearby.

 

 

 

 

Albuquerque Balloon Festival

 

 

 

 

List of Promoters of Multiple Craft Shows

 

Send all of the promoters in your area of the country a letter asking for information or an application.  Many of them screen (jury) you only once, then if they like your products, you can do as many of their shows as you want without being re-screened for each show.

 

 

PROMOTER ADDRESS CITY ST ZIP PHONE # OF SHOWS

DeSoto Caverns Park 5181 DeSoto Caverns Pkwy. Childersburg AL 35044 800-933-2283 2 outdoor

Elise Blackwell 116 Al-Jo Curve Selma AL 36701 334-874-8044 1 indoor, 2 outdoor

Hillbilly Corner Arts, Crafts, and Antiq 22530 Deer Run Rd. Hindsville AR 72738 501-789-5726 2 indoor, 2 outdoor

Fourth Avenue Merchants Assoc. 329 East 7th Street Tucson AZ 85705 520-624-5004 2 outdoor

Magic Bird Promotions P. O. Box 1803 Cave Creek AZ 85327 480-488-2014 1 indoor, 8 outdoor

Mill Ave. Merch. Association P. O. Box 53046 Phoenix AZ 85072 480-967-4877 4 outdoor

Mountain Artists Guild P. O. Box 12920 Prescott AZ 86304 520-445-2510 2 outdoor

The Events Group P. O. Box 328 Tempe AZ 85280 602-968-5353 5 outdoor

Thunderbird Artists 15648 N. Eagles Nest Dr. Fountain Hills AZ 85268 480-837-5637 7 outdoor

Beckmans Gift Show P. O. Box 2337 Los Angeles CA 90027 323-962-5424 4 indoor

California Artists P. O. Box 1963 Burlingame CA 94011 650-348-7699 15 outdoor

Clovis Chamber of Commerce 325 Pollasky Ave Clovis CA 93612 559-299-7273 3 indoor

Custom Productions P. O. Box 800524 Santa Clarita CA 91350 661-297-0119 1 indoor, 5 outdoor

Eckerstrom Productions 5151 Cold Springs Drive Forest Hill CA 95631 530-367-4557 10 outdoor

Hartman Studios P. O. Box 70160 Point Richmond CA 94807 510-970-3217 4 outdoor

Harvest Festival 601 North McDowell Blvd Petaluma CA 94954 707-778-6300 15 indoor

Jan Etre Presents P. O. Box 9188 Berkeley CA 94709 510-526-7363 1outdoor, 1 indoor

MLA Productions 1384 Weston Rd. Scotts Valley CA 95066 831-438-4751 3 outdoor

Pacific Fine Arts P. O. Box 280 Pine Grove CA 95665 209-296-1195 12 outdoor

Piecemaker Country Store 1720 Adams Ave. Costa Mesa CA 92626 714-691-3112 4 outdoor

R.G. Canning Attractions P. O. Box 400 Maywood CA 90270 310-835-9370 24 outdoor

Ray Leier 3051 Via Maderas Altadena CA 91001 626-797-6803 6 outdoor

Sandpiper Prod. P. O. Box S-3053 Carmel CA 93921 831-620-1281 2 outdoor

Scenic Art Shows P. O. Box 485 Chino CA 91708 909-623-5977 4 outdoor

Show Biz Productions 16520 Harbor Blvd. #D-2 Fountain Valley CA 92708 714-418-2000 4-6 indoor

Steve Powers and Company P. O. Box 1610 Pismo Beach CA 93448 805-481-7100 8 indoor

Village Artisans P. O. Box 1448 Bakersfield CA 93302 661-328-1943 2 indoor

West Coast Artists P. O. Box 4389 Chatsworth CA 91311 818-709-2907 22 outdoor

West Fest Productions 100 So. Sunrise Way #145 Palm Springs CA 92262 760-321-2148 20 outdoor

Adams County Historical Society 9601 Henderson Rd. Brighton CO 80601 303-659-7103 3 indoor

Chun Capital Hill People's Fair 1490 Lafayette St. #104 Denver CO 80218 303-830-1651 1 outdoor

Cortez Area C C P. O. Box 968 Cortez CO 81321 970-565-3414 2 outdoor

Denver Merchandise Mart 451 E. 58th Ave. #470 Denver CO 80216 303-292-6278 2 indoor

Downtown Denver Partnership 511 16th St. #200 Denver CO 80202 303-295-6330 3 outdoor

J&J Promotions 8490 W. Colfax Ave. Box 33 Lakewood CO 80215 303-232-7147 3 indoor

Keystone Art Festival P. O. Box 38 Keystone CO 80435 970-496-4570 1 outdoor

Howard Allan Events Ltd. 9695 W. Broward Blvd. Plantation FL 33324 954-472-3755 40 outdoor

Monticello-Jefferson C of  C 290 North Jefferson St. Monticello FL 32344 850-997-5552 2 outdoor

The Handmade in America Show 251 Creekside Dr. St. Augustine FL 32086 904-797-2600 20-30

United Production 125 5th Ave. N. Safety Harbor FL 34695 727-725-1562 4 outdoor

University of So. Fla. Bull Market 4202 E. Fowler Ave. Tampa FL 33620 813-974-5309 weekly

Andersonville Gld. P. O. Box 6 Andersonville GA 31711 912-924-2558 2 indoor

Blue Ridge Mountains Arts  P. O. Box 1016 Blue Ridge GA 30513 706-632-2144 2 outdoor

Contemporary Crafts Market 1142 Auahi St. #A7-2820 Honolulu HI 96814 808-422-7362 3 indoor

(in CA)

Downtown Davenport Assn. 102 So. Harrison St. Davenport IA 52801 319-322-6268 4 outdoor

Festivals International 508 4th Ave. No., Clearlake IA 50428 515-357-5177 2 indoor, 4 outdoor

Personalized Wood Products P. O. Box 193 Amana IA 52203 319-622-3100 2 outdoor

Buhl Chamber of Commerce 716 Hwy. 30 East Guhl ID 83316 208-543-6682 2 outdoor

American Society of Artists P. O. Box 1326 Palatine IL 60078 312-751-2500 12 indoor, 15 outdoor

Craft Show Promotions Inc. 302 Allen Ave. West Chicago IL 60186 630-293-3637 3 indoor, 9 outdoor

Bright Star Promotions 3428 Hill Vale Rd. Louisville KY 40241 502-423-STAR 20 indoor

Steinhauer Productions 16471 Hwy 40 Folsom LA 70437 504-796-5853 15 indoor, 2 outdoor

Artisan Promotions. 83 Mt. Vernon St. Boston MA 2108 617-742-3973 3 indoor

Americana Arts and Crafts 15 Cypress Street Hagerstown MD 21742 301-791-2346 7 outdoor

Buyers Market of American Craft 3000 Chestnut Ave. #300 Baltimore MD 21211 410-889-2933 2 indoor

Sugerloaf Mountain Works 200 Orchard Ridge Dr., #21 Gaithersburg MD 20878 301-990-1400 8 indoors

White Oak Plaza Merchants 923 So. 7 Hwy. Blue Springs MO 64015 816-118-6620 4 indoors

Forest Grove Community Club P. O. Box 16 Forest Grove MT 59411 406-538-8348 2 indoors, 1 outdoors

Lewiston C. of Commerce P. O. Box 818 Lewistown MT 59457 538-5436 2 outdooor

Bele Chere Festival P. O. Box 7148 Ashville NC 28802 828-259-5800 3 outdoor

High Country Art & Craft Guild P. O. Box 2854 Asheville NC 28802 828-254-0072 11 indoor, 1 outdoor

Downtown Comm P. O. Box 962 Fargo ND 58107 701-241-1570 1 in, 1 out

Huffman Productions Inc. P. O. Box 184 Boys Town NE 68010 402-331-2889 9 indoor

Kimberly Ann Kreations RR1 Box 200 Hoskins, NE 68740 402-565-4583 2 indoor

A.C. A. C. P. O. Box 650 Montclair NJ 7042 973-746-0091 6 outdoor

Rose Squared Inc. 12 Galaxy Ct. Belle Mead NJ 8502 908-874-5247 8 outdoor

Lovington Chamber of C. 201 S. Main Lovington NM 88260 505-396-5311 2 indoor-outdoor

Mill Museum P. O. Box 287 Cleveland NM 87115 505-387-2645 2 in/outdoor

The Walker Organization 3340 Wynn Rd. Suite D Las Vegas NV 89102 702-364-1174 3 indoor

Williams, Ltd. 4790 Caughlin Pkwy., #507 Reno NV 89509 775-324-6435 5 indooor, 25 outdoor

American Arts & Crafts Alliance 45 Riverside Drive #15H New York NY 10025 212-866-2239 3 outdoor, 2 indoor

American Craft Council 21 South Eltings Corner Rd Highland NY 12561 800-836-3470 7 indoor

Artrider Productions P. O. Box 28 Woodstock NY 12498 914-331-7900 8 indoor, 1 outdoor

Cord Shows, Ltd. 4 Whipporwill Lane Armonk NY 10504 914-273-4667 2 indoor, 2 outdoor

Designer Arts 114 Mill Road Red Hook NY 12571 800-660-1045 5 indoor

George Little Management Ten Bank Street White Plains NY 10606 914-421-3206 5 indoor

Soho Antiques Fair & Crafts P. O. Box 337 Garden City NY 11530 212-682-2000 52 weeks a year

Washington Sq. Outdoor Art 115 East 9th St. #7C NY NY 10003 212-982-6255 2 outdoor

Raab Enterprises P. O. Box 33428 N. Royalton OH 44133 440-237-3424 30 indoor

Tom Danner Event Mgmt. P. O. Box 1473 Marion OH 43302 740-389-5707 2 indoor

Benton County Fairgrounds 110 SW 53rd St. Corvallis OR 97333 541-757-1521 6 indoor, 1 outdoor

Brookings Chamber P. O. Box 940 Brookings OR 97415 541-469-3181 1 indoor, 1 outdoor

Eugene Sat, Mkt.  76 W. Broadway Eugene OR 97401 541-686-8885 14 in/35 out

Jefferson County Fair P. O. Box 237 Madras OR 97741 541-475-4460 2 indoors

Oregon Homecrafters  P. O. Box 70333 Eugene OR 97401 541-343-6856 5 indoors

Rogue Valley  P. O. Box 4041 Medford OR 97501 888-826-9868 weekly

Sisters Area C of C P. O. Box 430 Sisters OR 97759 541-549-0251 1 indoors, 4 outdoors

Umatilla County Fair P. O. Box 94 Hermiston OR 97838 541-567-8115 1 indoors, 1 outdoors

Umpqa Valley Arts Association P. O. Box 1105 Roseburg OR 97470 541-672-2532 2 indoors, 2 outdoors

BJ Promotions Belle Shilling RR#1, Box 1772 Union Dale PA 18470 570-679-3670 40 indoors

Heritage Markets P. O. Box 389 Carlisle PA 17013 717-249-9404 15 indoors

Renaissance Craftables 541 Woodland Dr. Radnor PA 19087 610-687-8535 4 indoors, 4 outdoors

Country Fairs 6311 So. Canyon Rd. Rapid City SD 57702 605-343-8783 5 indoors, 1 outdoors

Festival in the Park P. O. Box 648 Spearfish SD 57783 605-642-2311 1 indoors, 1 outdoors

Esau, Inc. P. O. Box 50096 Knoxville TN 37950 865-588-1233 2 indoors

Tennessee Assoc of Craft Artists P. O. Box 120066 Nashville TN 37212 615-665-0502 3 outdoors

American Country Shows P. O. Box 1129 Fredericks-burg TX 78624 830-997-2774 25 indoors

Art Promotion Counselors P. O. Box 776 Alamo TX 78516 956-787-6996 30-40 indoors

Events Mgmt. Group, Inc. P. O. Box 8845 Virginia Beach VA 23450 757-486-0220 3 indoor

Craft Producers P. O. Box 300 Charlotte VT 5445 802-425-3399 3 indoors, 9 outdoors

Jim Custer Enterprises, Inc. P. O. Box 14987 Spokane WA 99206 509-924-0588 4 indoors

Metro Parks, Tacoma 4702 So 19th St. Tacoma WA 98405 253-591-5484 3 outdoors

 

One Reel P. O. Box 9750 Seattle WA 98109 206-281-8111 2 outdoors

Showcase Northwest P. O. Box 2815 Kirkland WA 98083 800-521-7469 3 indoors

Wisconsin Indian Head Country,Inc. P. O. Box 628 Chetec WI 54728 715-924-2970 5 indoors, 4 outdoors

 

 

 

Afternoon                  by John C. Reiger    www.johnreigerpottery.com

 

My eyes droop, the book slips.

“Yep, I made ‘em,” mumble lips.

 

Oh yes, I made them, every one.

Pitchers and bowls, by the ton.

 

And here I sit, in this fair spot,

Trying hard to sell the lot.

 

Or a few, or two, or even one.

To pay the rent, or just for fun.

 

This morning so full of hopes,

But by now I’m on the ropes.

 

It’s four o’clock—the hours creep.

What will happen if I sleep?

 

And what will happen if I don’t?

Nothing! But then…  So I won’t.

 

Oh, Oh, a customer. Look alive!

Sit up. Stand up. Speil that jive.

 

Nothing doing! There she goes.

Ease back, relax, time to dose.

 

And as my fair hopes decompose,

I seek relief in rhythmic prose.

 

No use, against the fates, to rail.

But, oh, she’s back. At last a sale.

 

 

 

 

Selling to Stores and Galleries

Wholesale Marketing

Craftspeople who want to stay at home working in the shop might try to get retail stores to sell their crafts. This is called wholesale marketing.  If you make a product that usually sells for $40 at a craft fair, your wholesale price would be $20. The normal markup for a retail store is double the price they paid for the product.  They would then sell it for $40, just like you do at shows.  If the product cost you $5 to produce (in parts and labor), you would net $15 if you sold it wholesale and $35 if you sold it at a craft fair.  However, after you calculate your costs for doing the fair, you might only end up with a profit of $20 for your fair sale, but that is still more than the $15 you would make by selling wholesale. The reality is that most stores can sell your product for a little more than you can get it for at a show. The store might be able to get $50, so you could wholesale it to them for $25, and then you would net $20 profit either way.

 

Some store owners will be upset if you sell your product at a craft fair nearby for less than they are charging in the store.  You often entice buyers at a fair by your presence alone – as the working artist – and also by selling your product to them a little cheaper than they might pay in a store.  Customers know they can return your product to a store, but they might not be able to return it to you since the fair will not be there every week.  So they might expect to pay you less, directly. If a store complains, you will just have to raise your price at the fair to match theirs for that weekend.

 

 

 

One way to get your product into a store is to call and set up a meeting with the buyer to see your craftwork.  Many stores set aside a specific day of the week when they look at new work.

 

If you feel intimidated by store buyers, you can hire a professional sales representative to interact with them for you. Sales reps will take samples of your work, along with the samples of other craftspeople they represent, to all of the galleries and shops in their territory.  The store will place their order with the rep, who will send the order to you.  You ship the crafts directly to the store, and when you are paid by the store you send the rep a commission, usually 15% on a monthly basis.  

 

You (or your sales rep) can also rent space at a gift show or trade show to sell your work. Some shows specialize in crafts, some have a handmade section, and some just mix you in with all the other products, whether handmade, machine-made or imported. These shows are only open to wholesale buyers from stores, and the craftsperson is only allowed to bring samples and take orders, but not to sell directly to the customers to take with them.  The trade show seller displays the sample crafts, hands out business cards, collects business cards, and takes orders to be shipped at some date in the future.  These shows usually charge about $20 per square foot for the booth displays, feature a thousand or more booths, and host anywhere from 5,000 to 50,000 buyers from retail stores around the country.

If you don’t want to deal with the cost and hassle of presenting your work at a trade show, you can try to reach the store buyers by direct mail.  Send them a catalog of your products and a pricelist, or send them a postcard directing them to your web site.  You will need a mailing list of quality galleries.

 

 

 

You can produce your own list from the business cards you collected from doing trade shows, making personal visits, from ads seen in tourist magazines, and from the list in the back of this book on page 145. A mailing of 1,000 postcards will cost $170 for the cards and $230 for the postage.  For less than the cost of one show you can have a photo of your best-selling craft product in the hands of 1,000 gallery owners.

 

Some craftspeople sell both wholesale to stores and retail at fairs, or they try wholesaling for a while and later go back to fairs.  Advantages of wholesaling include less travel and larger orders at a time.  Stores are open regularly, all year long, in all kinds of weather, and most have experienced sales people.  Disadvantages include delays in getting paid because the stores expect to pay in 30 or 90 days, and having to make the same thing over and over.

 

Trade Show Producers

Write these shows for more information.

 

BMAC Buyers Markets of American Crafts/The Rosen Group, Inc.

300 Chestnut Ave., Suite 300,  Baltimore, MD 21211 (410) 889-2933  Handmade in U.S.A.

2 wholesale-only only shows, February and August, in Philadelphia. 1600 booths. Medium to high quality.

 

GLM George Little Management, Inc.

10 Bank St., Suite 1200, White Plains, NY 10606 (914) 421-3200    Shows all over the country, with both imports and handmade crafts.

 

ACC American Craft Council Fairs/American Craft Enterprises Marketing

21 S. Eltings Corner Rd.,  Highland, NY 12528 (800) 836-3470    Handmade only. 1 wholesale show combined with a retail show in February in Baltimore, just after the BMAC show. Very high quality.

 

Beckman’s Gift Shows

Box 27337,  Los Angeles, CA  90027 (213) 962-5424      Handmade crafts and imports. For the Chicago shows, call 800-677-6278.

 

OASIS

1130 E. Missouri Ave., Suite 750, Phoenix, AZ 85014 (800) 344-8447    

 

ACRE American Craft Retailers Expo

New show in Las Vegas in May, put on by wholesalecrafts.com.  888-427-2381

 

Wholesale Tips

Trade shows

þ You have to do a wholesale show several times for it to start to pay off.

 

 

Gallery owners have to get to know you and trust you. Some gallery owners only purchase at trade shows.

þ Attend a show as a guest.

Make notes about booth designs and price points of products similar to yours. To get in, you might have to register as if you have a store.

þ Make your booth interesting.

When a buyer walks by, they scan your booth. They spend only about three seconds deciding whether to visit your booth or not. If nothing grabs their attention, they will keep walking.

þ Mail postcards before the show.

Pre-show mailings will help you to have a good show. If it is your first show, you might be able to arrange for the promoter to mail your postcards to their mailing list of stores in your category.

þ Trade Show Displays

Big folding banner stands and very lightweight tables.  www.postergarden.com 800-707-2004

þ Use Zippy Mats for booth floors.

Stacking interlocking floor rubber pieces, usually 12” by 12”, make a comfortable floor in your booth for you and your customers. Wandix International, 800-385-6855 www.wandix.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

During the trade show

þ Get to know more about the gallery.

Ask the buyer about the gallery location, style, owner’s preferences. “Where is your store?  Do you sell similar crafts? How long have you been in business?  Are you involved in management?”

þ Hand out cards with your booth number.

When there are hundreds of booths, buyers get confused when trying to find your booth again.

þ Make your own wholesale line sheet.

Use 4 pages—one is a photo of your craft products, one is for terms, warranty, shipping information, one is a price list, and one is an artist’s statement. Be sure your name, address, phone number, fax, and email address is on every page of material you give the customer. Place a copyright notice on each page (All designs copyright by Joe Artisan Design 2007). Also put the notice on your postcards and your product.

þ Recommend a starter order or show special.

This will help the store to get to know your products.  Offer a discount of 10% for purchasing the complete starter order. Have signage to describe the show special displayed in your booth.

þ Tell buyers what’s new in your booth.

 

 

They can always order the old stuff over the phone (even though they probably won’t, waiting instead for you to call them!) Have a clipboard in your hand and start writing the customer’s name and address on an order form, as you are talking to them

þ Make customers ask for a brochure.

Don’t leave them within reach, but in sight. Get the customer’s card for each brochure given out. No card, no brochure.

þ Pre-qualify your customer.

Some of the attendees at trade shows do not have stores and are just looking for a good deal. Authentic wholesale buyers usually have clipboards and are wearing comfortable shoes. Know who you are talking to.  Find out from the buyer which other craftspeople at the show they have bought from.

þ Wholesale buyers are drawn to presentation.  

They also like an artist who is well dressed and business-like.  Casual dress is for craft shows.

þ Don’t sit. smoke, talk on the phone, or chew gum

If you act bored, you will be. So will your customers.

 

 

 

þ Make an information sheet for gallery owners.

Gallery workers need knowledge about how you make your products. They can display it with your products so they don’t have to think about it. Similar to an artist statement, the display should have your photo on it, and information about what special techniques you use to make the product. Leave your address off of it.  The store wants the customer to get more from them, not you.

þ Write down buyer comments.

Eavesdrop on people who are visiting your booth, and write down comments made to you directly. You can study the comments later, to see what you can do to improve your sales.

þ Don’t print too many catalogs.

Even if a show has 20,000 attendees, only 300 might stop at your booth.  You won’t need thousands of catalogs.

þ Don’t take more orders than you can handle.

 

 

Before a wholesale show, calculate how many items you can make in the next six months. Never promise a delivery date you can’t keep. Your goal is to ship on time.

þ After the first order, ask your customers to reorder.

Call them three times a year.   “Hi, I’m _____, from Company. I missed you at the wholesale show. How’s your inventory? Can I help you out? Do you need stock? If you want product I have to get you on the production schedule. Do you have any old product to exchange?”

 

Wholesale business

þ Get cash for first order.

The buyer can use a check or credit card.  No C. O. D.  Second order net 15 or net 30, if you check their three references.  If the retailer wants you to make an exception, such as net 45, they will want exceptions later. If they need net 45, they can use a credit card. If they have a poor credit history, have them prepay with a check, and wait for it to clear.

þ Don’t ship a new order until last order is paid in full.

Tell the buyer of this policy when they place their first order.

þ Don’t require huge minimums.

Large minimum orders discourage small stores.  You want to get your crafts in stores and keep them in stores.  Selling to many small companies is also somewhat safer than selling to just a few large companies. If a large company goes bankrupt when owing you money, you could be in big trouble.

 

 

 

þ Give area exclusivity on a trial basis.

Tell your buyer that if sales are unsatisfactory in their store after three or four months, you will sell to other stores in their area. If you commit to exclusivity, the store must commit to making enough sales to make it worthwhile for you.

þ Put all terms on the order form.

When buyer signs the order, it indicates that they have read the terms, whether they have or not.

þ Offer buyers a refund or exchange.

Offer a full refund within one year for items that don’t sell.

þ Buy or make a triplicate sales receipts book.

Give one copy to customer at show, one for your files, and one to ship with the order as an invoice. Make sure it has spaces for the delivery date, signature date, contact name, preferred terms, and the customer’s signature. If you have a computer invoice program, you only need a duplicate sales book.  You copy the order information into your invoice program when you get home. I recommend ProVenture Invoices ($19.95, Office Depot).

þ Collect past due invoices by phone.

Call and say, “My records show that you owe me x dollars. Will you send me a check for the full amount today?”  Then send a letter, then phone, another letter, phone, letter. Ask for a credit card number to keep until you get the full amount. If you don’t get paid, call a lawyer, and file suit.

þ Deliver the order on time.

If you can’t deliver the order on time, call the buyer, apologize, and reschedule. When order is late, you could say, “I put in a little extra effort to make sure that you got some unique items.”

Wholesale reps

þ Find sales reps at trade shows.  

Look for reps with handcrafted items that compliment (but don’t compete directly with) yours.

þ Get a directory of sales representives.

Directory of Wholesale Reps for Craft Professionals.

http://www.craftassoc.com/reps.html    800-715-9594

þ Get references from the sales rep.

Be sure to call the references. Ask them if the rep is reliable, productive, etc.

þ Check your sales reps business contacts.

Make sure he or she deals with the type of galleries that sell your type of products.

 

 

More wholesale tips

þ Sell online at a wholesale web site.

www.wholesalecrafts.com is a web site for marketing to retailers. You can get a temporary ID and password to view the site by calling Nancy Vince at 888-427-2381 or email nancy@wholesale crafts.com.  She says she has more than 1,000 artists and registered more than 13,000 retailers.

þ Check out American Style magazine.

They have lots of advertising for craft galleries, and you can add the gallery addresses to your mailing list.

þ Visit galleries when traveling.

Get the business cards of craft galleries that could be a match for your products.

þ Don’t just walk into a gallery with your craft products.

Send photos first, with a cover letter, then schedule a meeting with the buyer. It shows that you are a professional. At the very least, call first.

þ Make a gallery mailing list at the library.

Your local library has every telephone Yellow Pages in the country on microfiche.  Look for craft galleries, museums, or gift shops, and write down the address.  

þ Set business hours for your home business.

Self-discipline is the hardest part of being self-employed. Find out what wastes time. Use a message machine that says you are in the shop when you are working, so you won’t be disturbed.

þ Track your shipping.

You can track your packages online at www.packtrack.com. They track UPS, FedEx, and Airborne. UPS  100 weight service, 250 lbs, and $300.  800 pickups  www.ups.com  Yellow Freight  800-610-6500 www.myyellow.com.  

 

Other Markets

þ Put your crafts in consignment stores

One way to get your creations into stores is to place them there on consignment. This means that the store does not pay you until they sell the item. If they don’t sell it in a reasonable amount of time, you take it back. If they do sell it, they give you 60% of the amount they got for it. The reason you get more than the 50% you would get from a direct sale to a store is that you don’t get your money right away, and risk having to take your product back (or not getting paid). The consignment store pays you more after the sale because they were able to place your item on their shelves, trying it out at no risk to themselves. Most artists and craftspeople don't do consignment unless they really like the store. 

 

þ Sell to department stores.

Contact the store nearest you and get the name and number of the buyer for your region.

þ Sell innovative crafts to museum gift shops.

Museum Store Association has a trade show just for museum gift shop buyers.  www.museumdistrict.com  303-329-6968.

þ Try home shopping networks.

If you are set up to deliver quantities in the order of 20,000 (wholesale) at a time, you might want to contact QVC.  Your product will reach 89 million homes simultaneously in 50 states.  You only need to send a photo and description to get an appointment for an evaluation.  Your product must retail for $15.00 or more.  The entire $20,000 worth of products have to be in their warehouse before you go on the air. You can send a sample but it won’t be returned. Contact: Guthy-Renker Corp, 115 Drummond Dr., Wilmington, DE 19808  1-888-NEW ITEM     www.qvcproductsearch.com

þ Sell your products to catalogs.

Lots of catalogs are listed at www.catalogsfroma-z.com and www.catalogcity.com.  Check out “Secrets to Marketing Your Products to Catalog Companies,”
by
Jack Briscoe Jr. at www.amazon.com

þ Sell your crafts on etsy.com.

200,000 registered users watch 40,000 art and craft sellers that have set up a shop online here.  Sellers join free, pay 20 cents to list each item, and etsy.com takes 3.5% of each sale. Other web sites for artists include www.lov.li, and www.dwanda.com in Europe.

þ Join a professional organization.

They usually have a magazine.  For example, American Association of Woodturners.  (612) 484-9094  aaw@rtpnet.org  It looks good on your artist’s statement and your resume, and you can deduct the trips to the annual convention. Also subscribe to leading craft magazines, such as Crafts Report and Sunshine Artists.

 

 

 

 

Lincoln Center, New York City, NYSelling Online

In the past 5 years, shopping on the Internet has increased to the tune of billions of dollars a year.  Selling your crafts on the Internet is easier than ever, but it is not the complete solution for selling craft for more than a very few people.  The experience of buying a handmade creation directly from the craftsperson at a fair is not easy to recreate on the Internet.

 

The primary method of selling on the Internet is from your own web site.  You have to make or have someone make you a web site, set it up to receive payments, and let customers know about it.

 

Making your own web site is not hard with products like Microsoft FrontPage and Dreamweaver.  All a web site needs is text, images, an order form, and navigation buttons.  FrontPage handles all of these needs in a very efficient way.  Becoming good at using a web site creation program is like being good at using a word processing program.  Once you learn the basics, it is just another skill to help you with your marketing.  With FrontPage you will never have to learn html, java, flash, or animated gifs. I have created a complete web site with home page, product page, faq (frequently asked questions) page, and order form page, in less than an hour with this software.

 

You can always hire someone to make your web site, and try to get them to understand what you are trying to represent on your site.  This works well for some artists.  But what happens when the Webmaster decides not to work on your site anymore, or you loose track of them?  It is better to learn the few skills needed to make your own web site, then you can modify it as much as you want whenever you want.  

 

Receiving payments on the Internet is easy if you already take credit cards.  The customer just emails or calls you with the credit card information. Otherwise, you can set your site up with PayPal buttons, and PayPal will take the credit cards and give you the money, for a small fee.

 

You let customers know about your web site by putting it on all of your correspondence, your email, your business cards, and your hangtags.  You might put a sign with your web site name in your booth.  Contact the various search engines and tell them about your web site.  

 

I don’t think putting your crafts on so-called web galleries is very rewarding.  I have looked at quite a few of them, and put my products on a couple of them without success.  The products get lost among all the other crafts on the web site.  But this is my experience.  There may be some very successful web galleries and web catalogs online, but I haven’t found them yet.

 

Some artists are having limited success with putting their products on eBay.  The problem with eBay is that there are many people selling similar products to yours for much less money.  You have to convince the potential buyer to buy your more expensive item by telling them how and why it is superior to the other products on eBay.  eBay is, after all, the world’s largest flea market.  It is not a craft gallery.

 

 

 

Internet Tips

Making your own web site  

þ Get your own domain name

This currently costs about $70, which registers it for two years, and the cost is $35/year thereafter. To get a domain name, go to networksolutions.com or internic.net. When you control your own domain name, then you will be notified when it expires. You can get one free with most web hosts.

þ Find a good Internet Service Provider

The ISP (web host) that I use is http://www.hostexcellence.com/  They charge $8 a month, and have all the FrontPage extensions, so you don’t have to worry which version of FrontPage you use.  They also have excellent and fast customer service.  

þ

 

Learn FrontPage for Windows.

FrontPage 2003 costs under $125.00 ($60 on eBay) and is fairly easy to learn. Get the book FrontPage in 24 hours. Or you can learn GoLive from Adobe, which costs $160.00.  Lots of learning aids for FrontPage and GoLive on eBay.

þ Study good web design.

Learn what make for bad web design, and avoid it. Go to www.webpagesthatsuck.com.  Really!

 

 

 

þ Use a white background on your web pages.

Have you ever tried to read white text on a black background?

þ Use Adobe Elements for your photos.

Elements is free with some printers and scanners, otherwise it is available from Costco or CompUSA for under $100.  It has all the features you need to retouch photos and size them for your web site or email.

þ

 

Your web images should be 50K or less.

FrontPage has a feature which shows how long a page will take to download on slow (28 kps) connections. Use Elements or Photoshop to resize your photos to 5”x7” at 72dpi.  

þ Don’t use fancy animation or music.

It takes too long to download for the millions of people out there who still have a slow phone internet connection.

þ Get listed with search engines.

Go to “add url” buttons on Yahoo, Google, or Exite to add your site.  Most Search engines use the first 12 or 15 words of text on your page.  Make them relevant.  Don’t waste them on “Welcome to my home page.”  

þ Always use metatags.

Use metatags on all of your pages. In HTML view, insert them after the title. Example: <META NAME="Keywords" CONTENT="wood, Box, handmade, handcrafted, oak, gift, unique">

<META NAME="Description" CONTENT="Handmade wood boxes make excellent gifts for all occasions.">

þ Don’t list all of your craft shows on your site.

New craftspeople in your specialty might find your web site, apply to all of your shows, get in some of them, and either take your place or sell next to you and take half of your money in sales.  This has happened to me twice.  The huge loss of money hardly compensates for the occasional customer who went to your site to see where you were going to be next.  You can send your best customers cards or email them about your upcoming shows. I recommend listing only your next couple of shows on your web site, and not showing all of your designs.

þ Use AOL for your email.

There are lots of so-called free email providers, Yahoo and Hotmail to name a couple.  But AOL has reliability, and some neat email tricks, such as being able to unsend your email after it has been sent.  I have used AOL since 1995 and have never lost any mail due to “box filled up,” etc. If you use AOL from your ISP, it is $15.00 a month or less. AOL mail is now free.

 

 

 

þ Have a separate email address from your web site email.

If your email is connected to your web site (info@yourweb site.com) and your server goes down, you won’t get any mail. You also get lots of junk mail, which sometimes fills your box, and then you won’t even know you had an order.

þ Use  PayPal’s free shopping cart.

At www.paypal.com, you can get either “buy now” buttons for each product, or a shopping cart for all of your products.  It is easy to set up, and it is free.  You just describe the item at the PayPal merchant site, then cut and paste the code in your html view to create a button next to the product. PayPal handles the rest, giving the customer a receipt and putting the money in your account.

þ Make an order form page.

Some customers don’t like or use PayPal.  You can make your own order form from scratch with FrontPage in a few minutes. Select Insert, then Form. Be sure to right-click on the form you have made and select “form properties” and “no” to send orders to your email address.

þ Offer a money-back guarantee on your web site.

The biggest problem with selling on a web site is credibility in the eyes of the buyer.  A guarantee might ease their concerns.

þ Make a separate web page for wholesale customers.

To put wholesale prices on your site, just make a page called yoursite.com/wholesale.htm, and tell your stores about it.  Your retail customers won’t know it is there if it isn’t linked to the rest of your web pages.

þ Get low-priced web site design from students.

Contact a local college to find a student web site designer who needs exposure. They might be willing to help you for less money.

 

 

Selling on eBay

þ  Use low-res pictures.

Resize and crop your digital pictures with Elements or Photoshop.  Have a separate folder on your computer for your eBay photos. You can use a film camera and have your pictures delivered to you on a cd, or buy an inexpensive 3.2 megapixel camera with a macro lens for under $100.

þ  Sell your extra supplies on ebay

This is a good way to get rid of unused tools and extra parts that you bought too many of.  It helps your cash flow and makes the workshop easier to clean. Start these auctions at $ .99.  There are thousands of craftspeople checking ebay every day.

þ

 

 Use your artist’s statement for “About Me.”

You can cut and paste your artist statement to eBay’s “About Me” page, to help your customers get to know you better.

þ  Be descriptive!

eBay does not charge more for long descriptions.  You can go into great depth about how you make it, what materials you use, and how successful you are at shows. Use testimonials. Not everyone will read it all, but serious buyers will.

þ  Use bulleted text in descriptions of your product.

Customers don’t want to or don’t have time to read large blocks of text.

þ  Use Turbo Lister for multiple listings.

It is a free program from eBay.  You can choose from hundreds of templates, use the same shipping information for all listings, and upload all of your listings at once. You can also schedule listings for later automatic uploading.

þ  List on Thursday for 10 days.

You will have two full weekends for people to see your product, for only a few cents more than a normal listing.  The listing will end on Sunday, when people are home. If you list in the evening, more people will be home to bid as the auction closes.

þ Always use Delivery Confirmation

The customer cannot claim that he or she didn’t get the package.  It only costs 45 cents.  If you buy your priority mail shipping online with “Click N Ship” at www.usps.com,  or if you buy the postage with paypal by clicking on the Ship button on your Papal transaction list, delivery confirmation is free. Otherwise you have to go to the post office. If the item is over  $50.00, always insure it.

þ Take PayPal for faster eBay sales.

You have to get set up for PayPal, at www.paypal.com. This service is almost indispensable for internet transactions.  Now that eBay owns PayPal, the service is even more reliable (and accountable)!  Don’t forget that cookies on your computer must be active to use it.General Business and Marketing Tips

Bookkeeping

þ

 

Use a Dome Simplified Monthly Bookkeeping Record.

You can get a Dome book (or Atlas Monthly Bookkeeping Book) at Office Depot or Office Max, (800) 432-4352. You simply enter monthly expenditures on the left, income on the right, and add up the totals at the end of the year or tax time. There are two extra pages for expenses for each month.  Just tear them out and write the name of the month in the space provided on the income side for each month.

þ You don’t need separate account numbers.

 

 

If the item is deductible, simply write it down in your Dome book. All that is needed for a deduction is a date, item, and amount (and a receipt).

þ Use basic receipt books.

Use a rubber stamp with your company name and address, phone number and email. Don’t bother with the cost of getting receipt books printed. Gallery buyers are not as impressed with your sales forms and invoices, as they are by timely delivery and fast turnovers.

þ Fill out your phone orders by hand.

You will never again have to hate your computer for not booting up in time to take the order.  And, you won’t have to hate your printer for not working when you need it.  

þ Back up your mailing list.

Keep duplicates (including account information) in a place separate from your workplace or office. In case of fire, you won’t have to recreate everything.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Taxes

þ You have to pay taxes if you have a business.

The IRS considers a business as any activity that creates a profit in 2 out of 5 years.  If you don’t make any profit with your crafts, it is considered a hobby and you can’t deduct your craft-related expenses.

þ  Find out what is deductible.

The Schedule C tax form has a list of deductions.  A Dome book also has a list of everything that is deductible. The bottom line is, if you use it to assist your business, deduct it.

þ Get tax information free direct from IRS.

Get IRS publication 334 “Tax Guide for Small Business” to get the facts about your taxes.

þ Deduct credit card interest.

Your business credit cards don’t have to be in your business name, just earmarked for business use. All of the interest on a business credit card can be deducted on your Schedule C. You should use your credit card for materials only if you can pay it off in three months.

þ Don’t deduct for business use of your home.

Since this is the most abused tax deduction, it is a red flag for the IRS, and the deduction (usually a percentage of the rent for a room in your house) is usually not large enough to be worth it.

þ Check if a “Home Occupation”  business license is required.

 

 

In most cities, even if you don’t have employees, you might still need a business license to work out of your home. If you have employees, or the public comes to your studio, you will need to have your studio in a commercial zone.

þ Get an employee identification number.

If you have employees, you need an employee identification number (EIN) from the IRS. 1-800-829-4933. If you don’t have employees, you can use your social security number for business purposes anytime an EIN is asked for.

þ Keep track of your bank deposits.

In a field audit, the IRS will add up your bank deposits for the year and compare them with your stated income.

þ Get a state sales tax number or ID.

Write, call, or go to the state office of taxation in your state. This is different from a fictitious name statement, which you get from your county offices.

Copyright

þ Copyright your work.

Copyright costs $20.00 and protects the graphic or sculptural works for 70 years after the artist’s death. Copyright forms are free and available from Library of Congress, U. S. Copyright Office. 202-707-9100. Their general information number is 202-479-0700.  www.lcweb.loc.gov/copyright.

þ Use a design patent to protect your work.

A design patent is good for 14 years. You can’t get a design patent for anything that has been in public view for over a year.  www.uspto.gov  202-707-9100

þ Copyright your catalog with a “Visual Arts” form.

All of your designs will be protected for your life plus 70 years.  www.loc.gov/copyright.

þ Use a “TM” after your company name.

Do this even if you haven’t registered the name yet, but intend to.

þ

 

Always put a copyright notice on your work.

“Copyright Bob Smith, 2007”.  The date refers to the first use of your product. Put it in your catalogs.  

þ If someone is copying you, let him or her know.

Tell them that under the law, you are entitled to their profits. They might not even know they are copying you.

þ Protect function with a utility patent.

You can’t copyright function but you can protect it. Utility patents are good for 18 years. www.uspto.gov.

 

Promotion

þ Pick up newspapers at every show you do.

Take one home with you.  Next year, send them a press release.  People will come up to your booth and say they saw you in the paper.

þ Make your own press release.

A press release is one or two pages of information. Tell who, what, where, why, when, etc. Explain why your method or style of craftsmanship is unique or what you are doing to save the planet.  A press release is always double-spaced. Write “For Immediate Release” at the top, then put your contact information.  There is a sample of a press release in the spreadsheets section of this book.

 

 

þ Send a cover letter with your press release.

Tell the editor why their readers need to know about you. Include a glossy black-and-white 5x7 or 8x10 photograph of you and your shop and a photograph of your craft. You should take the photos in color in case you ever need color, then print them in black and white.  (You can’t print color from a black and white photo.)

þ Never write on the back of a publicity photo.

It can’t be reproduced, as the writing will show through. Write or use a rubber stamp on a label, then put the label on the back of the photo.

þ Use Microsoft Publisher for brochures.

Microsoft Publisher is very useful for artist statements, postcards, stationery, catalogs, brochures, hang tags, etc.  Some online printers such as www.printing4less.com can use your uploaded Publisher files.

þ Use first class mail for mailing your cards and brochures.

Bulk mail only saves you about ten cents a letter and it is more likely to be unread. After you spend $125 for a bulk mail application, $125 for an annual fee, and all the time to separate your mail by zip code, have you really saved any money? Bulk mail rates are at www.usps.com/directmail/

Pricing

þ Never under-price your work.

You might make more sales, but you will be broke at the end of the year. Never reduce your price unless you can cut your costs (both materials and labor).  Selling out is not always a good thing.  If your product sells out at a show the first day, it was priced too low.

þ  Find your best market.

If your product price is too high for your market, find another market. Sell your one-of-a-kind pieces through a craft gallery, where your product is not compared to products at Target or Wal-Mart.

þ Have multiple price points.

If you have priced for low income, middle income, and high-end customers, you will always make money at a show.

þ Put price stickers on every product you sell.

You don’t want the customer to think you are making up the price.  And, you won’t waste time with a customer who couldn’t afford the item. Plus, you don’t have to remember all the prices.

 

 

 

 

 

Miscellaneous

þ Write down where you want to be in 5 years.

Make goals for 3 months, 1 year, and 5 years.  The simple act of writing it down programs the subconscious to take actions that head toward your direction.

þ Test market every new product.

 

 

Craft fairs and wholesale trade shows are very helpful for product research. Don’t make a hundred until you have sold a couple.

þ Write down a goal for production each day.

You can do this last thing in the evening before, or first thing in the morning.

þ Save 10% of the gross from every show.  

This adds up.  Don’t spend it on anything. Save it for your retirement.

þ Set business hours for your home business.

Self-discipline is the hardest part of being self-employed. Find out what wastes time. Use a message machine that says you are in the shop when you are working, so you won’t be disturbed.

 

 

 

 

 

Strawberry Festival, Oxnard, CaliforniaUseful Addresses

Display

P. O. Box 717, Matawan, NJ 07747   (800) 524-0576

(Free 20-page catalog)   Fire retardant, showcases, fitted table covers, booth signs, alarms

Abstracta Structures, Inc.

347 5th Avenue, New York, NY 10016      (212) 532-3710

This is where you get your lightweight table structures when you want to fly to shows. Tubular steel structural systems for displays, exhibits, store fixtures, and furniture. They make lightweight displays out of ½” tubing and supply the connectors.

O’Brien Manufacturing  

2081 Knowles Road, Medford, OR, 97501      (541) 773-2410

Oak and glass cases of many shapes and sizes for wall, table, and countertop. Excellent quality, and fast delivery. I have been using their 12” deep by 24” wide by 18” high oak cases for years.

Daniels Display Co., Inc.

1267 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103  (415) 861-4400

power track lighting and tempered glass case systems. These are the glass display systems with the chrome metal connectors that are repositioned with a wide blade screwdriver. You can make your own shelves from clear plastic. Useful for transporting when space is at a premium.

Flourish Co.

RT. 1, Brashears Jct., Combs, AR 72721 www.flourish.com     (800) 296-0049

Arch top canopy, Promaster indoor booth frames (with both tabs and screws at the corners for better stability), and flame-resistant drapes. They also have  metal mesh walls for hanging art.

Creative Energies, Inc.

1607 N. Magnolia Ave., Ocala, FL 34475    (800) 351-8889

Makers of the Light-Dome, the most stable canopy I have seen in windy shows. Useful indoors too.

DMG Products

(215) 393-8701 Fire Retardant -- fabric spray, wood spray, specialty cloths    

International E-Z UP, Inc.

1601 Iowa Avenue, Riverside, CA 92507       (800) 45-SHADE

They are the distributors for the E-Z UP canopies. Call them for the number of your local dealers. One California dealer is Made in the Shade, P. O. Box 231, Cool, CA 95614 (916) 888-7970. Another is Hawaiian Sun, Inc.,  Box 5447, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 458-5066

The strongest heavy duty E-Z UP is called the Eclipse, 70 lbs, best for outdoor shows.  The Express is the lighter version (51 lbs), with the removable top, best for flying or indoor shows.

Photography

Hap Sakwa

403 Taft St., Sebastopol, CA 95472  707-823-5787

Craftspeople all over the country send him products to be photographed. www.hapsakwa.com

Jerry Anthony

Excellent craft photography.   3952 Shattuck Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43220 614/451-5207 info@jerryanthonyphoto.com

Azad

Azad Photography

Specializes in jewelry   660 Laramie Blvd. Boulder CO 80304  888 258 0657 www.azadphoto.com George Post

George Post Photography. 5835 Bouquet Avenue. Richmond CA 94805  510-237-0197  gpp@gpostphoto.com  www.gpostphoto.com.

Bags and boxes

Uline

2105 South Lakeside Dr.Waukegan IL 60085 800-958-5463  Every size of box, bag, shipping label imaginable. Fast shipping.  www.veripack.com (free catalog)  

 

Rio Grande

7500 Bluewater Rd. N. W. Albuquerque, NM 87121.   (800) 545-6566. They have fancy packaging and display for small products.   

Insurance

Northwest Insurance Agency, Inc.

P. O. Box 1180, Santa Rosa, CA 95402 (707) 573-1300

They sell a Home-Based Business Owners policy from RLI Insurance Company (9025 North Lindbergh Drive, Peoria, IL 61615). Their policy for $1,000,000 liability, $5,000 medical expenses, and $50,000 fire liability costs about $295 a year. For an extra $100 you can get Personal Property coverage, which covers loss of stock or business equipment while on the road up to $5,000. They will add a name of any craft show that specifically requires it for $18 (prices are subject to change.)

Also check out homebased –business insurance from the Hartford Co. (thru AARP).

Credit Card Processing Systems

Novus Services, Inc.

1641 North First Street, Suite 260, San Jose, CA 95112 (800) 347-2000

This is the one to start with a Trans 330, ($300) when you key the numbers in after the show.   

Trade Show Merchants Network

(888) 626-2722 They can set you up with a radio card terminal such as the Nurit 8000 or a later model, for about $750. Another company can be found at www.merchantanywhere.com.

Money Tree Merchant Services

1 800-896-6901 http://www.cardpay.net/  Free Nurit 8000, low rates.

Computers and MicrosoftTM Office

Introduction

When you sell your handmade creations to the public, you have to deal with accounting, planning, inventory, invoices, and show scheduling. You might be thinking that computers could run your business, leaving you more time to create. Well, the bad news is that a computer can’t run your business and it can waste a lot of your time. But the good news is that you can use a computer for your email, play a few games or surf the Internet, and actually use it to help you from time to time to organize various aspects of your business, such as your mailing list, inventory, pricing, or bookkeeping.

 

Most artists and craftspeople don’t have enough time between doing shows and making products to wade through a lot of thick books about Microsoft Office or computers in general. You just want a few simple solutions. That is why this section includes:

1. Basic beginner lessons for using Windows and Excel.

2. 15 ready-made forms, databases, and spreadsheet templates.

3. Tips for using computers and software.

 

If you are totally new to computers, I recommend you try sitting at the computer with a friend who has some experience. You can learn more about Windows in one hour that way than in 20 hours reading a book about computers.

 

Hopefully you already have Microsoft Office installed on your computer. If you don’t, Office comes with a user’s guide to tell you how to install the software.

 

I have included a basic Excel lesson, which, if you need it and you follow the directions carefully, will get you started using spreadsheets. The design work of the spreadsheets has already been done for you. Once you learn how to use and change the spreadsheets and forms I have provided, you will be able to create your own templates as needed.

 Different Microsoft Office Configurations

 

The most popular word processing program worldwide is Microsoft Word. The spreadsheet most used for Windows computers is Microsoft Excel. All of the forms and spreadsheets in this book can be used and modified with Word and Excel. Microsoft Office consists of these two programs, plus other programs depending on which version you buy. It is estimated that 80% of the computers in the world have Microsoft Office installed.

 

If you already have Word and Excel on your computer, you basically have Office. To check, click on Start, then Programs, and look for Microsoft Word and/or Microsoft Excel. If the installed Word and Excel is version 6.0 or newer, you are set. To check your version of either program, start the program and click on About under the Help drop-down menu.

 

If you don’t have Word or Excel already, your best bet is Microsoft Office, Small Business Edition Upgrade* Version for about $240. It has Word and Excel (but not Access), and programs you probably don’t need, like Outlook, Small Business Financial Manager, Automap Streets, Internet Explorer. It also includes another program you might find very useful, Microsoft Publisher.

 

Separately, Publisher costs under $100 and is well worth the price. I use it quite often for signs, flyers, information sheets and hang tags.

 

Microsoft Office, Standard Edition, consists of Microsoft Word, Excel, and powerpoint (but not Access or Publisher). It usually retails for $400. The upgrade can be found for $190 at Office Depot. You need a previous version of Office or Works on your computer.

 

Microsoft Office, Professional Edition includes Access, a powerful complex database. This version retails for $500. Since you can record your mailing list in Excel and then print the labels with Word (I will show you how), you don’t need Access. If you decide you want it later, Access can be purchased separately for about $100.

 

If you have Excel but not Word, Microsoft has Works Suite, consisting of Word, Works, Encarta, Internet Explorer and other programs for under $100.

 

Basic Computer Requirements

IBM PC minimum requirements

The minimum hardware requirements to use Microsoft Office, Word and Excel:

A personal computer with a Pentium 500 MHz or faster processor (Pentium III recommended)

Windows ME Operating system or newer

256 MB of Ram memory

20 GB of hard-disk space

CD-ROM drive (4x or faster)

SVGA Video

An ink jet or laser printer to print out the forms and letters.

 

A used PC computer with a Pentium chip that runs at a speed of 500 mhz, with 256 MB (megabytes) of RAM, a color monitor, and a 40 GB hard drive can be found for under $300. It will run Windows ME and XP, older versions of Office, and all of the forms included here. It will also be rather slow.

 

If you are buying a new computer, get the most computer you can comfortably afford. Just keep in mind that a fast Pentium IV is not absolutely necessary to run Microsoft Office.

 

Your printer should be purchased new. Used printers offer too great a risk of faulty performance, for inconsequential savings. Office Depot has ink jet printers starting at $100 and laser printers for under $400. I use an HP Officejet 5610xi ink jet printer.

 

If you increase the memory in your computer to 512 Mb or more, your programs will run much faster.

What is word processing?

 

A word processor is little more than a typewriter with a memory. It helps you create documents that look good, quickly and without spelling errors. You can easily correct mistakes without retyping the entire page or using “white-out”. When you add new words or delete words, the surrounding words automatically move as needed. You can undo changes or accidental erasures. You can move, copy and paste text anywhere in the document. Then you save the letter on your hard drive, and print the letter on your printer.

What are spreadsheets?

 

Spreadsheets automatically recalculate answers as the numbers change. They are used to track finances, create budgets, and balance checkbooks.

 

Numbers (data) are entered into cells (boxes), on the spreadsheet. These cells are shown in rows across the page. Columns are rows of cells going down the page. Each cell has an address. The address is the column letter followed by the row number. For example, C2 is a cell in the third column across and the second row down.

 

A cell can contain words, numbers, or formulas. Words are used for labels in headings, to show you what the numbers refer to. Formulas are hidden in a cell, and only the results of the formula are shown. All cells with formulas automatically recalculate when numbers in corresponding cells are changed.

 

Functions are computer operations used with formulas to do common types of calculations. For example, if the formula in E1 is SUM (A1:D1), the cell will add the numbers in A1, B1, C1, and D1 and show the results in E1. SUM is the function. If you then change the number in C1, the results in E1 will automatically change when you press enter. Other functions include Average, If/Then, Date, etc.

 

Numbers and text in a spreadsheet cell can be reformatted as needed. Numbers can be shown as normal, as currency, as percentages, or as scientific notation. Text can be in different fonts and sizes. Text can be aligned in a cell: left, right, or centered as needed to make the spreadsheet easy to read. Shading and borders also help readability.

 

Mouse descriptions used in these instructions:

1. Click—lightly tap once on the left mouse button.

2. Double click—lightly tap twice quickly on the left mouse button.

3. Right click—tap lightly on the right mouse button.

4. Drag—move the mouse while holding down the left mouse button.

5. Select—click on the left mouse button, hold it down, and move the mouse over the text or range of cells to be selected. This is sometimes referred to as “highlighting.”

 

 

Spreadsheet Lesson

Start Excel by clicking on the Start button, point to Programs, and then click Microsoft Excel. Or click on Excel on the Office Shortcut bar if you have one.

If the spreadsheet does not fill the screen, click on the middle (Maximize) box in the upper right corner.

Place your cursor on the cell A1. A is on the top row, 1 is a number to the left. Type “5” (don’t type the quotation marks). Press enter.

Place the cursor on B and left click. Type “6”. Press enter.

Use the right arrow key to go to cell C1 (or move the cursor, then left click). Type “+A1+B1” (without the quotation marks), then press the enter key. The number 11 will now be in cell C1.

Place the cursor on A1 again, and type “3”. Press enter. The number 9 will appear in cell C1. The formula in C1 adds the numbers in A1 and B1.

Place the cursor on D1. Type “+sum(a1:c1)”, then press enter (make sure it is a colon, not a semicolon.) The number 18 will appear in D1. The sum function in this formula added the numbers in A1, B1, and C1.

Place the cursor on E1. Type “+(A1*D1)”, then press enter. The number 54 will appear in E1. The formula reads the * (asterisk) as a multiply command.

Place the cursor in B1. Type “4”. Press enter. Now the number in C1 changes to 7 (the formula in C1 adds A1 plus B1). The number in D1 changes to 14, and the number in E1 changes to 42 (A1 multiplied by B1).

Select or highlight cells A1 through D1 by placing the cursor on A1 and holding down the left mouse button as you drag the cursor over B1, C1, and D1. Then select Format>Cells. Click on Alignment; click on the down arrow next to the horizontal box for more choices. Click on Center. Now the numbers are centered in their cells

Select Format>Cells, then Number and Currency. Click on Okay. Now the numbers will have dollar signs in front of them. To get rid of the zeros to the right of the decimal place, change decimal places where you selected Currency to 0 by clicking on the arrows.

Put the cursor on A1. Select Insert>Rows. Now A1 is empty. Type “March”. Move the cursor to B1 and type “April”. Move the cursor to C1 and type Total. Press enter, then highlight A1, B1, C1 and click on the Bold Button.

To save this spreadsheet, click on File>Save As. Type a name in the file box, and click the Save button. To print this spreadsheet, chose File>Print

 

Installing “Marketing Spreadsheets”

 

Now put the original Complete Guide CD in a safe place. If you accidentally mess up a form in your Forms and Spreadsheets folder, just copy a new one from your original CD.

 

 

Using the “Marketing Spreadsheets” folder

1. Start Word or Excel by clicking on Start, Programs, then the program. If you have an Office Shortcut bar you can use that.

2. Open a form by clicking on File>Open…from the drop down menu.

3. Click on the yellow file folder with the left arrow, until you see Drive C in the window. Then double click on the Forms and Templates folder to open it. Then click on the filename of the form or template you wish to use.

4. The sample information in this book demonstrates what the form is designed to do and shows you, by example, where to insert your own information. All of the formulas are already in place on the form. To see what they look like, click on the cell, and the formula will appear in the contents window. Don’t change them.

5. Personalize the form with your name, address, and phone number. Insert your logo if you have one. If it is a word processing form, you can copy your letterhead to it or copy it to your letterhead.

6. Save the document file under a new file name using the File>Save As command. Save the document file in a different folder (the My Documents folder will work nicely.) This will ensure that any modifications you make will not alter the original form or any other forms you might have open. For the new file name, use a name you can easily remember, such as the name of the customer.

7. Fill in the form using the instructions in this book and save again (using the File>Save command this time, not Save As). Enter data in green or black rectangles. Results (calculations) will appear in red rectangles. Don’t enter data in red rectangles!  That is where the formulas are. If you accidentally type over a formula in a red rectangle, you can start over by reloading the template from the original directory or disk.

8. Print the form using either the print tool Icon or the File>Print command.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craft Pricing (pricing.xls)

 

Use this form to automatically calculate the price of your craft product. It is very simple and useful. Discount and Markup calculators are also included.

 

Step-by-step Instructions:

1. Enter your numbers in column F only. Results appear in column G.

2. Calculate how many pieces you can make in a day. Put that number in the first box. If you take two days to make a piece, put .5 in this box. If you can make 50 pieces from start to finish, put 50 in this box. The spreadsheet will divide this number by 8 to determine how many you make in an hour.

3. Next you enter the salary you want to make a year. Be realistic here. Somewhere between a teacher and a doctor, depending on what you really expect to be able to make. If you have been doing this for a while, enter the amount you made last year. The spreadsheet will divide this number by 1920, which is the number of hours in a working year with 40 hour weeks and 4 weeks off for vacation as a basis.

4. Now you enter the total cost of the materials in each piece. For a woodworker, for example, this would be the wood plus any mechanical parts. Press enter.

The spreadsheet will now calculate your hourly rate, divide it by the pieces per hour, and add materials cost. It will add 15% for overhead, 10% for profit, and show the results in the box next to Distributor price (G7). This is your absolute minimum price for the craft product, out the door of your shop.

 

The wholesale price is the absolute minimum price plus 15% for a sales rep or other costs of getting your work into a retail store, such as brochures or wholesale trade shows.

 

The retail price is the wholesale price times 2, which would be the price you sell it at a craft show or the price a store would normally sell it for.

 

When entering a percent number in the Discounts and Markups section, always use a decimal first. For example, enter .40, not 40 for percent discount in F15.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craft Fair Application Organizer (organizer.xls)

 

The  purpose of this form is to avoid missing deadlines. When the information you input is sorted by the computer, you will have a list of upcoming deadline dates in the correct order.

 

Step-by-step Instructions:

1. When you receive a brochure or application for a fair in the mail, immediately enter the fair name and deadline information on a printout of this form as shown. You don’t have to boot up the computer each time, though. Write the fair information on this form by hand, and every two weeks or so, enter and sort the information on your computer, and print a new updated form. Keep this form in plain sight (not in a drawer!) on the refrigerator or bulletin board where you will see it often to check for approaching deadlines.

2. Enter deadline dates in column C. You don’t have to type in the whole date. You can type au 10 and the computer will insert August 10 for you because the column is already formatted to show dates. Type the actual show dates in Column D, July 3-7, for example.

3. Check whether you need photos or slides. The time to check whether the show requires a photo of your booth, or a workshop slide, is when you first get the application. When the deadline is tomorrow, you may not have enough time.

4. After you have put in all of the fairs you are considering, sort the list by the deadline date. To do this, highlight the entire list that you want to sort by dragging the cursor from the upper left of the first entry to the lower right of the last entry. The click on Data>sort, then select deadline (or column C) in the sort by box, and click on the ascending button. Print out the form and post it where you will see it.

5. After entering the information on this form from the application, file the application in the folder for the month the fair takes place. When you apply to the fair, cross it off of this list.

6. When you find out that you are accepted, enter the fair in bold letters on the “Craft Fairs at a Glance” form on the next page.

7. The total of the upcoming show fees is shown at G38.

8. Change headings and columns as needed. Change the heading for Promoter to Motel Reservations, Income, or anything else you would like to note about the fair.

 

 

Craft Fairs at a Glance (fair year.xls)

 

This form shows the fairs for an entire year at a glance, and alerts you to weeks when you don’t have a fair. This form is very useful in showing the big picture and helping you plan ahead.

 

Step-by-step Instructions:

1. Print out this form and tape it up in a conspicuous place.

2. Write in names and dates of all fairs you are considering doing. Write in the dates and name of a fair when you get the application, if you haven’t already. You don’t need to write the entire name of the fair, just enough so you know which fair it is.

3. When you have some extra time, open this form in the computer and enter the names you had hand written on the previous printed form. Print this out to have a neat yearly calendar of all of your fairs. Indicate any fairs you are accepted in with Bold Type. To do this on the computer, highlight the name of the fair you typed in, then click on the B button in the button bar at the top of the page.

4. You can designate fairs applied to but not accepted yet with a question mark (?), fairs you are on the waiting list for with a “w”, and fairs that you are considering but haven’t yet applied for with parenthesis ( ).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Utah Arts Festival, Salt Lake City, Utah 

 

 

 

 

Craft Fair Equipment List (equipment.xls)

 

Use this list to keep track of what to bring to a craft fair. It will certainly dampen your spirits to drive 500 miles to do a fair and discover that you have left something important behind. Glance over this list just before leaving for every fair.

 

Step-by-step Instructions:

1. Change or delete any of the items in column A just by typing over them. Add other items as needed, such as different displays, kinds of stock, etc.

2. Print out a copy of this form, with the “Packed” and “Need” columns either filled out or blank, to be filled in by hand.

If you are interested in the value of what you have or need to get, or for planning or insurance purposes, insert the value in the Cost columns. The combined totals will appear in I32.

 

þ Spreadsheet Tip

Do you have unexplained information In Excel cells?

 

If A Spreadsheet Cell Shows #####

If a cell shows pound signs, it means that the cell is not wide enough to show the whole number. You can select the cell, click Format>Cells, Number to change the way the number is formatted. Or you can use Format>Column, Autofit Selection to adjust the column’s width. Or you could just use the mouse, click on the line at the right top of the column, and drag to make the column wider.

 

 

 

 

 

Art in the Park, Boulder City, Nevada  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Show Expense Report (expenses.xls)

 

This form will show you how much you really make at a craft fair. It will also help you record business trip expenses for later deduction on your Schedule C at tax time. There are limits on the percentages allowable for costs of meals and transportation.

 

Generally you must be away from your hometown to deduct travel expenses on business trips. Craft fairs and trade shows are considered temporary business locations and your necessary expenses in getting to and from the fairs are considered business expenses and not commuting expenses (which are not deductible). You must keep records and receipts to support your deduction of these expenses.

 

The following expenses of a business trip away from home are deductible:

Plane, railroad, taxi and other transportation fares

Hotel and lodging expenses

Meal costs (50%)

Tips, telephone, and fax costs

Laundry and cleaning expenses

Excess baggage charges (including insurance)

 

For `purposes, your tax home is your place of business, regardless of where you maintain your family residence. This tax home includes the entire city or general area of your business premises. Your residence may be your tax home if your income is dependent on craft fairs at widely scattered locations, you have no other fixed place of work, and your residence is in a location economically suited for your work.

 

Step-by-step Instructions:

1. Enter your headings as shown and enter your physical location for each day in row 7 (traveling to or from, or at show).

2. Enter all expenses for the show as shown. Enter Jury fee or deposit in B29. E29 and F29 indicate commission paid (if any).

3. Net income shown at I33 is equal to show income minus expenses and show fees.

4. In this example the show fee is shown on Wednesday and the 20% commission given to the promoter at the end of the show is shown on Friday.

5. This form is set up for a weekend craft fair. For a trade show during the week, change the days of the week at the top to begin with Sunday instead of Wednesday.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Customer  Mailing List (customer.xls)

 

This is a list of your current and past customers. All you do is enter the address from every check that you get at a craft fair or show. In addition you can use a guest book. You have the customers enter their name and address whenever they buy something using a credit card or cash instead of a check.

 

Your list should consist of actual satisfied customers who know your work. Notify them of new products and upcoming craft fairs where they can buy from you. When you send them a brochure, ask them to pass it along to someone they know who might like to buy your products.

 

Step-by-step Instructions:

1. In Excel, open customer.xls. Select Data>Form to see the database format. Enter information as shown. If you don’t need information in a specific blank, just skip it.

2. Use the Tab key to move from field to field.

3. Use Enter or arrow keys to move to the next record.

4. The example shown on the next page is for the database view in Excel.

5. To print labels, use the envelopes and labels function in Word. (See below for information how to do this).

 

þ To print mailing labels in Microsoft Word:  

1. Open Word, select Tools, Mail Merge.  

2. Under 1. Main Document, click on Create, Mailing Labels, Active window.  

3. Under 2, Data Source, Get Data, Open Data Source.  

4. In the Open Data Source window, select Files of type (at the bottom)—MS Excel Worksheets (*.xls). Then browse file up or down to find your top1100galleries.xls and open it.  Ignore the first window that says something about asap utilities (click OK), then in the little Microsoft Excel window, select Database.  

5. A window opens that says Set up main document.

6. Select Avery standard, then select 5160 address labels.  Click okay.  

7. In the Create Labels window that opens, click on Insert Merge Field, and put the name on the first line.  

8. Press enter to go to the next line and click on insert merge field again and put the address on the second line.  Put the city, state and zip on the third line.  

9. Click okay, then click on #. Merge.  In the Merge window that opens, click on All, then Merge again. Your labels will appear.  Put in mail label (1x2 5/8 paper 5160 and print your labels.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Columbus Arts Festival, Columbus, Ohio

 

 

Trade Show Expenses (trade show.xls)

 

If you want to expand your business, you might consider having a booth at a wholesale trade show for handcrafted products. Trade shows can be expensive, and may not produce immediate profits. However, they are a great way to meet distributors, your competition, retail storeowners and buyers, and even sales reps.

 

Beside the cost of the booth, there are many other expenses associated with doing a trade show. This form will help you calculate the expenses of a trade show in advance. You may find areas in which you can cut some costs. You might save money if you build your own display and shipping cartons for it. Otherwise, budget for a portable modular show exhibit, available and advertised in trade magazines.

 

Step-by-step Instructions:

1. Enter the names of the cities that you plan to do shows in row 6.

2. The sample shown has information from brochures from the trade shows.

3. Row 21 contains data from dividing your display cost by 4.

4. Row 30 shows the total expenses for each show.

 

þ Word Processing Tip

Use Microsoft Word to Print a Sheet of Return Address Labels

 

 

Using the Label function in Word, you can print an entire sheet of the same label to create return address labels. Select Tools>Envelopes and Labels, then Labels, then Options. Select Avery standard and select 5160-Address for the Product number. Click OK,  Type in your return address in the Address: Box. Click on New Document, and print as many pages as you need.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sales Rep. Agreement (repagreement.doc)

 

Using a sales representative is another way to get your craft creations into stores.  A good rep will not only take your samples to stores and take orders, but he or she will often have a booth at several major trade shows as well. They can also get your work into areas of the country that you can’t reach.

 

The sales representative agreement example shown here has a 15% commission. That is 15% of the wholesale price, not the retail price. 15% is the craft industry average. High-priced items may call for a 5% or 10% commission, while very low-priced items may require a 20% - 30% commission. You can easily change the commission with your computer.

 

Step-by-step Instructions:

1. Read this agreement closely before using it. Change any time periods and percentages that you wish.

2. Fill in the territory that you want the rep to cover exclusively.

You may want the rep to pay for the samples or put a deposit before taking them.

 

 

þ Windows Tip

Putting Shortcuts On Your Desktop

If  you use a file very often, you can place it on your desktop. Open Explorer, and select the file. Hold down CTRL and Shift, and drag the file to the desktop. You now have a shortcut that when clicked on, will first load the file and the program that uses it. An even easier way is to right click on the file while in Explorer, select Send To, and chose Desktop as Shortcut. Now look for the icon on your desktop. Right click on it and select Rename to give the shortcut icon a shorter name.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sales Representative Agreement

 

This agreement is made on __________ (date) between _____________________________________ (name of sales representative), herein referred to as "sales rep", of _____________________________________ (address of sales representative) and _____________________________________  (name of artist or craftsperson), herein referred to as "we" or "artist", of ____________________________________  (address of artist or craftsperson).

This agreement shall be in force for the period of one year and shall continue thereafter for one-year periods unless either party gives notice to the other in writing three months in advance of the renewal date or on that date for a date three months hence.

The above sales rep shall be our exclusive representative to the gift shops and craft stores and galleries, in the following territory or states: ________________________________________________________________________

We expect the sales rep to give this territory complete and thorough coverage for which a commission of 15% will be paid on all invoices of sales made by the sales rep.

Commission payments will be sent to the sales rep on the 15th of each month, accompanied by copies of invoices for all the billing to trade accounts in the above territory.  All expenses of travel and maintenance will be paid by the sales representative.  The sales rep will call on major accounts at least once a month.

We grant the sales rep the right of access at all times to our copies of all invoices to enable him (or her) to ascertain the correctness of our commission payments to him.

We agree that the sales rep's services to this company are not exclusive (meaning that the sales representative will continue to represent other companies).

We will provide product samples as needed for "selling tools".  These samples will be replaced by us when damaged.  These samples will remain our property and will be returned at the end of this agreement.  These samples have a value of _____________ (dollars), and the sales rep shall post a deposit with us for that amount, which will be refunded upon return of the samples in good condition.

The sales rep will only be paid commissions for sales made directly by him to accounts in this territory during the time of this agreement.  

 

Date: ______________________________

 

Sales representative's signature: ____________________________________

 

Artist's or craftperson's signature:­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­____________________________

 

Craft Gallery Database (gallery list.xls)

 

You can use this database to keep track of gift shops and galleries you currently do business with (or plan to). You can also use it with the galleries list on the CD-Rom that comes with this place. You can note when you contacted them, or mailed them a brochure, and whether or not they have ordered.

 

Step-by-step Instructions:

1. Select Data>Form to get to form view.

2. Use the tab key to go from field to field.

3. The keep and drop fields are used for sorting active from inactive galleries.

4. Save your mailing list as an Excel worksheet.

 

 

þ Spreadsheet Tip

Sorting Your Mail List in an Excel Database

To sort data, click Data>Sort. A dialog box will pop up, letting you specify how you want the data sorted. You can sort up to three levels. Select the first field you want to sort by and select Ascending order. Make sure the Header Row button is selected. To perform a more complex sort, select the criteria to sort by for the second and third levels. For example, if first and last names are different fields in your database, you may want to first sort by last name and then by first name in case some records have the same last name.

 

Filtering your database

If you want all of the names from a specific ZIP code or city, use AutoFilter to filter out unwanted records, leaving a list of those you want. The rest of the records are hidden from view. You can save the filtered database under a new name, without altering the first database. Choose Data>AutoFilter and an arrow appears at the top of each column in your database. Click on the arrow and a drop-down list displays all of the values that appear in that field. Chose Custom to specify values equal to what you want.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

California Gift Show (setting up), Los Angeles, California 

Credit Application (credit application.doc)

 

This form can be used both to apply for credit for your craft supplies, and to extend credit to your wholesale customers.

 

Step-by-step Instructions:

 

To apply for credit:

1. In the event you need credit for your operations, use this form to provide references to your supplier.

2. If you are not D & B (Dun and Bradstreet) rated, leave that blank or delete it from your form.

3. Have this form filled out and take copies when going to a trade show. Most suppliers will ask for it.

To extend credit:

1. Print out this form and mail it to each new wholesale account. Anyone who wants to buy your products on credit should fill out this credit application. Put your company name and address either at the top or bottom of the form.

2. Check their references. You don’t need to extend credit to bad credit risks. If they don’t check out they must pay in advance or COD. You can also ask for a deposit or partial payment in advance.

Credit line requested is the maximum amount of credit you are willing to extend to the gallery.

Usual terms are 2% 10, net 30. That means that the amount is due and payable in 30 days, with a 2% discount (reward) if payment is received in 10 days. This beats using a credit card, which costs the supplier from 2% to 5%, and costs the buyer interest if he or she doesn’t pay it in full within a month.

 

 

 

þ More Spreadsheet Tips

Resizing Excel Columns or Rows

You can quickly and easily resize columns and rows in Excel. All you have to is point your mouse over the right side of a column letter or the bottom of a row number, click, and drag the edge of the row over until you are happy with its size.

 

Finding Information about Items in Excel

You can quickly find out information about any button, icon, cell and so on, by simply pressing Shift + F1, and clicking on the item in question.

 

 

Credit Application and References

 

Company Name____________________________________Date______________

Address_______________________City____________State_________Zip_____

Owner/Manager_______________________________Tel.No.________________

How long in business?________________________D & B Rated__________

Business Type  __Sole Proprietorship  ___Partnership  ___Corporation in State of ______

Person to contact regarding purchase orders and invoice payments:

Name:___________________________Title________Phone______________________

Trade References:

Company______________________________Address_______________________

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Contact   ______________________________Phone________________________

Company______________________________Address_______________________

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Contact________________________________Phone________________________

Company______________________________Address_______________________

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Contact________________________________Phone________________________

Bank References:

Name________________________________Address_______________________

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­_____________________________________Account. #_____________________

Name________________________________Address_______________________

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­_____________________________________Account. #_____________________

Credit line requested:

$_________________________________

The undersigned authorizes inquiry as to credit information and certifies the above information to be true. We further acknowledge that credit privileges, if granted, may be withdrawn at any time.

 

Signed:_______________________________________

position:_______________________________Date:____

Consignment Agreement (consignment.doc)

 

This is an agreement made between a gallery and a craftsperson, when the craftsperson elects to place his or her craft products in a store without advance payment, in order to receive a larger amount (55% to 70%) payable when the craft is sold.

 

I won’t go into the pros and cons of consignment here. Most craftspeople don’t do it, but for some it is the only way to sell their crafts. However you feel about it, if you place your product in a store without payment, a written agreement is necessary to protect your rights and the stores’ rights.

 

Step-by-step Instructions:

1. In this form, the consignee is the gallery, and you are the seller. Change the percentage of the proceeds that is to be deducted by the gallery if necessary. Forty percent is the usual amount.

2. Describe the crafts you are placing in the store. If there is not enough room you can create a separate list. (If you only have one item, use the next consignment agreement in this book.)

3. Fill in the number of days you want to keep your merchandise in the store.

4. Read this form carefully. Check the insurance provisions, when the proceeds are paid, advertising materials, and termination notification.

5. The agreement is not valid unless signed by both parties.

 

 

 

þ Office Tip

Keyboard Shortcuts

You don’t need a chart with all the keyboard shortcuts, nor do you have to remember them. Notice that File, Edit, and the other menus at the top of the page have a letter underlined. If you hold down the Alt key and press the letter, the menu drops down. Then simply type the underlined letter in the menu to select it. For example, to see a print preview, press the Alt key and F (for File menu, and the f does not have to be capitalized), then V (the “V” is underlined in Print Preview). To return to normal, press the Alt key and V (for View menu), then N (for Normal). Control key and P for print, control and X for copy, and control and Y for paste are other useful commands using the keyboard.

 

Consignment Agreement

 

This agreement is made on ______ (date) between ____________________(store, herein referred to as "Consignee") and ______________________________( artist, herein referred to as "Seller") as follows:

Seller hereby consigns to Consignee the following described merchandise, to be displayed at a prominent place at Consignee's premises and offered for sale at the price set forth, of which the designated percentage of 40% shall be deducted out of proceeds by Consignee for its compensation.

Quantity                                        Merchandise Description                           Price

________           __________________________________________     _________

________           __________________________________________     _________

________           __________________________________________     _________

________           __________________________________________     _________

________           __________________________________________     _________

________           __________________________________________     _________

________           __________________________________________     _________

________           __________________________________________     _________

________           __________________________________________     _________

________           __________________________________________     _________

________           __________________________________________     _________

________           __________________________________________     _________

Said merchandise shall be displayed until the earlier of sale or when ____days have elapsed.

Sales tax shall be collected and paid by consignee and shall not be considered part of the price nor subject to percentage allocation.

Merchandise is to be delivered by Seller in good and salable condition and free of defects.  Consignee shall maintain the merchandise with care, shall keep it insured for theft and damage, and shall make all reasonable efforts to comply with seller's instructions for the care of the merchandise.  In the event Consignee fails to do so, Consignee shall be liable for the price for said merchandise set forth above, less the percentage thereof allocated to Consignee.

Consignee shall sell only at the price listed herein, unless authorized by Seller to sell at a different price.  At the end of each month, Consignee shall account for and pay to Seller all proceeds of sales of the merchandise consigned by Seller.

Should the merchandise remain unsold at the end of the consignment period and an election made by the Consignee or Seller to remove said merchandise, any costs incurred by the delivery of same to Seller shall be borne by Seller and deducted from any proceeds then due the Seller.

Any advertising or other promotional materials provided by the Seller shall be returned in good condition after all merchandise is sold, or this agreement is terminated, or upon request of Seller.

This agreement may be terminated by either party upon sixty (60) days written notice.

This agreement is made under and shall be construed under the laws of the State of _________.

 

Consignee's signature_____________________________________

 

Seller’s Signature_________________________________________

 

Monthly Accounting System (bookkeeping.xls)

 

There are two primary reasons to keep records of a business operation: they are required by law, and they are useful to you as the manager of your craft business.

 

This 12-month spreadsheet will satisfy all requirements by the IRS for record keeping (you must save your receipts and wholesale invoices, of course). All you have to do is enter your income and your expenses as they occur. The spreadsheet does the rest.

 

Step-by-step Instructions:

1. Load Excel, then open the template accounts.xls from your Forms and Spreadsheets folder.

2. Enter the year in J2. Green boxes are for entering data.

3. Enter your company name in D3. Words typed in green are meant to be typed over. They will show up on your printout.

4. Enter the amount of tax (or tax included) in A3. If you have only one retail location this will be the sales tax you charge. If you have several retail locations or fairs in different states that have different tax rates, use an average here. This will show you approximately how much you need to set aside for sales tax. If you don’t enter anything in these two boxes, it won’t affect the rest of the template.

5. Enter the percentage in A4 of the amount of Social Security tax (FICA) you will be required to pay at the end of the year. This was 15.3 in 2004. This will give you a report each month for the total you will need to set aside for the year.

6. Enter income from direct sales in Column D and wholesale income in Column D.

7. Enter merchandise (products you resell) in Column I and supplies (fair fees, Office supplies, etc., which you use) in Column J.

8. Rows 41-47 have formulas in them that show the results for the month. They have red borders to show you not to enter data in them.

9. Rows 591-597 will show you totals for the whole year.

 

 

This is a 12 page 12-month template. If you only want to print one page and not the entire 12 months, select File, Print, then click on Page(s) from 1 to 1 (or 4 to 4, etc.) To print a specific area of a page, highlight the area by dragging the cursor from the upper left to the lower right of the area (or range), then select File, Print.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Invoice (invoice.xls)

This form is sent to the customer as a request for payment. It can be mailed before the product is shipped, or with the product. It is only sent once. (Additional requests for payments are called statements. A statement consists of a list of all unpaid invoices.)

 

You keep a copy of this for yourself and mark it “paid” when you receive payment.

 

Step-by-step Instructions:

1. Fill in your company name and address as shown. You can save a copy with just your name and address as a template and use it when starting a new invoice.

2. Enter Sold To, Ship To, and Price information. If there is nothing in Column A, Column G won’t calculate.

3. If this is a taxable retail sale, enter 1 in G10, if wholesale enter 0 (zero, not the letter O).

4. If the order is prepaid, enter a 1 in G11. This will calculate a 2% discount in G33. If you want to change the discount rate, change the formula in G33 from 0.02 to 0.01 for example. A 2% discount may encourage prepayment.

5. The tax charge (for a retail order if 1 is entered in G12) in G34 is based on the rate in your state that you enter in C32. To enter 7%, enter .07, not 7.

6. Enter shipping charges that you pay in G35.

7. Enter any prepaid amount in G37. G38 shows the amount due.

8. Totals are calculated automatically.

 

You can add the following additional statements under the Invoice heading, depending on what you would like the customer to do:

“Please pay from this invoice; no statement will be issued.”

“Payment due on receipt of this invoice. Items will be shipped on payment.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Business Plan (business plan.doc)

 

This one-page business plan is a “personal success” business plan, as opposed to a “formal” business plan used to obtain financing from banks.

Making a business plan will force you to think about what choices you must make to have a more successful business.

 

Review and modify this plan every 6 months. Notice how well (or how poorly) you have estimated your costs, goals, etc.

 

Guidelines:

1. Structure—Sole proprietorship, partnership, corporation                                  

2. Background—List the skills required to make and market your products.   

3. Qualifications—Why are you especially qualified to make these products?              

4. Products—List all of the products you make.                                                              

5. Short Description of Product—Describe product in one sentence. If you cannot describe your product concisely, the user will not recognize their need for it.                                                

6. Long Description—Describe products and their purpose.                                      

7. Features—List up to 5 features that benefit or interest customers.                               

8. Cost—How much do your materials cost and can costs be reduced?                           

9. Pricing Strategy—Are your prices high, medium, or low relative to the market?             

10. Uniqueness—List at least one unique feature of your product.                                                                                                 Competition—How do their costs, pricing, and quality compare to yours?        

11. Customers—List their average age, education, and profession.                          

12. Interests—What motivates your customers to buy? Status, quality, price?                   

13. Customer Benefits—How does your product improve the customers’ quality of life?          

14. Marketing Plan—Advertising, trade shows, promotional activities, yearly sales objectives, price, packaging, support, etc.                                                                                    

15. New Products—What products are you planning in addition to the ones you have now?

16. One-Year Goal—Where will your business be in one year in terms of monthly income, net assets (money in the bank), name recognition, number of customers, etc.?

17. Five-Year Goal—Same as above, except for five years.                                                   

18. Ten-Year Goal—What would you like to be doing in ten years, in terms of your craft?

 

One Page Business Plan

 

Company Name: _______________________________________________________________________

Structure: ________________________________________________________________

Owner's Name:  _______________________________________________________________________

Background: ________________________________________________________________________

Qualifications:____________________________________________________________

Products: _______________________________________________________________

Short Description of Products:________________________________________________________________

Long Description:  ________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

 

Features:

1._________________________________________________________________________

2._________________________________________________________________________

3._________________________________________________________________________

4._________________________________________________________________________

5._________________________________________________________________________

Cost:______________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

Pricing Strategy:_____________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

Uniqueness: _________________________________________________________________________

Competition:_______________________________________________________________

Customers: _________________________________________________________________

Interests: ___________________________________________________________________

Customer Benefits:________________________________________________________

Marketing Plan: ____________________________________________________________

New Products: ________________________________________________________________

One year goal:_________________________________________________________________

Five year goal:________________________________________________________________

Ten year goal:_________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inventory (inventory.xls)

 

Many small craft business owners overlook the importance of inventory management. Running out of stock (products) causes you to lose customers and sales. Too much stock reduces your cash, limiting your growth and creating a risk that your stock will become obsolete before you can sell it. A close watch on your inventory is very important. If you use this form on a regular basis you will know exactly what you have in stock and what you need to make.

 

This form calculates both the parts value and finished value, and tells you when to order parts (as your inventory drops below a certain level). The parts inventory column will work well when there is only one or a single group of parts in your product. Fill in the number of parts on hand and the cost per unit.

 

If there are too many component parts in your craft, just use this form for finished products. Fill in the required inventory level that you feel comfortable with (five shows worth, for example). You might want more for an approaching Christmas season.

 

Step-by-step Instructions:

1. Fill in as shown in sample. Columns E, I, and J have formulas in them.

2. Required Inventory Level is the minimum number of items you want to have on hand at any time. The last column shows how many more products you have to make or parts to order.

3. The number in C33 is the number of parts on hand that need to be made. The other numbers in row 33 indicate the inventory value of unfinished parts and finished products.

4. This example shows parts and finished value of wood barrettes. These barrettes each have a metal clip. To help the craftsperson decide what to order, this spreadsheet adds the number of clips on hand to the number of finished barrettes. It then compares it to the minimum number of total barrettes (required inventory level, column H) you would like to have on hand, and shows the number of parts to order in column J. Even though it says 17 in the To Order column, you would go ahead and order a batch of 50. If you waited until it indicated 50 in the To Order column, you would have none left and probably not enough time to order and make them before you needed them. So, if any amount is shown in the To Order column J, order the usual quantity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marketing Plan (marketing plan.xls)

 

A marketing plan will be nearly as useful to you as your business plan. This plan will indicate if you are using your marketing tools in the best way, and will focus your attention on those marketing activities that are most likely to work, as well as those that are most affordable. It will also give you a total anticipated marketing budget.

 

Step-by-step Instructions:

1. Decide which customers you are targeting with each marketing tool.

2. Enter dates when you plan to use the tool. Enter the time allowed or actually spent on each specific marketing technique.

3. Enter the projected total cost in column F until or unless the actual cost is known.

 

Learn as Much as possible about the Market Which You’ll be Targeting

Who are your potential customers?

How many are there?

Where are they located?

Where do they now buy the crafts you want to sell them?

Can you offer them anything they are not getting now?

How can you persuade them to do business with you?

 

The Marketing Process Involves Three Steps:

Budgeting, calculated by what you can afford.

Determining the best way to reach customers and prospects without wasting your money.

Gathering facts on the advertising media and their market to justify the dollars to be spent.

 

 

þ Printing Tip

Making Your Laser Cartridge Last Longer

If your laser printer ink cartridge seems like it’s starting to fade, try removing the cartridge from your printer and giving it a good shake back and forth over newspaper or the wastebasket. This will increase the life of your laser cartridge significantly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Press Release (press release.doc)

 

Send a press release to all of the local media at a craft fair that you are going to be doing to generate public awareness of you, your unique product, and the fair as well. A press release is also useful in promoting your craft at a local store, and the store will appreciate the free advertising. You can also send it to magazines those gallery owners read.

 

Not every press release will be accepted by the media, but whatever is accepted will be a form of free advertising for you. An interesting angle could be the environmental aspects or safety issues involved with the creation or use of your product. A new product, a contest promotion, something charitable or anything unusual about your business is a newsworthy event and worth letting the media know about.

A press release has more credibility than an ad, because it will appear only if it meets the standards of the editor.

You can reach more periodicals with it than you could afford to reach through paid advertising.

A news story or magazine article takes more time to read than an ad. The more time a reader spends with your story, the more likely he or she is to remember you.

 

Step-by-step Instructions:

1. Fill in the name, address and contact information. Use a headline that will grab the reader’s attention.

2. Fill in the date and place of the event. Editors want to be able to use your press release without changes. In the body of the press release, tell whom, what, when, where, and why. Put the important information at the beginning. Don’t forget to include a brief background of the artist.

3. Use 10 point type to get this press release all on one page if possible. Notice the text is always double-spaced. Use the number -30- to show the end of the press release, followed by directions to the editor, if needed.

4. After you have written your announcement, call up the newspaper, ask for the name of the city editor, and be sure you have the correct spelling of his or her name and the exact address. This is common courtesy and is extremely important to some media people.

5. Take a picture of yourself holding your craft or working in your shop. Have the picture blown up to an 8 x 10 or 5 x 7 glossy black-and-white print. Send this along with your press release. Don’t expect photos back unless you include a SASE.

 

Press Release

For Immediate Release

 

 

Hardy's Hardwoods

7865 Thomson St.

Clayton, CA 95447

707-987-5843

Contact: Alan Hardy

 

Local Woodworker Introduces New Wood Product For a Safer Environment.

 

Feb. 27, 2007, Clayton, CA--Alan Hardy, a professional woodworker living in Clayton, California, announces his use of a new wood product for his handcrafted wood boxes.  The product is called Dymondwood, a professionally recognized substitute for endangered tropical hardwoods.

 

Mr. Hardy began using this product after realizing that his customers were concerned about the depletion of tropical rain forests and were boycotting hardwoods such as teak, padauk and rosewood.  While some tropical forests are "managed tree plantations" and plant more trees than they harvest, he was concerned that there was no way of knowing whether or not the woods he was using were actually from one of those plantations.  The Dymondwood he now uses is made from birch, which is an abundant renewable resource available throughout North America, Europe and Northern Asia.

 

Dymondwood consists of many layers of birch veneer, colored with vegetable dyes and glued together with resin under very high pressure. The result is a totally homogenous wood product with a wide range of characteristics superior to conventional wood.  It is stable and not affected by extremes in temperature or moisture.  When turned decoratively on a lathe, sanded and buffed to a satin or gloss finish, Dymondwood produces a beautiful and long lasting wood product.

 

Mr. Hardy's boxes made from Dymondwood are available in many unique shapes and colors.  A selection of his boxes will be on display and available for purchase at the Peach Blossom Festival in Beck’s Park in Atlanta on April 26 and 27.

 

 

-30-

Letterheads (letterheads.doc)

 

These are samples of letterheads you can create with only your word processor. Graphics are possible with Microsoft Word, but as you can see, they are not necessary to create a professional letterhead. To use one of these, select one you like, then type over with your own name, address and phone number. You can change the fonts to any fancy font you like. Use Insert Picture to add a logo.

 

Step-by-step Instructions:

1. Delete the letterheads you don’t need and move yours to the top of the page

2. Save it with a file new name. Instant letterhead! No trip to the offset printer necessary.

3. You can print this out, make copies, and then use them in your printer for future letters.

4. Or you can load this letterhead into your word processor, and start typing directly on it.

 

 

þ Clip Art Tip

Using Clip Art

There is a lot of clip art on the Microsoft Office CD. First insert this CD in your computer. Then position the cursor where you want the clip art to be. Then chose Insert>Picture, Clip Art, and open the Clip Gallery. Pick a category, look at the clips, and click on Insert when you have selected a clip you want to use.

 

 

 

 

Fourth Avenue Street Fair, Tucson, Arizona Letterheads

 

 

Richard Adam                                                                              WOODTURNER

 

42 HUTCHINSON STREET        SANTA ROSA, CA 97654      PH. 707-545-4400

 

 

 

 

RICHARD'S WOODTURNINGS

42  Hutchinson Street, Santa Rosa, Ca. 97654

Telephone 707-545-4400

 

 

 

 

 

Richard's Woodturnings                                            RICHARD ADAMS, OWNER

___________________________________________________________________

42 HUTCHINSON ST.              SANTA ROSA, CA 97654               707-545-4400

 

 

 

 

RICHARD'S WOODTURNINGS

42 HUTCHINSON STREET  SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA 97654   TELEPHONE (707) 545-4400

 

 

 

 

 

RICHARD ADAMS, WOODTURNER                                       

                                                                                                                         42 HUTCHINSON ST.

                                                                                                                  SANTA ROSA, CA 97654

                                                                                                  (707) 545-4400 FAX (707) 542-2738Shipping Labels (labels.doc)

 

You can use Word to print your own shipping labels. You will need Avery Laser Labels #5164 (or compatible), which are 3 1/3” by 4”.

 

Step-by-step Instructions:

1. Open labels.doc. The lines on the edge of the label shown in the example on the next page are there only to show you how the labels are laid out. They will not show up on your final printout.

2. Change printed information as needed for the first label by deleting, backspacing, and typing in your return address.

3. Insert graphic at beginning of address if desired.

4. Highlight and copy the first label and paste on the rest of the labels.

5. Save under your own file name and print as needed on 5164 laser label paper.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resume (resume.doc)

 

If you are not having luck getting into a specific show, try including a resume with your application next time (unless specifically requested not to).  Very few shows ask for a resume.

 

Here’s one to use as an example. Now you won’t have to go out and get a book about resumes just to remember what they look like or pay someone $50 or more to create one for you.

 

Using the format shown, delete and type over with your own information.

 

Keep the Following In Mind As You Fill In the Information:

Employment directors and art shows expect only a one page, concise resume. If they need more information, they will request it.

 

Your abilities, experiences, education, and goals must be presented clearly and sequentially. A resume can be a very important document. It shows you at your best.

 

 

 

 

Contemporary Crafts Market, Ft. Mason, San Francisco, CA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resume

 

Richard Adams

42 Hutchinson Street

Santa Rosa, CA 97654

(707)-545-4400

 

EXPERIENCE RELATED TO ARTS AND CRAFTS

 

Freelance Woodworker

1991-Present  Self-employed wood products manufacturing, turning wood boxes and selling them wholesale and at craft fairs and art shows throughout the U.S.

                                    

Furniture Designer

1988-1990 Whitewind Furniture, 298 West Street, Santa Rosa, KS 19884

                  Mrs. Sharon Rock, Supervisor

 

Industrial Arts Instructor

1983-1986  Santa Rosa High School, 12 Marks Road, Santa Rosa, KS 19885

                              Mr. Mel Rosenbloom, Principle

 

EDUCATION

Associate of Arts  

 1976 Merrit College, Oakland, CA

Bachelor of Arts Creative Arts Interdisciplinary

 1978    California College of Arts and Crafts, Oakland, CA

 

OTHER  ACTIVITIES

Member: American Woodworkers Guild, Midwest Handcrafts Collective, Santa Rosa Art Trails

Guest Lecturer, Art Department, California College of Arts and Crafts

Articles on furniture design published in Fine Woodworker, 1984, 1987

First Place, American Craft Competition, Madison, Wisconsin, 1986

 

REFERENCES

Personal:

Mrs. Sharon Rock, 5 Martin Rd, Topeka, CA 96566

Robert Smith, 2783 Fisk Lane, Santa Rosa, CA 97544

Professional:

Dr. Pressnel Gibbs, 232 Grant Rd, Santa Rosa, CA 97534

Mr. Frank Hudley, 26 Hessel St., Santa Rosa, CA 97543

 

 

 

How to Use Microsoft Publisher

 

This is a short lesson about how to use Publisher. If you purchased Microsoft Office, Small Business Edition, you received Publisher at no extra charge. If you want to purchase it separately, it is available for under $100. It is a very useful program for creating brochures, order forms, business cards, hang tags, signs, price tags, and much more.

1. Start Publisher by clicking on the Start button, select Programs, then Applications, and select MS Publisher.

2. Click on Blank Page, then Full Page, then Okay.

3. Click on the box with the A in it on the left side of the page. Then draw a box by holding down the left mouse button and dragging the mouse to the lower right 2”.

4. Start typing. Click on the Plus (+) sign at the bottom to zoom in on your text.

5. Highlight the text by holding down the left mouse button and dragging the cursor over it. Then change the font type and size by clicking on the drop down arrows at the top of the page.

6. Click on the small black square at the lower right of the box, hold down the button, and make the square smaller to fit your text.

7. Hold the cursor at the bottom of the box until a truck appears with the word “Move.” Then hold down the button and move the box around.

8. Now, click on the picture of a cactus on the left side of the page. Make a box as you did earlier. This will be an image Box. You can manipulate it the same as the text box.

9. Double click on the center of the image box. An “Insert Picture File” window will appear with a list of images. Make sure “All Picture Formats” is selected next to Files of type. It might take a few minutes for all the images to appear. Use the yellow directory button with the arrow to search other folders on your hard drive for clip art.

10. Select an image. If the “Preview File” box to the right of the window is checked, then images in the left window will appear in the box to the right of the window to be previewed. Click on Okay, then Okay again to place the image in your document.

11. Select any of the small black squares on the image box to change the shape of the image. Try making it bigger or smaller, wider or taller. To make the image keep its proportion as you change its size, select a corner square and hold down the shift key as you change the size of the image box.

12. Finally, to move a box on top of another, just move it as shown earlier. If you want the hidden box to be on top, select it, then select Arrange, Bring to Front from the menu.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Letter to craft fair promoter for application (fairletter.doc)

 

When sending for craft fair applications, first select the desirable fairs from your craft fair list or guides. Write the addresses on #10 business envelopes. Add or delete questions from this letter as desired, then date and sign it. Make as many copies as you have address labels or addressed envelopes for.

 

Craft Fair Application Request

 

Date_____________

 

 

Dear Craft Fair Organizer:

 

Please forward an application and any other information about your upcoming show. I  would also like to be placed on your mailing list for future shows.  

 

If the following information is not included with your application, please write the answers on this letter and return it with the application.

 

• Do you provide or assist in canopy and table rental for this show?

 

• Are there nearby areas for self-contained RV parking?

 

• Do you allow amplified music in close proximity to the artists to the extent that they cannot converse with their customers without raising their voice?

 

• Do you give artists who demonstrate their craft preference in the jurying process?

 

• How many people attended the show last year?

 

Sincerely,

 

_________________________

 

Send information to:

 

 

Top 900 Craft Fairs and Art Shows in the United States

 

The following list consist of shows around the country that are usually worth traveling to. Exact show dates and deadline dates are not shown, because these change yearly.  When you write one of these shows and ask for information, they will send you an application with the correct dates at no charge.  Then you will have the exact dates of the show every year, and much more information than any guide can give you.

 

Here’s how to get your craft fair applications and organize them.

 

1. Get 12 file folders. Write the name of a month on each one. 12 folders, 12 months.

2. Get 50 stamps at the post office.

3. Get a box of 50 envelopes. A return address label or stamp is handy but not essential.

4. Write a letter by hand or with your word processor (see next page) asking for an application.  Make sure your name and address is on the letter in big, clear letters.  Make 50 copies of this letter.

5. Put the letters in the envelopes and put stamps on them.

6. Address the envelopes with shows on this list you might want to do.

7. Mail them.

8. When you get each application, write down the show name, show date, and deadline date on the deadline organizer in this book.

9. File the applications in the file folder for the month the show is held.

 

This is all you need to get up-dated, accurate information about the best shows every year in your mailbox.  Once you are on their mailing list, shows will send you applications every year without you having to write them again.

 

You may do better or worse at any of the shows listed here then I do.  I do not guarantee any of them, but after you do a few of them you will that they are better than most. It seems that at nearly every show I do, whether it is a well-known show or not, the craftsperson or artist on one side will take in much more money than I do, and the person on the other side will not do nearly as well as I do. The inclusion of specific shows is based on word of mouth, magazine articles, attendance, years show has been in business, and personal experience (I have done at least 250 of the shows on the list in the past 30 years),

 

I recommend writing the shows instead of calling them. Many shows do not have a full time staff member to answer phones.  In addition, they might get your address wrong over the phone.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The names and addresses listed here were accurate at the time this book went to print.

 

ST CRAFT FAIR ATT DATE ADDRESS CITY ST ZIP PHONE  

AL Magic City Art Connection 20,000 April 1128 Glen View Rd. Birmingham AL 35222 (205) 595-6306 B+

AL The Bluff Park Art Show 20,000 Oct. P. O. Box 26012 Birmingham AL 35226 (205) 408-4312 B+

AL Christmas Village Festival 45,000 Nov. P. O. Box 10441 Birmingham AL 35210 205-836-7178 A

AL Alabama Blueberry Festival 25,000 June 1010-B Douglas Avenue Brewton AL 36426 251-867-3224 B

AL Fairhope Arts and Crafts Festival 180,000 March P. O. Drawer 10 Dayhne AL 36526 334-621-8222 B

AL Foley Heritage Harbor Days 40,000 November P. O. Box 448 Foley AL 35636 251-943-1200 nr

AL Foley Art in the Park 35,000 May 119 West Laurel Avenue Foley AL 36535 251-943-4381 B

AL National Shrimp Festival 200,000 Oct. P. O. Box 3869 Gulf Shores AL 36547 251-968-6904 A+

AL Hartselle Depot Days 15,000 September P. O. Box 817 Hartselle AL 35640 256-773-4370 B

AL NEACA Fall Show 30,000 Sept. P. O. Box 1113 West Station Huntsville AL 35805 205-274-7918 A

AL NEACA Spring Craft Show 25,000 March 3206 Holmes Ave Huntsville AL 35816 256-533-3283 B+

AL NEACA Christmas Craft Show 25,000 December 13011 Percivale Drive Huntsville AL 35805 256-883-2199 B+

AL Delta Zone Market Place 15,000 November P. O. Box 18696 Huntsville AL 35804 256-894-0117 B

AL Panoply 85,000 April 700 Monroe St., Ste 2 Huntsville AL 35802 (256) 519-2787 B

AL Azalea Arts and Crafts Festival 25,000 October 4850 Museum Drive Mobile AL 36608 251-208-5200 B+

AL Mobile  Bay Fest 200,000 October P. O. Box 1827 Mobile AL 36633 251-470-7730 A-

AL Montgomery Festival in the Park 13,000 October 1010 Forest Avenue Montgomery AL 36106 334-241-2300 B

AL Festival in the Park 19,000 Oct. 1010 Forest Avenue Montgomery AL 36106 (334) 241-2300 B

AL Kentuck Festival of the Arts 32,000 Oct. 503 Main Avenue Northport AL 35476 (205) 758-1257 A-

AL Oxfordfest 17,000 October P. O. Box 3159 Oxford AL 36203 256-831-2934 B-

AL Cityfest Arts and Crafts Show 12,000 May 1002 East Main Street Prattville AL 36066 334-365-7392 nr

AL Selma Riverfront Market 35,000 October P. O. Box 565 Selma AL 36702 334-874-8044 B+

AL Homestead Hollow Christmas 13,000 November P. O. Box 190 Springville AL 35146 205-836-8483 B

AL Homestead Hollow Harvest 18,000 October P. O. Box 190 Springville AL 35146 205-836-8483 B

AL Christmas on the Coosa 20,000 December P. O. Box 936 Wetumpka AL 36092 334-567-1313 B

AR Arts & Carafts Festival 35,000 Oct. P. O. Box 5009 Bella Vista AR 72714 (479) 855-2064 A-

AR Applegate Place Autumn A&C Fest. 200,000 Oct. P. O. Box 1041 Bentonville AR 72712 479-273-7478 A

AR New Sugar Creek A and C Fair 300,000 October 201 N. W. J Street Bentonville AR  72712 479-273-3270 B+

AR Clarion Spring Arts and Crafts Show 10,000 May P. O. Box 1041 Bentonville AR 72712 479-273-7478 B-

AR Ole Applegate Arts and Crafts 30,000 September P. O. Box 1041 Bentonville AR 72712 479-273-7478 B+

AR Ole Applegate Spring Arts and Crafts 100,000 May P. O. Box 1041 Bentonville AR 72712 479-273-7478 B+

AR Mountain View Folkfest 60,000 April 2926 Highway 150 Blytheville AR 72560 870-763-5512 B

AR Beanfest 60,000 October 2926 Highway 150 Blytheville AR 72560 888-679-2859 B

AR BPW Barn Sale A and C 14,000 September 692 Jenkins Camden AR 71701 870-231-6244 nr

AR Toad Suck Daze 155,000 April 900 Oak Street Conway AZ 72032 501-327-7788 B

AR Old Fort River Festival 12,000 July P. O. Box 3025 Fort Smith AR 72913 479-783-6363 nr

AR Old Hardy Spring A & C 12,000 April P. O. Box 668 Hardy AR 72542 870-856-3571 nr

AR Harvest Homecoming 12,000 October P. O. Box 2049 Harrison AR 72601 870-741-4889 nr

AR Springfest 10,000 April 1001 West Main St. Heber Springs AR 72530

501-362-2444 nr

AR Hillbilly Corner Arts, Crafts & Antiques 25,000 May 22530 Deer Run Road Hindsville AR 72738 479-789-5685 B

AR War Eagle Fair 195,000 Oct. 11036 High Sky  Hindsville AR 72738 (479) 789-5398 A+

AR Hope Watermelon Festival 40,000 August P. O. Box 250 Hope AR 71801 870-777-3640 B+

AR Hot Springs Arts and Crafts Fair 50,000 October 121 Ellis Court Hot Springs AR 71902 501-767-0254 B+

AR Arkansas Apple Festival 45,000 October P. O. Box 382 Lincoln AR 72744 479-267-3916 B

AR Springdale Fall Craft Fest 20,000 October 5557 Walden Street Lowell AR 72745 479-756-2979 B

AR Old Timer's Days 40,000 May P. O. Box 245 Van Buren OR 72957 501-474-8322 B

AR Jonquil Festival 15,000 March P. O. Box 98 Washington AR 71862 870-983-2684 B

AR  Autumn Arts and Crafts Show 15,000 October P. O. Box 1041 Bentonville AR 72712 479-273-7478 B

AZ Peoria Stadium Fall Fest. Of A and C 10,000 November P. O. Box 1803 Cave Creek AZ 85327 480-488-2014 B

AZ Fair of Life Festival 10,000 July P. O. Box 997 Flagstaff AZ 86004 928-779-1227 nr

AZ Fine Arts and Wine Festival  March 15648 North Eagles Nest Dr. Fountain Hills AZ 85268 480-837-5637 A

AZ Fine Arts and Chocolate Festival 40,000 Feb. 15648 North Eagles Nest Dr. Fountain Hills AZ 85268 480-837-5637 B+

AZ Carefree Fine Art & Wine Festival 40,000 November 15648 N. Eagles Nest Dr. Fountain Hills AZ 85268 480-837-5637 A-

AZ Fountain Hills Great Fair 150,000 Nov. P O Box 17598 Fountain Hills AZ 85269 (602) 837-1654 A

AZ Desert Festival of Fine Arts 40,000 Aug. 15648 North Eagles Nest Dr. Fountain Hills AZ 85268 (480) 837-5637 A+

AZ Glendale Chocolate Affaire 75,000 February 5850 West Glendale Ave. Glendale AZ 85301 623-930-2959 B

AZ Litchfield Park Festival of the Arts 60,000 November 101 Wigwam Blvd. Litchfield Park AZ 85326 623-393-5338 B+

AZ Patagonia Fall Festival 15,000 October P. O. Box 241 Patagonia AZ 85624 520-394-0060 B

AZ Sonoran Festival of the Arts 12,000 April 9862 South 44th Street Phoenix AZ 85044 480-598-9090 nr

AZ Prescott Courthouse Plaza A and C 15,000 July 4196 Coburn Prescott AZ 86392 928-771-1498 B

AZ Scottsdale Arts Festival 50,000 March 7380 E 2nd ST. Scottsdale AZ 85251 (602) 994-2787 B+

AZ Sedona Arts Festival 5,000 Oct. P. O. Box 2729 Sedona AZ 86339 (928) 204-9456 A-

AZ Art in the Park 10,000 Oct. P. O. Box  247 Sierra Vista AZ 85636 (520) 378-1763 A-

AZ Sierra Vista Art in the Park 20,000 October P. O. Box 247 Sierra Vista AZ 85636 520-378-1763 B

AZ Fall Festival of the Arts 230,000 Dec. 520 South Mill Avenue #201 Tempe AZ 85281 480-967-4877 A-

AZ Artfest of Fifth Avenue 22,000 October P. O. Box 328 Tempe AZ 85280 480-968-5353 B

AZ Fagstaff Festival in the Pines 45,000 July P. O. Box 328 Tempe AZ 85280 480-968-5353 B+

AZ Tempe Spring Festival of the Arts 300,000 March 520 S. Mill Ave., Suite 201 Tempe AZ 85281 (602) 967-4877 A-

AZ Festival of the Arts 250,000 Feb. P O Box 1866 Tubac AZ 85646 (520) 398-9296 B+

AZ 4th Avenue Street Fair (Spring) 300,000 March 329 E 7th Tucson AZ 85705 (800) 933-2477 A

AZ Fourth Avenue Street Fair 325,000 December 329 East Seventh Street Tucson AZ 85705 520-624-5004 A-

AZ Yuma Christmas Craft Festival 20,000 December 180 First Street Ste C Yuma AZ 85364 928-782-5712 B

CA Cupertino Rotary Octoberfest 30,000 October P. O. Box 1343 Alameda CA 94501 510-865-3636 B

CA Art Affaira 9,000 Oct. 3051 Via Maderas Altadena CA 91001 818-797-6803 A

CA North Country Fair and Harvest Cel. 10,000 September P. O. Box 664 Arcata CA 95518 707-822-5320 B

CA CATALINA FESTIVAL OF ART 15,000 Sept. P O Box 235 Avalon CA 90704 (310) 510-0808 B+

CA KPFA Holiday Crafts Fair 10,000 December 1919 Mlk Jr. Way Berkeley CA 94704 510-848-6767 B+

CA LIVE OAK PARK FAIR 5,000 June P O Box 9188 Berkeley CA 94709 (510) 526-7363 B

CA KPFA HOLIDAY CRAFTS FAIR 10,000 Dec. 1929 Mlk Jr Way Berkeley CA 94704 (510) 848-6767 A-

CA Affaire in the Gardens (Fall) 60,000 Oct. 8400 Gregory Way Beverly Hills CA 90211 (310) 550-4628 A-

CA Big Bear Lake Octoberfest 15,000 September P. O. Box 7186 Big Bear Lake CA 92315 909-585-3000 nr

CA Boulder Creek Art and Wine Fest.  May 12805 Highway 9 Boulder CA 95006 831-338-2578 B

CA Burlingame Art in the Park 35,000 June P. O. Box 1963 Burlingame CA 94011 650-348-7699 B

CA Los Gatos Fiesta De Artes 30,000 August P. O. Box 1963 Burlingame CA 94011 650-348-7699 B

CA Avocado Festival 110,000 October P. O. Box 146 Carpenteria CA 93014 805-684-0038 A-

CA Downtown Burbank Fine Arts Fest 15,000 November P. O. Box 4389 Chatsworth CA 91311 818-709-2907 B

CA Warner Park Fine Arts and Crafts 15,000 November P. O. Box 4389 Chatsworth CA 91311 818-709-2907 B

CA Desert Arts Festival, Palm Springs 15,000 December P. O. Box 4389 Chatsworth CA 91311 818-709-2907 B

CA Village Arts Festival 30,000 Nov. P. O. Box 4389 Chatsworth CA 91311 (818) 709-2907 B

CA 4th of July Arts and Craft Show 10,000 July P. O. Box 977 Chester CA 96020 530-258-2677 nr

CA Village Venture A and C Faire 20,000 October 205 Yale Avenue Claremont CA  91711 909-624-1681 B

CA Riverside Dickens Festival 25,000 February P. O. Box 1959 Corona CA 92879 909-735-0101 B

CA Courtland Pear Fair 15,000 July P. O. Box 492 Courtland CA 95615 916-775-2000 B

CA Whole Earth Festival 20,000 May 260 S. Silo Davis CA 95616 (916) 752-2569 B

CA Fairfield Tomato Festival 45,000 August 1000 Texas Street #D Fairfield CA 94533 707-422-0103 B

CA International Gourd Art Festival 10,000 June 40635-D De Luz Road Fallbrook CA 92928 760-728-4271 nr

CA Folsom Christmas Art and Craft Fair 20,000 December 724-26 Sutter Street Folsom CA  95630 916-941-6714 B

CA Peddlers Fair 30,000 September 724-26 Sutter Street Folsom CA 95630 530-241-4063 B

CA Fine Art Show at River Park 40,000 October 1756 West Bullard Fresno CA 93650 559-449-9818 B

CA Gilroy Garlick Festival 125,000 July P O Box 2311 Gilroy CA 95021 (408) 842-1625 A-

CA Pumkin Festival 200,000 Oct. P O Box 274 Half Moon Bay CA 94019 (415) 726-9652 B+

CA Hayward Zucchini Festival 26,000 August P. O. Box 247 Hayward  CA 94543 510-264-9466 B-

CA Contemporary Craft Market 11,000 June 575 Cooke St. A2820 Honolulu HI 96813 808-422-7362 A

CA Contemporary Crafts Market 12,000 Nov. 575 Cooke St A2820 Honolulu HI 96813 (808) 422-7362 A

CA Indio Tamale Festival 120,000 December 100 Civic Center Mall Indio CA 92201 760-342-6532 B

CA Festival of the Arts 17,000 Sept. 4130 La Jolla Vil. Dr.7 La Jolla CA 92037 619-456-1268 A+

CA La Qiomta Arts Festival 25,000 March P O Box 777 La Quinta CA 92253 760-564-1244 A-

CA Winter Fantasy Laguna Beach 20,000 November 935 Laguna Canyon Road Laguna Beach CA 92651 949-494-3030 A-

CA Sawdust Festival 200,000 July/Aug. 935 Laguna Canyon Road Laguna Beach CA 92651 (949) 494-3030 A

CA Art-A-Fair Festival 50,000 June P. O. Box 547 Laguna Beach CA 92652 (714) 494-4514 B+

CA Museum of Art Artists Market 4,000 June 2300 East Ocean Long Beach CA 90803 310-439-2119 A-

CA Hist. Society Craft Fair 15,000 August P. O. Box 286 Long Beach CA 11561 516-432-1192 B-

CA Fiesta Broadway 55,000 April 2130 San Telle Blvd Ste 304 Los Angeles CA 90025 310-914-1933 B

CA Spring May Day Fair 55,000 April P. O. Box 71 Los Banos CA 93635 209-826-5166 B

CA Los Altos Rotary Art Show 9,000 May 132 Belvue Dr. Los Gatos CA 95032 (408) 358-3373 B+

CA Labor Day Festival 15,000 Aug. P. O. Box 56 Mammoth Lakes CA 93546 (760) 873-7042 A-

CA California Peach Festival 62,000 July P. O. Box 3231 Marysville CA 95993 530-671-9599 B

CA Mill Falley Fall Arts Festival 15,000 Sept. P O Box 300 Mill Valley CA 94942 (415) 381-0525 A

CA Millbrae Art and Wine Festival 80,000 Aug. 50 Victoria Ave. Ste. 103 Millbrae CA 94030 (415) 697-8737 B

CA Montrose Arts and Crafts Festival 55,000 June P. O. Box 187 Montrose CA 91021 818-248-3829 B+

CA Morro Bay Harbor Festival 25,000 October P. O. Box 18696 Morro Bay CA 93443 805-772-1155 B

CA Four Seasons Arts and Crafts Fest 12,000 July P. O. Box 5672 Norco CA 92860 909-735-4751 B

CA Great Dickens Christmas Fair 20,000 November P. O. Box 1768 Novato CA 94948 800-510-1558 B

CA Festoval at the Lake 45,000 June 1630 Webster Oakland CA 94612 (510) 286-1061 B+

CA Oceanside Harbor Days 75,000 September 928 North Coast Highway Oceanside CA 92054 760-722-1534 B+

CA Southwest Arts Festival  Feb. P. O. Box 62 Palm Desert CA 92261 760-346-0042 B

CA Harvest Festival 30,000 Nov. 601 N. Mcdowell Petaluma CA 94954 (707) 778-6300 A-

CA Strawberry Festival 65,000 May P O Box 280 Pine Grove CA 95665 (209) 296-1195 A-

CA Wildlife Art Festival 5,000 Nov. 2024 Orange Tree Ln. Redlands CA 92374 (909) 798-8570 B+

CA Fiesta Hermosa Arts and Crafts 150,000 May 1926 S. Pc  Hwy #109-B Redondo Beach CA 90501 310-316-0951 A-

CA Lilac Festival Arts and Crafts 400,000 May 171 Reservoir Avenue Rochester NY 14620 585-256-4960 A

CA Route 66 Rendezvous 550,000 Sept. 201 North 3. Street Ste 103 San Bernadino CA 92401 800-867-8366  B

CA San Carlos Art and Wine Faire 70,000 October P. O. Box 1086 San Carlos CA 94070 209-296-1195 B

CA CityFest 2005 170,000 August P. O. Box 3655 San Diego CA 92163 619-299-3330 B+

CA Castro Street Fair 150,000 October P. O. Box 14405 San Francisco CA 94114 415-841-1824 B

CA San Francisco State A and C Fair 26,000 April Sc T-115, 1650 Holloway San Francisco CA 94132 415-338-2444 B

CA Almaden Valley Art and Wine Fest 23,000 September P. O. Box 20084 San Jose CA 95160  B

CA Tapestry in Talent 75,000 Aug. 255 N. Market St #124 San Jose CA 95110 (408) 494-3490 A-

CA Berryessa Art and Wine Festival 7,000 May 1127 Summergarden Ct.  San Jose CA 95132 (408) 272-1578 B

CA Artwalk Festival of Art 5,000 Oct. 2559 Puesta Del Sol Santa Barbara CA 93105 (805) 682-4711 B

CA Rotary Art Show 30,000 May P. O. Box 2215 Saratoga CA 95070 (408) 725-2434 A

CA Sausalito Arts Festival 50,000 Aug. P O Box 10 Sausalito CA 94966 (415) 332-3555 A+

CA Connoisser’s Market Place 80,000 July 1384 Weston Road Scotts Valley CA 95066 831-438-4751 A-

CA Palo Alto Festival of the Arts 25,000 Aug. 1384 Weston Road Scotts Valley CA 95066 (831) 438-4751 A

CA Sherman Oaks Street Fair 80,000 October 14827 Ventura Blvd. Ste 207 Sherman Oaks CA 91403 818-906-1951 B

CA University Holiday Craft Faire 15,000 Dec. P O Box 6508 Stanford CA 94309 (415) 723-3542 B+

CA Asparagus Festival 100,000 April 425 N. El Dorado St. Stockton CA 95202 (209) 937-7488 B

CA Tehachapi Mountain Festival 40,000 August P. O. Box 401 Tehachapi CA 93561 661-822-4180 B

CA Artwalk 18,000 June P O Box 1616 Thousand Oaks CA 91358 (805) 492-8778 B+

CA Redwood Empire Fair 25,000 August 1055 North State Street Ukiah CA 95482 707-462-3884 B

CA Nuts for Art 15,000 October 15954 Woods Valley Road Valley Center CA 92082 760-749-3388 nr

CA Kings Mountain Art Fair 20,000 Sept. 13106 Skyline Boulevard Woodside CA 94062 (650) 851-2710 A+

CA  Beaumont Cherry Festival 60,000 June P. O. Box 307 Beaumont CA 92223 909-845-9541 B+

CA  Corte Madera 4th of July Fair 10,000 July 129 Town Center Corte Madera CA 94925 415-924-0441 B-

CA  Fairfield Candy Festival 50,000 October 1000 Texas Street #D Fairfield CA 94533 707-422-0103 B

CA  Country Folk Art Craft Show 20,000 Nov. 15045 Dixie Highway Holly MI 48442 248-634-4151 B

CA  Celebration Of Craftswomen 10,000 November 3453 18th Street San Francisco CA 94110 415-431-1180 A-

CA  Topanga Country Fair 12,000 May P. O. Box 1611 Tompanga CA 90290 310-455-1890 B

CO Halloween With Horses 12,000 October 46100 Cr 65 Bennet  CO 80102 303-621-8081 nr

CO Downtown Boulder Fall Festival 55,000 September 1942 Broadway #301 Boulder CO 80302 303-484-0820 B

CO Artfair 50,000 July P. O. Box 1634 Boulder CO 80306 (303) 499-0199 B

CO Breckenridge July Art Festival 30,000 July P. O. Box 2938 Breckenridge CO 80424 970-547-9326 B

CO Mountain Fair 15,000 July P O Box 175 Ccarbondale CO 81623 (970) 963-1680 B

CO Colorado Springs Territory Days 140,000 May 211 Farragut Colorado Springs CO 80909 719-475-0955 A-

CO Crested Butte Festival Of The Arts 10,000 Aug. Box 324 Crested Butte CO 81224 (970) 349-1184 B+

CO A Taste Of Colorado 500,000 Sept. 511 16th St. Ste 200 Denver CO 80202 303-295-6330 A-

CO Littleton Pumpkin Festival 13,000 October 909 York Street Denver CO 80206 720-865-3554 nr

CO Colorado Arts Festival 170,000 May P. O. Box 101870 Denver CO 80250 303-388-2137 B+

CO Cherry Creek Arts Festival 350,000 July 2 Steele Street B100 Denver CO 80206 (303) 355-2787 A+

CO Capitol Hill Peoples Fair 275,000 June 1490 Lafayette #104 Denver CO 80218 (303) 830-1651 B

CO Evergreen Arts Festival 10,000 Aug. P. O. Box 1511 Evergreen CO 80439 (303) 838-3948 B+

CO Greely Arts Picnic 33,000 July 651 Tenth Avenue Greeley CO 80631 970-350-9451 B

CO Jones Quality Arts And Craft Show 20,000 October 844 S. 291 Hwy, #323 Liberty MO 64068 816-781-8110 B-

CO Friends Of The Museum Craft Fair 20,000 October 6028 South Gallup Littleton CO 80120 303-795-3950 B+

CO Manitou Springs A And C Festival 30,000 September P. O. Box 42 Manitou Springs CO 80829 719-577-7700 B

CO Beaver Creek Arts Festival 25,000 Aug. 9695 West Broward Blvd. Plantation FL 33324 954-472-3755 B

CO Denver’s Holiday Gift Festival 33,000 July P. O. Box 91369 Portland OR 97291 503-526-1080 B

CO Snowmass Arts And Crafts Fair 10,000 July P. O. Box 5566 Snowmass Village CO 81615 (970) 923-2000 A-

CO Steamboat Springs Art In The Park 10,000 July P. O. Box 774284 Steamboat Springs CO 80477 970-879-9008 B

CO Vail Arts Festival 20,000 July P O Box 1153 Vail CO 81658 (970) 476-4255 A

CT Craft Village Arts And Crafts Festival 10,000 Oct. 779 East Main St. Branford CT 06405 (203) 488-4689 B

CT On The Green Art And Craft Show 10,000 Sept. P. O. Box 304 Glastonbury CT 06033 (203) 659-1196 B

CT Crafts Fest Pf The Brice Museum 15,000 May 1 Museum Dr. Greenwich CT 06830 (203) 869-0376 B+

CT Guilford Handcraft Exhib. 20,000 July P. O. Box 589 Gilford CT 06437 (203) 453-5947 A+

CT Mystic Seaport Outdoor Art Festival 60,000 Aug. P. O. Box 300 Mystic CT 06355 (860) 572-7844 B

CT Christmas Crafts Expo 18,000 Dec. P. O. Box 227 North Granby CT 06060 860-653-6671 B

CT Old Saybrook Art And Craft Show 250,000 July P. O. Box 625 Old Saybrook CT 06475 (860) 388-3266 B

CT Oyster Festival 90,000 Sept. 132 Water St. South Norwalk CT 06854 (203) 838-9444 A-

CT Sono Arts Celebration 60,000 Aug. P O Box 500 South Norwalk CT 06856 (203) 866-7916 B

CT Westport Handcrafts Show 10,000 May 10 Lyons Plains Road Weston CT 06883 (203) 227-7844 A

CT Creative Arts Festival 8,000 Nov. 144 Iimperial Ave. Westport CT 06880 (203) 222-1388 A-

CT Dtn Merchants Outdoor Art Show 30,000 July P O Box 5132 Westport CT 06880 (203) 454-8688 B

CT  Celebrate West Hardford A & C Show 30,000 May 50 South Main Street West Hartford CT 06107 860-570-3705 B

DC Washington Craft Show 10,000 Nov. P. O. Box 603 Greens Farms CT 06436 (203) 254-0486 A+

DC Smithsonian Craft Show 20,000 April A & I Bldg, Rm 1465  Washington DC 20560 (202) 357-4000 A+

DC National Christmas Show 38,000 Nov. P. O. Box 11565 Winston Salem NC 27116 910-924-8337 A+

DE Deleware Fine Art And Craft Show 10,000 July P. O. Box 347 Ardmore PA 19003 877-244-9768 B

DE Boardwalk Arts Festival 8,000 Sept. P O Box 881 Bethany Beach DE 19930 (800) 962-7873 B+

DE Dover Officer Spouses Club Craft Show 10,000 November P. O. Box 02069 Dover DE 19901 302-677-6032 B

DE Sea Witch Halloween And Fiddlers 150,000 October P. O. Box 216 Rehoboth Beach DE 19971 302-227-2233 B

DE Brandywine Arts Festival 35,000 Sept. 2903 B Philadelphia Pike Wilmington DE 19703 (302) 529-0761 A-

FL Fall Country Jamboree 18,000 November P. O. Box 5 Barberville FL 32105 386-749-2959 B

FL Arts Festival 150,000 March 1800 N. Dixie Hwy. Boca Raton FL 33432 (407) 395-4433 B

FL Boca Museum Art Festival 50,000 Feb. 801 W. Palmetto Park Rd. Boca Raton FL 33486 (561) 392-2500 A+

FL Fiesta Of Arts 30,000 Feb. 150 Nw Crawford Blvd Boca Raton FL 33432 (407) 393-7827 B

FL The Riverview Art Fest. 10,000 Jan. P. O. Box 1346 Cape Coral FL 33910 (941) 945-1988 B

FL Celebration Fall Art Festival 50,000 October 671 Front Street Ste 210 Celebration FL 34747 407-566-1200 B

FL Artrt HARVEST IN THE PARK 60,000 Nov. 1265 Bayshore Blvd. Clearwater FL 34698 (727) 738-5523 B

FL Space Coast Art Festival 100,000 Nov. P. O. Box 320135 Cocoa Beach FL 32932 (407) 784-3322 B

FL Coconut Grove Arts Festival 800,000 Feb. 3427 Main Highway Coconut Grove FL 33233 (305) 447-0401 A+

FL Banyan Arts & Crafts Festival 40,000 Nov. 2820 Mcfarlane Rd. Coconut Grove FL 33233 (305) 444-7270 B

FL St Stephen's Arts & Crafts Show 750,000 Feb. 2750 Mcfarlane Rd Coconut Grove FL 33133 (305) 558-1758 B+

FL Florida Manatee Fine Arts Show 40,000 Feb. 28 Nw Hwy 19 Crystal River FL 34428 (904) 795-3149 B

FL Deerfield Beach Fest. Of The Arts 25,000 Jan. 150 N.E. 2nd Ave Deerfield Beach FL 33441 (454) 421-6161 B

FL Deland Fall Festival Of The Arts 54,000 November P. O. Box 3194 Deland FL 32721 386-738-5705 B

FL Delray Affair 250,000 April 64 Se 5th Ave. Delray Beach FL 33483 561-279-1380 B

FL Isle Of Eight Flags Shrimp Fest 175,000 May P.O. Box 1251 Fernandina Beach FL 32035 904-261-7020 A-

FL Holiday Arts And Crafts Show 12,000 Nov. Pmb 275, 16520 Tamiami Trail #18 Fort Meyers FL 33908 508-737-0998 A-

FL Fort Myers Arts And Crafts Show 12,000 January 16520 S. Tamiami Trail #18 Fort Myers FL 02536 315-852-1114 nr

FL Lido Keys Holiday A And C Show 12,000 December 16520 S. Tamaimi Trail #18 Fort Myers FL 33908 508-737-0998 B

FL Fishermen's Village Fall A And C 16,000 October 16520 S. Tamaima Trail #18 Fort Myers FL 33908 508-737-0998 B

FL Naples Art And Craft Show 12,000 March 16520 S. Tamaimi Trail #18 Fort Myers FL 33908 508-737-0998 B

FL Saint Simon's On The Sound Craft 25,000 November 28 Miricle Strip Parkway Fort Walton Beach FL 32548 850-244-8621 B

FL Promenade In The Park 75,000 Nov. P. O.  Box 2307 Ft Lauderdale FL 33303 (954) 764-5973 B

FL Riverwalk Arts And Crafts Show 100,000 Jan. 301 N. Andrews Ave Ft. Lauderdale FL 33301 305-761-5359 A-

FL Santa Fe C. College Spring Arts Fest 129,000 April 3000 Nw 83rd St. Gainesville FL 32606 (352) 392-5355 B

FL Carols In The Park 28,000 December P. O. Box 2237 Haines City FL 33845 239-573-6764 B

FL Acc Craft Fair 11,000 Dec. 21 South Eltings Corner Rd Highland NY 12528 800-836-3470 B

FL Anna Maria Island Winterfest 20,000 December 5312 Holmes Boulevard Holms Beach FL 34217 941-778-2099 B

FL Homosassa Art, Craft And Seafood 30,000 November P. O. Box 709 Homosassa FL 34447 352-628-2666 B

FL Artworks 3,000 May P O Box 41564 Jacksonville FL 32203 (904) 387-7007 B

FL Key Biscayne Arts Festival 25,000 January P. O. Box 490174 Key Biscayne FL 33149 305-361-0049 B-

FL Old Island Days Art Festival 25,000 Feb. 3124 Riviera Dr. Key West FL 3040 (305) 294-0431 A+

FL Osceola Art Festival 10,000 November P. O. Box 451088 Kissimmee FL 34745 407-846-6257 B-

FL Festival Of The Masters 125,000 Nov. Box 10150 (Walt Disney World) Lake Buena Vista FL 32830 407-934-6743 A

FL Heathrow Festival Of The Arts 125,000 Oct. P. O. Box 952125 Lake Mary FL 32795 (407) 585-2086 B

FL Lutz Arts And Crafts Festival 35,000 December P. O. Box 656 Lutz FL 33548 813-949-7060 B

FL Grouper Fest And Art Market 24,000 October 150 John's Pass Boardwlk Madeira Beach FL 33706 813-645-4954 B

FL Maitland Rotary Arts Fest 100,000 Oct. P. O. Box 941234 Maitland FL 32794 (407) 263-5218 B+

FL Marco Art 8,000 Feb. 1010 Winterberry Driv Marco Island FL 34145 239-394-4221 B+

FL Christmas Made In The South 35,000 Nov. P. O. Box 853 Matthews NC 28106 704-847-9480 A+

FL 1890's Mcintosh Festival 35,000 October P. O. Box 1890 Mcintosh FL 32664 352-591-1890 B

FL Melbourne Art Festival 50,000 April P.O. Box 611 Melbourne FL 32902 321-722-1964 B+

FL Artworks Of Eau Gallie 12,000 November 1490 Highland Ave, Ste. A Melbourne FL 32935 321-242-1456 nr

FL Historical Museum Of Southern FL 30,000 November 101 West Flagler Street Miami FL 33130 305-375-1492 nr

FL Miami Beach Festival Of The Arts 50,000 March 1700 Civic Center Drive Miami Beach FL 33139 (305) 673-7577 B

FL Mount Dora Craft Show 250,000 Oct. P. O. Box 378 Mount Dora FL 32756 352-735-1191 A-

FL Mount Dora Arts Festival 250,000 Feb. 138 E 5th Ave Mount Dora FL 32757 (352) 383-0880 B

FL Invitational Art Fest 10,000 Jan. P.O. Box 995 Naples FL 34106 941-263-1667 B+

FL Naples National Art  Festival 60,000 Feb. P O Box 839 Naples FL 34106 (239) 513-2492 B+

FL Images In Art Show 30,000 Oct. P. O. Box 6229 Ocala FL 34478 (352) 867-4788 B

FL Fiesta In The Park 200,000 Nov. P. O. Box 1883 Orlando FL 32802 407-246-2827 A

FL Halifax Art Festival 20,000 Oct. P. O. Box 2038 Ormond Beach FL 32175 (904) 673-2098 B

FL Great Day In The Country 60,000 November P. O. Box 621607 Oviedo FL 32762 407-365-9420 B

FL Florida Azalea Festival 25,000 March 623 Saint Johns Ave. Palatka FL 32177 386-328-4021 B

Fl Palatka Blue Crab Festival 200,000 May P. O. Box 1351 Palatka FL 32178 386-325-4406 B+

FL Artigras 100,000 Feb. 1983 Pga Blvd, #104 Palm Beach Gardens FL 33408 (561) 433-9000 B

FL Artigras Fine Arts Festival 150,000 Feb. 1983 Pga Blvd, #104 Palm Beach Gardens FL 33401 561-694-0126   A-

FL Palm Harbor Arts, Crafts And Music 15,000 December 1151 Nebraska Avenue Palm Harbor FL 34683 727-784-4287 B

FL Saint Andrews Fall Seafood Fest 22,000 September 1618 Isabella Avenue Panama City FL 32410 850-784-9542 B

FL Panama City Beach Indian Summer 60,000 October P. O. Box 9473 Panama City FL 32417 850-233-5070 B-

FL Great Gulfcoast Art Festival 150,000 Nov. P. O. Box 731 Pensacola FL 32594 (904) 432-9906 A-

FL Strawberry Festivale 750,000 Feb P. O. Drawer 1869 Plant City FL 33563 813-752-9194 A

FL Florida Strawberry Festival 600,000 Feb. P. O. Drawer 1869 Plant City FL 33564 (813) 752-9194 A+

FL Downtown Delray Festival 125,000 Jan. 9695 West Broward Blvd Plantation FL 33324 954-472-3755 B

FL Los Olas Art Fair 100,000 Jan. 1350 W. Broward Blvd. Plantation FL 33324 954-472-3755 B

FL Downtown Festival Of The Arts 90,000 Feb. 9695 West Broward Blvd Plantation FL 33324 954-472-3755 B

FL Old Hyde Park Village Art Festival 65,000 Oct. 9695 West Broward Blvd Plantation FL 33324 954-472-3755 A

FL Plantation Art In The Park 50,000 October P. O. Box 15473 Plantation FL 33318 954-797-9762 B

FL Baptist Hospital Artist's Showcase 30,000 April P. O. Box 800035 Roswell GA 30075 800-293-4983 A-

FL Baptist Hospital Artists Showcase 40,000 Nov. P. O. Box 800035 Roswell GA 30075 800-293-4983 B+

FL Safety Harbor Holiday A And C Show 30,000 December 125 5th Ave. North Safety Harbor FL 34695 727-725-1562 B

FL Saint Cloud Craft Festival 18,000 December P. O. Box 700522 Saint Cloud FL 34770 407-892-1667 B

FL Rotary Club Arts And Crafts Fair 10,000 Feb. Box 736 Sanibel FL 33957 239-489-4862 B

FL Sarasota Arts Day 15,000 January 1226 N. Tamaimi Trail #300 Sarasota FL 34236 941-365-5118 B+

FL Museum Of Art Las Olas Art Festival 50,000 March 8 Seneca Road Sea Ranch Lakes FL 33308 (954) 942-9697 B

FL Highlands Art Festival 20,000 November 351 West Center Avenue Sebring FL 33870 863-385-5312 B

FL South Miami Art Festival 50,000 November 6410 S. W. 80th Street South Miami FL 33141 305-661-1621 B+

FL Artexp. O. South Miami 45,000 January 7800 Red Road, Ste 215d South Miami FL 33143 305-558-1758 B

FL Beaux Arts Festival Of Art 100,000 Jan. P O Box 431216 South Miami FL 33143 (305) 789-9254 B

FL South Miami Art  Festival 60,000 Nov. 6410 Sw 80th South Miami FL 33143 (305) 661-1621 B

FL St Augustine Art & Crafts Festival 25,000 March 22 Marine St St. Augustine FL 32084 (904) 824-0716 B

FL Mainsail Arts Festival 90,000 April P O Box 2842 St. Petersburg FL 33731 727-892-5885 A-

FL Market Days 16,000 Dec. Pmb107 3491 1f Thomas Road Tallahassee FL 32308 850-576-9820 A

FL Gasparilla Festival Of The Arts 300,000 March P O Box 10591 Tampa FL 33679 (813) 876-1747 A

FL Tarpoon SPRINGS ARTS & CRAFTS FESTIVAL 50,000 April 210 S. Pinellas Ave. Ste120 Tarpon Springs FL 34689 (813) 937-6109 B+

FL Temple Terrace Community Arts Fest 15,000 November P. O. Box 291266 Temple Terrace FL 33687 813-989-7181 B

FL Indian River Festival A And C Show 30,000 April 2000 S. Washington St. 1 Titusville FL 32780 321-267-3036 B

FL Under The Oaks Arts Festival 30,000 March 3001 Riverside Park Dr Vero Beach FL 32963 (407) 231-0707 B+

FL Sunfest 325,000 May 525 Clematis St. West Palm Beach FL 33401 (561) 659-5980 A-

FL Winter Park Autumn Art Festival 60,000 Oct. P. O. Box 280 Winter Park FL 32790 407-646-2284 A-

FL Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival 350,000 March P. O. Box 597 Winter Park FL 32789 407-672-6390 A+

GA Dogwood Festival 300,000 April 20 Executive Park Dr # 2019 Atlanta GA 30329 404-329-0501 A

GA Arts Festival Of Atlanta 100,000 Sept. 140 First Union Atlanta, GA 30309 (404) 589-8777 A+

GA Canton Riverfest 24,000 September P. O. Box 1132 Canton GA 30169 770-704-5991 B

GA Paulding Meadows A And C Festival 25,000 September P. O. Box 654 Dallas GA 30132 770-505-1987 B

GA Prater's Mill Country Fair 10,000 May 848 Sugart Rd Dalton GA 30720 (706) 275-6455 A

GA Possum Hollow Arts And Crafts Fair 15,000 September P. O. Box 584 Dexter GA 31019 478-875-3200 B

GA Duluth Fall Festival 95,000 September P. O. Box 497 Duluth GA 30096 770-476-0240 B

GA Peachtree Art And Craft Show 13,000 Nov. 4664 North Peachtree Road Dunwoody GA 30338 404-451-4613 A+

GA Georgia Apple Festival 50,000 October P. O. Box 505 Ellijay GA 30540 706-636-4500 B+

GA Mule Camp Market 50,000 October P. O. Box 36 Gainesville GA 30503 770-714-9309 B

GA Lazy Daze In Georgia, Georgia Mall 50,000 July 5010 Strickland Rd Gainseville GA 30507 770-967-4753 B

GA Cotton Pickin' Country Fair 30,000 Oct. P. O. Box 1 Gay GA 30218 706-538-6814 A-

GA Georgia Mountain Fair 100,000 Aug. P. O. Box 444 Us 76 West Hiawassee GA 30546 706-896-4191 A+

GA Christmas Made In The South 20,000 Nov. P. O. Box 853 Matthews NC 28106 704-847-9480 B+

GA Spring Made In The South Augusta 18,000 March P. O. Box 853 Matthews NC 28106 704-847-9480 B+

GA Brown's Crossing Festival 12,000 Oct. 400 Brown's Crossing Milledgeville GA 31061 912-452-9327 A-

GA Calico Holiday Arts And Crafts Fair 15,000 November 290-G Harper Boulevard Moultrie GA 31788 229-985-1968 B

GA Powers' Crossroads Art Fest 50,000 Aug. 4766 W. Hwy. 34 Newnan GA 30263 (770) 253-2011 A+

GA Norcross Artfest 15,000 October P. O. Box 331 Norcross GA 30091 770-729-0200 B

GA Telfair Museum Of Art Art Fair 10,000 November P. O. Box 10081 Savannah GA 31412 912-232-1177 nr

GA Peachtree Crossings County Fair 30,000 Sept. 3869 Redbud Court Smyrna GA 30082 404-434-3661 A-

GA Million Pines A And C Festival 15,000 November P. O. Box 135 Soperton GA  912-529-6611 B

GA Yellow Daisy Festival 200,000 Sept. P. O. Box 778 Stone Mountain GA 30086 (770) 498-5633 A+

GA Mossy Creek Barnyard A And C+B340 20,000 Oct. 106 Anne Drive Warner Robins GA 31093 912-922-8265 A

IA Autumn Fest Arts & Crafts Affair 20,000 Oct. Box 184 Boys Town  NE 68010 402-331-2889 A

IA Art In The Park 5,000 June P. O. Box 2164 Clinton, IA 52733 (815) 772-8856 B

IA Quad Cty Riverssance Fine Arts Fest 15,000 Sept. P. O. Box 2183 Davenport IA 52809 (319) 386-7013 B

IA Beaux Art Invitational Spring Art Fair 27,000 May 3 North Garfield Ct. Davenport IA 52801 563-323-9042 B

IA Two Rivers Art Expo. 8,000 Nov. 4055 Sw 30th St. Des Moines IA 50321 (515) 285-6765 B

IA Art In The Park 20,000 June 4700 Grand Ave. Des Moines IA 50312 (515) 277-4405 B+

IA Iowa Arts Festival 40,000 June P. O. Box 3128 Iowa City IA 52244 319-337-7944 B

IA Mcgregor Spring A And C Festival 10,000 May P. O. Box 105 Mcgregor IA 52157 800-896-0910 nr

IA Antiques, Craft, And Collectables 10,000 September 124 S. Main Mount Pleasant IA 52641 319-385-3101 nr

IA Storm Lake Spectacular 30,000 July P. O. Box 584 Storm Lake IA 50588 712-732-3787 B

ID Boise River Festival 500,000 June 404 S. 8th St. Ste 404 Boise ID 83702 208-338-8887 B

ID Art In The Park 175,000 Sept. 670 S Julia Davis Dr. Boise ID 83702 (208) 345-8330 B

ID Art On The Green 50,000 Aug. P O Box 901 Coeur D'arlene ID 83816 (208) 667-9346 B+

ID Sun Valley Arts & Crafts Festival 20,000 Aug. P. O. Box 656 Ketchum ID 83353 (208) 726-9491 A+

ID Mccall Winter Carnival 75,000 January P. O. Box 350 Mccall ID 83638 208-634-7631 B

IL Baac Art Fair 2,500 June 207 Park Ave Barrington IL 60010 (847) 382-5626 B+

IL Art In The Barn 8,000 Sept. 450 W. Hwy 22 Barrington IL 60010 (847) 842-4496 B+

IL Art On The Square 42,000 May P. O. Box 23561 Belleville IL 62223 618-257-0747 A-

IL Autumn Festival 30,000 Nov. P. O. Box 184 Boys Town NE 68010 402-331-2889 A+

IL Celebrate On State Street 600,000 June 16w129 83rd Street Burr Ridge IL 60521 708-325-8080 A+

IL Arlington Racecourse Art, Craft And Folk 15,000 November 16W129 83rd Street Burr Ridge IL 60006 630-325-8080 B

IL Lambs Farm Holiday Art And Craft 20,000 December 16W129 83rd Street Burr Ridge IL 60527 630-325-8080 B

IL Orland Square Art And Craft Show 50,000 February 16W129 83rd Street Burr Ridge IL 60527 630-325-8080 B

IL Carlinville Christmas Market 15,000 December 126 Main Street Carlinville IL 62626 217-854-2141 B

IL Urbana Arts And Crafts Festival 50,000 June 301 North Randolph Champaign IL 61820 217-398-2376 B

IL Chicago's New East Side Artworks 70,000 Aug. 857 West Webster Ave Chicago IL 60614 (773) 404-0763 B

IL One Of A Kind Show And Sale 25,000 Dec. Merchandise Mart, Ste 470 Chicago IL 60654 312-527-7642 nr

IL North Halstead Market Days 200,000 September 1960 N. Clybourn, R Bldg. Chicago IL 60614 773-868-3010 A-

IL Brookfest Summer Festival 20,000 July 1960 N. Clybourn, R Bldg. Chicago IL 60614 773-868-3010 B

IL Old Town Art Fair 40,000 June 1763 North Park Ave Chicago IL 60614 (312) 337-1938 A+

IL 57th Street Art Fair 100,000 June 1763 North Park Ave Chicago IL 60614 312-337-1938 A+

IL Wells Street Art  Festival 50,000 June 1545 N. Wells St. Chicago IL 60610 (312) 951-6106 B+

IL American Craft Exposition 13,000 Aug. Henry Crown Sports Pavilion Evanston IL 60201 (708) 570-5099 A+

IL Evanston Lakeshore Arts Festival 20,000 Aug. 927 Noyes Evanston IL 60201 (847) 448-8260 B

IL Evanston Ethnic Arts Festival 20,000 July 927 Noyes Street Evanston IL 60201 847-448-8260 B

IL Fountain Square Arts Festival 20,000 June 1560 Sherman Ave. #860 Evanston IL 60201 (708) 328-1500 B+

IL Midwest Salute To The Masters 40,000 Aug. P. O. Box 2032 Fairview Heights IL 62208 (618) 394-0022 B

IL Frankfort Fall Festival 200,000 Sept. 123 Kansas Street Frankfort IL 60423 815-469-3356 B+

IL Galena Arts Festival 6,000 July P. O. Box 23 Galena IL 61036 (815) 777-9341 B

IL Acc Craft Fair 8,000 April 21 South Eltings Corner Rd Highland NY 12528 800-836-3470 B+

IL Hinsdale Fine Arts Festival 5,000 June 22 E First St Hinsdale IL 60521 (708) 323-3952 B

IL Lagrange West End Art Festival 30,000 September 106 Calendar Ave. Lgba Lagrange  IL 60525 630-536-8416 B

IL Deer Path Art League Fall Festival 200,000 September 1 Market Square Court Lake Forest IL 60045 847-234-3743 B+

IL Lexington Taste Of Country Festival 11,000 September 205 North Center Street Lexington  IL 61753 309-365-7200 B-

IL Gold Coast Art Fair 750,000 Aug. 90 Oakwood St Ste 101 Lincolnshire IL 60069 847-444-9600 B+

IL Port Clinton Art Festival 275,000 Aug. 90 Oakwood, Ste 101 Lincolnshire IL 60069 847-444-9600 A+

IL Cedarhurst Craft Fair 20,000 Sept. P. O. Box 923 / Richview Rd Mt Vernon IL 62864 (618) 242-1236 B

IL Naperville Sizzlin Summer 75,000 July 1310 Frederick Lane Naperville IL 60565 630-355-1708 nr

IL Eyes To The Sky Craft Show 250,000 July 1310 Frederick Lane Naperville IL 60565 630-355-1708 B+

IL Riverwalk Art Fair 20,000 Sept. 508 N Center Naperville IL 60563 (708) 355-2530 B

IL Invitational Crafts Exhibit 100,000 July P O Box 1350 Oak Brook IL 60522 (630) 573-0700 A+

IL Palatine Street Fest And Art Show 35,000 August 200 E. Wood Street Palatine IL 60067 847-359-9050 nr

IL Water Tower Arts & Craft Festival 25,000 June P. O. Box 1326 Palatine, IL 60078 (312) 751-2500 B

IL Park Forest Art Fair 15,000 Sept. Box 776 Park Forest IL 60466 (708) 748-5016 B+

IL Fine Art Fair 40,000 Sept. 203 Harrison Peoria IL 61602 (309) 637-2787 B

IL Greenwich Village Art Fair 15,000 Sept. 711 N. Main St. Rockford IL 61103 (815) 968-2787 A

IL Holiday Folk Craft And Art 25,000 Nov. P. O. Box 228 Rockton IL 61072 815-629-2060 A

IL Autumn On The Fox Art And Craft Show 75,000 October 43w987 Empire Road Saint Charles IL 60175 630-365-2753 B+

IL Springfield Old Capitol Art Fair 25,000 May 1508 Daylilly Pl Springfield IL 62707 (217) 585-8000 B

IL Midwest Craft Festival 40,000 May 620 Lincoln Avenue Winnetka IL 60093 847-446-2870 A+

IL Old Orchard Craft Festival 100,000 May 620 Lincoln Winnetka IL 60093 (708) 446-2870 A+

IL  Spring Festival+B405 Arts & Crafts Affair 16,000 April Box 184 Boys Town NE 68010 402-331-2889 B+

IN 4th St. Festival Of The Arts & Crafts 25,000 Aug. P O Box 1257 Bloomington IN 47402 (812) 334-4447 A-

IN Chesterton Arts & Crafts Fair 10,000 Aug. P. O. Box 783 Chesterton IN 46304 (219) 926-4711 A-

IN Chautauqua Of The Arts 25,000 Sept. P. O. Box 2624 Columbus IN 47202 (812) 265-5080 B

IN Talbot Street Art Fair 60,000 June P. O. Box 44166 Danville IN 46244 317-745-6479 B

IN Talbot Street Art Fair 60,000 June Box 489 Danville, IN 46122 (317) 887-9853 B

IN Leeper Park Art Fair 10,000 June 16200 Continental Drive Granger IN 46530 (574) 272-8598 A-

IN Broad Ripple Art Fair 20,000 May 820 E 67th St. Indianapolis IN 46220 (317) 255-2464 B

IN The Penrod Arts Fair 35,000 Sept. P. O. Box 40817 Indianapolis IN 46240 (317) 252-9895 B+

IN Round The Fountain Art Fair 5,000 May P O Box 1134 Lafayette IN 47902 (317) 477-4230 B

IN Chautauqua Festival Of Art 75,000 Sept. 601 West First Street Madison IN 47250 812-265-6100 B

IN Amish Acres Arts And Crafts Fest 80,000 Aug. 1600 W. Market Street Nappanee IN 46550 (574) 773-4188 A+

IN Covered Bridge Festival 750,000 Oct. 7975 E. Chandler Avenue Terre Haute IN 47803 812-877-9550 A-

IN Covered Bridge Festival 1,000,000 October 7975 E. Chandler Ave. Terre Haute IN 47803 812-877-9550 A-

KS River Valley Arts 8,000 June P O Box 147 Arkansas City KS 67005 (620) 442-5895 B+

KS Arts And Crafts Fair 40,000 Sept. 109 South Main Hillsboro KS 67063 620-947-3506 A-

KS Hutchinson Art Association Art Fair 10,000 April 405 N. Washington  Hutchinson KS 67501 620-663-2461 nr

KS Overland Park Arts And Crafts Fair 15,000 September 6300 West 87th Street Overland Park KS 66212 913-895-6357 B

KS Smoky Hill River Festival 100,000 June P. O. Box 2181 Salina KS 67402 (913) 823-1900 B

KS Christmas In July 10,000 July Box 12707 Wichita KS 67212 316-773-9300 B

KS Wichita Art And Book Fair 40,000 May P. O. Box 20885 Wichita KS 67208 316-683-3144 B

KS Pioneer Christmas Arts And Crafts 12,000 November P. O. Box 9024 Wichita KS 67277 316-729-9443 B

KY Bardstown Arts, Crafts, And Antiques 12,000 October P. O. Box 867 Bardstown KY 40004 502-348-4877 B

KY Berea Craft Festival 11,000 July P. O. Box 128 Berea KY 40403 859-986-2818 B+

KY Holiday Fine Art And Craft Fair 8,000 Nov. P. O. Box 21882 Columbus OH 43221 614-486-3537 B

KY Cincinnati Winterfair 13,000 November 1665 West Fifth Avenue Columbus KY 43212 614-486-7119 B

KY Newport Arts And Music Festival 20,000 July 915 Lincoln Road Dayton KY 41074 859-441-3139 B

KY St. James Ct. Art Fair - 1300 3rd St. 900,000 Oct. 1362 S 3rd St Louisville KY 40208 (502) 635-2844 B+

KY St. James Ct Art Show/S. 4th Street 300,000 Oct. P. O. Box 186 Louisville KY 40201 502-634-8587 A+

KY Cherokee Triangle Art Fair 25,000 April P. O. Box 4306 Louisville KY 40204 502-458-3905 B

KY St. James Court Art Show 300,000 Oct. P. O. Box 3804 Louisville KY 40201 (502) 635-1842 A

KY St. James Ct. Art Fair/Belgravia Sect. 300,000 Oct. 511 Belgravia Ct. Louisville KY 40201 (502) 634-8950 A

KY Louisville Christmas Show 13,000 Nov. P. O. Box 66 Madison IN 47250 812-265-6100 A

LA Covington Three Rivers Art Festival 35,000 November P. O. Box 633 Covington LA 70434 985-705-7968 B

LA Christmas In New Orleans 17,000 Nov. 16471 Highway 40 Folsom LA 70437 504-796-5853 A

LA Cottontails Trail Arts And Crafts Show 10,000 April 16741 Highway 40 Folsom LA 70437 985-796-5853 nr

LA Kenner Christmas In July A And C 15,000 July 16741 Highway 40 Folsom LA 70437 985-796-5853 B

LA Christmas Extravaganza 25,000 December 16741 Highway 40 Folsom LA 70437 985-796-5853 B+

LA New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Fest 500,000 April 1205 North Rampart St. New Orleans LA 70116 (504) 522-4786 A-

LA Red River Revel Arts Festival 200,000 Sept. 101 Milam Shrevep. O.Rt LA 71101 (318) 424-4000 B

MA Apple Harvest And Crafts Festival 10,000 October Umass Commuter Svcs. Amherst MA 01003 413-545-4466 nr

MA Christmas Festival 37,000 Nov. 83 Mt. Vernon Street Boston MA 02108 617-742-3973 A

MA Crafts At The Castle 10,000 Dec. 34 1/2 Beacon St. Boston MA 02108 (617) 523-6400 A

MA Cranberry Professional A And C+B501 30,000 Nov. 220 Rte 6h Brewster MA 02631 508-385-8689 B+

MA Festival Of The Arts 10,000 Aug. 154 Crowell Rd Chatham MA 02633 (508) 945-3583 B

MA Old Deerfield Christmas Sampler 17,000 Nov. P. O. Box 323 Deerfield MA 1342 413-774-7476 A-

MA Danforth Craft Festival 5,000 June 123 Union Ave. Framingham MA 01701 (508) 620-0050 A+

MA The Berkshire Crafts Fair 5,000 Aug. Monument Mt. Reg. H.S/Rt. 7 Gt Barrington MA 01230 (413) 528-3346 B+

MA Gloucester Waterfront Fest. 25,000 Aug. 4 Greenleaf Woods Dr, #302 Portsmouth NH 03801 (207) 439-2021 B+

MA Original Castleberry 25,000 November 38 Charles Street Rochester NH 03867 603-332-2616 B

MD Fell's Point Fun Festival 700,000 October 812 South Ann Street Baltimore MD 21231 410-675-6756 A-

MD Fells Point Art & Craft Show 6,000 Aug. 1606 Portugul St. Baltimore MD 21231 (410) 563-2606 B

MD Fell's PoInt Fun Festival 700,000 Oct. 812 South Ann Street Baltimore  MD 21231 410-675-6750 A-

MD Artscape 750,000 July 7 E. Redwood St.  Ste 500 Baltimore  MD 21202 410-752-8632 B

MD Bel Air Festival For The Arts 30,000 September 1909 Wheel Road Bel Air MD 21015 410-836-2395 B

MD National Craft Fair 25,000 Oct. 4845 Rumler Rd Chambersburg PA 17201 (717) 369-4810 A

MD Waterfowl Festival 15,000 November P. O. Box 929 Easton MD 21601 410-822-4567 B

MD Frederick Festival Of The Arts 25,000 June P O Box 3080 Frederick MD 21705 (301) 694-9632 B

MD Sugarloaf Crafts Festival 24,000 April 200 Orchard Ridge Dr.#215 Gaithersburg MD 20878 800-210-9900 B

MD Christmas Wonderland 20,000 November P. O. Box 1921 Hagerstown MD 21742 301-791-2346 B

MD Havre De Grace Arts And Crafts Show 10,000 August P. O. Box 150 Havre De Grace MD 21078 410-939-9342 B

MD Acc Craft Fair 35,000 March 21 S Eltings Corner Rd Highland NY 12528 (800) 836-3470 A+

MD Shaker Forest Festival 37,000 Sept. 275 Pleasantview Drive Midland PA 15059 724-643-6627 B

MD North Beach Bayfest 18,000 August P. O. Box 99 North Beach MD 20714 301-855-6681 B

MD Ocean City Holiday Shoppers Fair 15,000 November 4001 Coastal Highway Ocean City MD 21842 410-289-8311 B

MD Christmas Craft Expo. 10,000 November 10549 Sussex Rd. Ocean City MD 21842 410-524-9177 B

MD Sunfest 200,000 Sept. 200 125th Street Ocean City MD 21842 (410) 250-0125 A

MD Catoctin Colorfest 100,000 October P. O. Box 33 Thurmont MD 21788 301-271-4432 B+

MD Kennedy Krieger Festival Of Trees 25,000 November 200 E. Joppa Road #403 Towson MD 21204 410-769-8223 B

MD Towsontown Spring Festival 250,000 May P O Box 10115 Towson MD 21285 (410) 825-1144 B

MD Brandywine Lions Craft Fair Festival 20,000 October 13200 Old Marlboro Pike Upper Marlboro MD 20772 301-627-7575 B

MD Maryland Christmas Show 40,000 Nov. P. O. Box 187 Walkersville MD 21793 (301) 898-5466 B+

MD Cabin Fever Festival  Feb. P. O. Box 187 Walkersville MD 21793 301-898-5466 B

MD Ocean City Labor Day A And C Fest. 15,000 September 9005 Whaleyville Road Whaleyville MD 21872 410-524-9177 B

MD  Sugarloaf Crafts Festival 26,000 Oct. 200 Orchard Ridge Dr. #215 Gaithersburg MD 20878 800-210-9900 A

ME Bath Heritage Days 50,000 July 60 Pleasant PoInt Road Topsham ME 04086 207-373-1325 B

MI Algonac Rotary Art Fair 30,000 September P. O. Box 1959 Algonac MI 48001 810-794-5937 B

MI Allen Park Arts And Crafts 50,000 Aug. 16850 Southfield Road Allen Park MI 48101 313-928-1400 A

MI South Univ. Art Fair 100,000 July P. O. Box 4525 Ann Arbor MI 48106 734-663-5300 A

MI Southfield City Art Fair 30,000 August 118 N. Fourth Ave Ann Arbor MI 48104 734-662-3382 B

MI The Ann Arbor Street Art Fair 500,000 July P O Box 1352 Ann Arbor MI 48106 (734) 994-5260 A+

MI State Street Area Art Fair 500,000 July P. O. Box 4128 Ann Arbor MI 48106 (313) 663-6511 A+

MI The Summer Art Fair 500,000 July 118 N. Fourth Ave. Ann Arbor MI 48104 (313) 662-3382 A+

MI Birmingham Art Fair (At Shain Park) 80,000 May 1516 S. Cranbrook Rd. Birmingham, MI 48009 (248) 644-0866 B+

MI Summit Place Mall Christmas Show 80,000 December 40750 Woodward Ave, 32 Bloomfield Hills MI 48304 248-302-1610 B

MI Brighton Art Festival 20,000 August 131 Hyne Street Brighton MI 48116 810-227-5086 B

MI Cadillac Festival Of The Arts 25,000 July P. O. Box 841 Cadillac MI 49601 231-775-7853 B

MI Charlevoix Waterfront Art  30,000 Aug. Box 57 Charlevoix MI 49720 (616) 547-5759 B

MI Clarkston Art In The Village 15,000 September P. O. Box 261 Clarkston MI 48347 248-922-0270 B

MI Clinton Fall Festival 60,000 September P. O. Box 205 Clinton MI 49236 517-456-7396 B

MI Art On The Avenue 15,000 June 15801 Michigan Ave 4th F Dearborn MI 48126 313-943-3095 B

MI Detroit Festival Of The Arts 250,000 Sept. 4735 Cass St Detroit MI 48202 (313) 577-5088 B+

MI East Lansing Art Festival 50,000 May 410 Abbott Rd East Lansing MI 48823 (517) 319-6804 B

MI Msu Crafts Fair 60,000 May 322 Msu Student Union East Lansing MI 48824 517-355-3354 B

MI MSU Holiday Arts And Crafts Show 15,000 December 322 Msu Union East Lansing MI 48824 517-355-3354 B

MI Shipshewana On The Road/Battle Cr. 10,000 November 10740 Three Mile Road East Leroy MI 49051 269-979-8888 B

MI Farmington Founders Festival 65,000 July P. O. Box 291 Farmington MI 48332 248-932-3378 B

MI Flint Art Fair 20,000 June 1120 E Kearsley St. Flint MI 48503 (810) 234-1695 A

MI Americana Folk Art Show 100,000 September 613 S. Main Street Frankenmuth MI 48734 989-652-9701 B

MI Festival Of The Arts 500,000 June P. O. Box 2265 Grand Rapids MI 49503 616-459-2787 B+

MI Reeds Lake Arts Festival 10,000 June P O Box 1287 Grand Rapids MI 49503 (616) 458-0315 B+

MI Hasting Summerfest Arts And Crafts 20,000 August 221 West State Street Hastings MI 49058  nr

MI Holland Art In The Park 12,000 August 150 West 8th Street Holland MI 49423 616-395-3278 B-

MI Jackson Civil War Muster Craft Show 25,000 August 3117 Earl Drive Jackson MI 49283 517-206-8489 B-

MI Hot Air Jubilee Arts And Crafts Show 60,000 July 3606 Wildwood Avenue Jackson MI 49204 517-782-1515 B

MI Christmas At Wings 60,000 December P. O. Box 516 Kalamazoo MI 49004 269-349-1185 B+

MI Kia/Bronson Park Art Fair 50,000 June 314 S. Park Kalamazoo MI 49007 (616) 349-7775 B+

MI Lake Odessa Art In The Park 10,000 July 839 Fourth Avenue Lake Odessa MI 48849 616-374-4325 B-

MI Lexington's Fine Art And Craft Street 20,000 August 7276 Huron Avenue Lexington  MI 48450 810-359-5151 B

MI Art On The Rocks 12,000 July P. O. Box 9 Marquette MI 49855 (906) 942-7865 B

MI Cornwell's Sept. Arts And Crafts Show 22,000 September 18935 15 1/2 Mile Road Marshall MI 49068 239-781-4293 B

MI Milford Memories Summer Festival 100,000 August 317 Union Street Milford MI 48381 248-685-7129 B+

MI New Boston Applefest 100,000 October P. O. Box 58 New Boston MI 48164 734-783-5524 B+

MI Petoskey Art In The Park 20,000 July 401 E. Mitchell St. Petoskey MI 49770 (616) 347-4150 B

MI Art In The Park 75,000 July 51220 Northview Plymouth MI 48170 734-454-1314 B

MI Birmingham Art In The Park 60,000 Sept. 7 South Perry St Pontiac MI 48342 (810) 456-8150 A-

MI Chrysler Arts, Beats And Eats 800,000 Sept 30 North Saginaw Ste 400 Pontiac MI 48342  A

MI Art & Apples Festival 150,000 Sept. 407 Pine St. Rochester MI 48307 (810) 651-7418 A+

MI Roscommon Arts And Crafts Show 15,000 July P. O. Box 486 Roscommmon MI 48653 989-275-8760 B-

MI Royal Oak Outdoor Art Fair 30,000 July P. O. Box 64 Royal Oak, MI 48068 (810) 585-4736 A+

MI Saint Joseph Venetian Festival 120,000 July P. O. Box 510 Saint Joseph MI 49085 269-983-7917 B

MI South Haven Art Fair 10,000 July P. O. Box 505 South Haven MI 49090 (616) 637-1041 B

MI South Haven Summer Art Fair 20,000 July P. O. Box 505 South Haven MI 49090 269-637-1041 B

MI St Clair Art Fair 60,000 June 201 Riverside St. Clair MI 48079 (810) 329-9576 B

MI Krasl Art Fair On The Bluff 75,000 July 707 Lake Blvd. St. Joseph MI 49085 (616) 983-0271 A+

MI Traverse Bay Fair 9,000 July 720 S. Elmwood Traverse City MI 49684 (517) 268-5656 B

MI Saint Nick's Warehouse 11,000 November P. O. Box 180359 Utica MI 48318 586-566-1353 B

MI West Branch Victorian Art Fair 20,000 August 124 N. 4th Street West Branch MI 48661 989-345-3856 B-

MI Westland Summer Festival 225,000 July 7910 Nankin Mill Street Westland  MI 48185 734-261-5955 B

MI Wyandotte Heritage Days 40,000 September 2630 Biddle Avenue Wyandotte MI 48192 734-324-7297 B

MI Wyandotte Street Art Fair 250,000 July 3131 Biddle Avenue Wyandotte MI 48192 734-324-4506 B+

MI Clay And Glass Show 28,000 June 268 Taft Ypsilanti MI 48197 734-216-3958 B+

MI  Art In The Park 230,000 July 587 West Western Muskegon MI 49440 231-722-6520 B

MN Old Fashioned 4th Of July Fine Arts 30,000 July P. O. Box 805 Blooming Prarie MN 55917 507-583-4472 B-

MN Autumn Festival, An Arts & Crafts Affair 350,000 Nov. Box 184 Boys Town NE 68010 402-331-2889 A+

MN Spring Festival An Arts & Crafts Affair 12,000 April Box 184 Boys Town  NE 68010 402-331-2889 B

MN Edina Art Fair 35,000 June P. O. Box 24122 Edina, MN 55424 (612) 922-1524 A-

MN Little Falls Sidewalk Arts And Crafts 65,000 Sept. 200 Nw 1st Street Little Falls MN 56345 320-630-5155 A

MN Little Falls Indoor Show 10,000 September 73 East Broadway Little Falls MN 56345 218-330-6141 nr

MN Maple Grove Days Art Fair 30,000 July P. O. Box 2009 Maple Grove MN 55311 612-494-5984 B

MN Marine Art Fair 20,000 Sept. 1313 Broadway Marine/ St Croi MN 55047 (612) 433-3636 B+

MN Powderhorn Festival 60,000 Aug. P. O. Box 7372 Minneapolis MN 55047 612-724-8179 A-

MN Metris Uptown Art Fair 300,000 Aug. 1406 W. Lake St Ste 2002 Minneapolis MN 55408 (612) 823-4581 A+

MN Minnesota Crafts Festival 15,000 June 528 Hennepin Ave. Ste 216 Minneapolis MN 55403 (612) 333-7789 A

MN Red Wing Fall Festival Of Arts 10,000 October 418 Levee Street Red Wing MN 55066 651-388-7569 nr

MN River City Days 25,000 August 439 Main Street Red Wing MN 55066 651-388-4719 B

MN Old Creamery Arts And Crafts Show 15,000 September 40 S. Main St. E Box 176 Rice MN 56367 320-393-4100 B

MN Highland Fest 65,000 August 790 Cleveland Ave S. #219 Saint Paul MN 55116 651-699-9042 B

MN Art At Ramsey Junior High School 30,000 December 1015 South Snelling Saint Paul MN 55116 651-222-2483 B

MN Minnesota Renaissance Festival 312,000 Aug. 3525 West 145 Th Street Shakopee MN 55379 612-445-7361 A

MO Autumn Daze Craft Show 800,000 Sept. P. O. Box 1034 Branson MO 65615 417-334-1548 A-

MO Plumb Nellie Festival And Craft Show 800,000 May P. O. Box 1034 Branson MO 65615 417-334-1548 A

MO Christmas Arts And Crafts Extrav. 10,000 November P. O. Box 901 Cape Girardeau MO 63702 573-334-9233 B

MO Box 1077 250,000 Aug. 210 W. Truman Rd. Independence MO 64051 (816) 252-4745 A-

MO Plaza  Arts Fair 270,000 Sept. 310 Ward Parkway Kansas City MO 64112 (816) 753-0100 A+

MO Brookside Art Annual 50,000 May 3920 W. 69th Terrace Prarie Village KS 66208 (913) 362-9668 A+

MO Festival Of The Little Hills 250,000 August P. O. Box 1323 Saint Charles MO 63302 636-940-0095 B+

MO Central West End Art Fair And Taste 50,000 June 304-A North Euclud Ave. Saint Louis MO 63108 314-361-2850 B

MO Festival Of The Little Hills 300,000 Aug. P. O. Box 7 St Charles MO 63302 636-940-0095 B+

MO Saint Louis Art Fair 100,000 Sept. 7818 Forsyth Ste 210 St Louis MO 63105 (314) 863-0278 A+

MO Historic Shaw Art Fair 15,000 Oct. 2211 S. 39th St. St Louis MO 63110 (314) 771-3101 B

MO Laumeier Cont. Arts & Crafts Fair 20,000 May 12580 Rott St. Louis MO 63127 (314) 821-1209 A

MO Washington Art Fair And Winefest 30,000 May P. O. Box 144 Washington MO 63090 636-583-3270 B-

MS Mississippi Fine Arts And Crafts Fest. 20,000 October P. O. Box 347  Ardmore PA 19003 877-244-9768 B

MS Flea Market Arts & Crafts Show 30,000 Oct. P. O. Box 382 Canton MS 39046 (601) 859-8055 B+

MS Meridian Arts In The Park Festival 17,000 April P. O. Box 1405 Meridian MS 39302 601-693-2787 B

MS Peter Anderson Festival 50,000 November 1000 Washington Ave. Ocean Springs MS 39564 228-875-4424 B+

MS Oxford Double Decker Arts Festival 50,000 April 107 Courthouse Sq. Ste 1 Oxford MS 38655 800-758-9177 B

MS Picayune Fall Street Fair 55,000 November P. O. Box 1656 Picayune MS 39466 601-799-3070 B

MT Art In Washoe Park 12,000 July 401 East Commercial Anaconda MT 59711 406-563-2422 nr

MT Bigfork Festival Of The Arts 14,000 August P. O. Box 1892 Bigfork MT 59911 406-881-4636 B

MT Summerfair 20,000 July 401 N. 27th St. Billings MT 59101 (406) 245-8688 A

MT Billings Strawberry Festival 15,000 June 2906 Third Avenue North Billings MT 59101 406-259-5454 B

MT Arts In The Park 10,000 July P. O. Box 83 Kalispell MT 59901 (406) 755-5268 B

MT Kalispell Arts In The Park 11,000 July 302 Second Avenue East Kalispell MT 59901 406-755-5268 nr

MT Huckleberry Days A And C Fair 10,000 August P. O. Box 1120 Whitefish MT 59937 406-862-3501 nr

NC Bele Chere 350,000 July P. O. Box 7148 Asheville NC 28802 828-259-5821 A

NC Village Art And Craft Fair 20,000 Aug. 7 Boston Way Asheville NC 28803 828-274-2831 B

NC Sourwood Festival 30,000 August 201 East State Street Black Mountain NC 28711 828-669-2300 B

NC Fine Arts And Crafts Showcase 15,000 July P. O. Box 1229 Brevard NC 28712 828-884-2787 B

NC Mountain Heritage Day 35,000 Sept. Wcu Cullowhee NC 28723 (828) 227-2169 A-

NC Cityfest Live 110,000 April 518 North Hwy 16 Denver NC 28037 (704) 483-6266 A+

NC Centerfest 20,000 October 120 Morris Street Durham NC 27701 919-560-2722 B

NC Holly Day Fair 20,000 November 2605 Fort Bragg Road Fayetteville NC 28303 910-323-5509 B

NC Craftsmens Christmas Classic 35,000 Nov. 1240 Oakland Ave Greensboro NC 27403 336-274-5550 A-

NC Craftsmen's Classic 20,000 April 1240 Oakland Ave Greensboro NC 27403 336-274-1084 B

NC A Christmas Carousel Hol. Fest 15,000 November P. O. Box 7282 Greensboro NC 24717 336-855-0208 B+

NC Craftscene And Marketplace Fun 4th 100,000 July P. O. Box 29212 Greensboro NC 27429 336-274-4595 B

NC Seaboard Festival Day 25,000 October P. O. Box 132 Hamlet NC 28345 910-582-3505 B

NC North Carolina Apple Festival 100,000 September P. O. Box 886 Henderson NC 28793 828-891-3939 B+

NC Hickory Octoberfest 95,000 October P. O. Box 9086 Hickory NC 28603 828-322-3125 B+

NC Mountain Makings 10,000 July   Box 1776 Highlands NC 28741 828-526-3181 nr

NC Matthews Alive! 125,000 September 716 Meadow Lake Drive Matthews NC 28106 704-668-9681 B+

NC Carolina Designer Craftsmen Fair 10,000 Nov. P. O. Box 33791 Raleigh NC 27636 (919) 571-4217 B

NC Fourth Of July Festival 40,000 July 4841 Long Beach Road Se Southport NC 28461 910-457-6964 B

NC Church Street Art And Craft Show 20,000 October P. O. Box 1409 Waynesville NC 28786 828-456-3517 B

NC Ashe County Christmas In July 33,000 July P. O. Box 1107 West Jefferson NC 28694 336-246-5855 B

NC Merlefest 800,000 April P.O. Box 120 Wilkelsboro NC 28697 336-838-6292 B+

NC Azalea Festival 375,000 April P. O. Box 3275 Wilmington NC 28406 910-790-9564 B+

NC Piedmont Crafts Fair  Nov. 1204 Reynolsd Avenue Winston-Salem NC 27104 336-72651516 B+

ND Island Park Show 15,000 August 701 Main Aven Fargo ND 58103 701-476-6771 B

ND Downtown Red River Street Fair 75,000 July 203 4th Ave North Fargo ND 58107 (701) 241-1570 B+

NE Autumn Fest+B645, An Arts & Crafts Affair 30,000 Nov. Box 184 Boys Town NE 68010 402-331-2889 A

NE Art In The Park 16,000 July Box 1368 Kearney NE 68848 (308) 234-2662 B

NE Omaha Summer Arts Festival 80,000 June P. O. Box 31036 Omaha NE 68131 (402) 963-9020 A

NE Countryside Village Art Fair 15,000 June 2336 S 138th Omaha NE 68144 (402) 333-9629 A-

NE Rockbrook Village Art Fair 30,000 Sept. 2800 S. 110 Court Ste 1 Omaha NE 68144 (402) 390-0890 B

NH Craftsmen's Fair 50,000 Aug. 205 North Main St. Concord NH 03301 603-224-3375 A+

NH Lincoln Fall Craft Festival 35,000 October 38 Charles Street Rochester NH 03867 603-332-2616 B+

NH Mills Falls Autumn Craft Festival 10,000 October 38 Charles Street Rochester NH 03867 603-332-2616 B

NH New England Craft And Food Fair 22,000 November 38 Charles Street Rochester NH 03867 603-332-2616 B

NH Christmas Craft Show 9,000 December 38 Charles Street Rochester NH 03867 603-332-2616 B

NJ Atlantic City Arts Alive 140,000 August 47 N. Tallahassee Ave Atlantic City NJ 08401 609-345-0899 A

NJ Bordentown Cranberry Fest 40,000 October P. O. Box 686 Bordentown NJ 08505 609-499-4410 B

NJ Chester Fall Craft Show 12,000 September P. O. Box 330 Chester NJ 07930 973-377-3260 B

NJ Montclair Craft Show 5,000 Dec. P. O. Box 8252 Glen Ridge NJ 7028 (973) 743-4110 A+

NJ Haddenfield Art And Craft Show 130,000 July 114 Kings Hiway E Haddonfield  NJ 08033 856-216-7253 B

NJ Fine Art And Crafts Show 16,000 Oct. 12 Galaxy Court Hillsborough NJ 08844 908-874-5247 B

NJ Country Folk Art Craft Show 25,000 Oct. 15045 Dixie Highway Holly MI 48442 248-634-4151 B

NJ Peters Valley Craft Fair 10,000 Sept. 19 Kuhn Rd Layton NJ 07851 (973) 948-5200 B

NJ Spring Chester Craft Show 12,000 June P. O. Box 613 Madison NJ 07940 973-377-3260 B

NJ Flemington Crafts Festival 30,000 April Box 326 Masonville NY 13804 607-265-3230 B

NJ Flemington Crafts Festival 30,000 October P. O. Box 326 Masonville NY 13804 607-265-3230 B+

NJ Little Falls Street Fair 15,000 September 5 Jeanette Lane Milford NJ 08848 908-996-3866 B

NJ Maywood Street Fair 10,000 May 5 Jeanette Lane Milford NJ 08848 908-996-3866 nr

NJ Morristown Craft Market 5,000 Oct. P. O. Box 2305 Morristown NJ 07062 (201) 263-8332 A+

NJ Nutley Festival In The Park 15,000 September 51 Enclosure Nutley NJ 07110 973-667-3013 nr

NJ Westfield Craft Market 10,000 Nov. P. O. Box 480 Slate Hill NY 10973 (914) 355-2400 A

NJ Art And Craft Show 30,000 Aug. P. O. Box 274 Stone Harbor NJ 08247 609-368-4112 A-

NJ Midsummer Craft Show 10,000 July 6101 Pacific Avenue Wildwood Crest NJ 08260 609-522-1669 nr

NM New Mexico Arts And Crafts Fair 15,000 June 5500 San Mateo N. E. #106 Albuquerque NM 87109 505-884-9043 B+

NM Int. Balloon Fiesta 850,000 October 4401 Alameda N. E. Albuquerque NM 87113 505-821-1000 B

NM Wine Festival At Bernallo 18,000 September P. O. Box 57060 Albuquerque NM 87187 505-867-3311 B

NM Southwest Arts Festival 30,000 Nov. 525 San Pedro NE., #107 Albuquerque NM 87108 (505) 262-2448 A

NM Weems Artfest 50,000 Nov. 2801-M Eubank Ne Albuquerque NM 87112 (505) 293-6133 A

NM Cloudcroft Oct.Fest 3,000 July P O Box 1290 Cloudcroft NM 88317 (505) 682-2733 B

NM Farmington Riverfest Fine Arts Fair 13,000 May 901 Fairgrounds Rd. Farmington NM 87401 505-599-1140 B

NM Santa Fe Fiesta Arts & Crafts Fair 30,000 Sept. P. O. Box 22303 Santa Fe NM 87502 (505) 988-2889 B

NM Girls, Inc. Arts And Crafts Show 35,000 August 301 Hillside Avenue Santa Fe NM 87501 505-982-2042 B+

NV Las Vegas Fine Art And Craft Fest 25,000 October P. O. Box 347 Ardmore PA 19003 610-896-9839 B+

NV Art In The Park 100,000 Oct. P O Box 61512 Boulder City NV 89006 (702) 294-1611 B+

NV Candy Dance Arts & Crafts Festival 80,000 Sept. P O Box 155 Genoa NV 89411 (702) 782-3696 B+

NV Reno Street Vibrations 40,000 September 4790 Caughlin Parkway 507 Reno NV 89509 775-324-6435 B

NV Best In The West Cook-Off 350,000 September 4790 Caughlin Parkway 507 Reno NV 89509 775-324-6435 A-

NV The Big Easy 45,000 July 814 Victorian Avenue Sparks NV 89432 775-353-1513 B+

NY Armonk Outdoor Art Show 14,000 Oct. One Boulder Trail Armonk, NY 10504 (914) 273-5986 B

NY Eagle Mills Arts And Crafts Show 30,000 September P. O. Box 788 Broadalbin NY 12025 518-883-5479 B+

NY Elmwood Ave. Fest. Of The Arts 100,000 August P. O. Box 786 Buffalo NY 14213 716-830-2484 B+

NY Adirondack Mountain Craft Fair 12,000 Sept. P. O. Box 300 Charlotte VT 05445 802-425-3399 A-

NY International Festival A And C Show 18,000 September 166 Little Robin Hood Darien NY 14228 716-689-1100 nr

NY Albany Holiday A And C Showcase 14,000 December P. O. Box 404 Delmar NY 12054 518-439-8379 B

NY Ellicottville Fall Festival 40,000 October P. O. Box 456 Ellicottville NY 14731 716-699-5046 B

NY Fairport Canal Days 200,000 July 6 N. Main Street Fairport NY 14450 585-234-4323 A

NY Larac June Arts Festival 20,000 June 7 Lapham Place Glens Falls NY 12801 518-798-1144 B+

NY Elms Christmas Craft Show 18,000 November 341 Spier Falls Road Greenfield Center NY 12833 518-893-7488 B

NY Haverstraw Street Festival 20,000 September P. O. Box 159 Haverstraw NY 10927 845-947-5646 B

NY Hilton Apple Fest 65,000 October P. O. Box 1 Hilton NY 14468 585-234-3378 B+

NY Lafayette Apple Festival 75,000 October P. O. Box 456 Lafayette NY 13084 315-677-3644 B+

NY 100 American Craftsmen 15,000 May 433 Locust St Lockport NY 14094 (716) 433-2617 B+

NY Long Beach A And C Festival 100,000 July Mag. Blvd And W. Bay Dr. Long Beach NY 11561 516-431-3890 B+

NY Maple Festival 40,000 April 2861 Clarks Corners Road Marathon NY 13803 607-849-3518 B

NY Holiday Art And Craft Spectacular 20,000 Dec. Box 326 Masonville NY 13804 607-265-3230 B

NY Holiday Art And Craft Spectacular 16,000 December P. O. Box 326 Masonville NY 13804 607-265-3230 B

NY Craft Festivals 5,000 July P O Box 89 Mayville NY 14757 (716) 753-0240 B

NY Amer. Crafts Fest. / Lincoln Center 100,000 June P. O. Box 650 Montclair NJ 07042 (973) 746-0091 A+

NY Naples Grape Festival 100,000 September P. O. Box 70 Naples NY 14512 585-374-2240 A-

NY Autumn Crafts On Columbus 50,000 Oct. 461 Central Park West #1 New York NY 10025 (212) 866-2239 A-

NY Washington Sq Outdoor Art Exhibit 200,000 Aug. 115 E 9th St. #7c New York NY 10003 (212) 982-6255 B

NY Quaker Arts Fest 90,000 Sept. P. O. Box 202 Orchard Park NY 14127 716-655-4147 A

NY Letchworth A And C Show And Sale 100,000 October P. O. Box 249 Perry NY 14530 585-237-3517 A-

NY Waterfront Art Festival 15,000 July 50 State Street Pittsford NY 14534 585-383-1472 B

NY Remsen Barn Festival Of The Arts 75,000 Sept. P. O. Box 218 Remsen NY 13438 (315) 831-4257 B+

NY Crafts At Rhinebeck 15,000 Oct. P. O. Box 389 Rhinebeck NY 12572 (914) 876-4001 B

NY Park Avenue Arts Festival 25,000 May 171 Reservoir Ave Rochester NY 14620 (585) 256-4960 B

NY Clothesline Festival  Sept. 500 University Avenue Rochester NY 14607 585-473-7720 B

NY Corn Hill Arts Fest. 250,000 July 133 S. Fitzhugh Rochester NY 14608 (585) 262-3142 A-

NY Masapequa Park Street Fair 50,000 August P. O. Box 477 Smithtown NY 11787 631-724-5966 B

NY West Hempstead Street Fair 20,000 October P. O. Box 477 Smithtown NY 11787 631-724-5966 B

NY Market Street: A Festival Of Art 40,000 July 320 Montgomery St Syracuse NY 13202 (315) 472-4245 B

NY The Syracuse Arts & Crafts Festival 60,000 June 109 S. Warren St. Ste !900 Syracuse NY 13202 (315) 422-8284 A-

NY Harvest Crafts Festival 20,000 Nov. P O Box 1688 Westhampton Bch NY 11978 (516) 288-2004 B+

NY Westhampton Outdoor Art Show 10,000 Aug. P. O. Box 1228 Westhampton Bch NY 11978 516-288-3337 A

NY Handmade In The Usa 12,000 Jan. 10 Bank Street #1200 White Plains NY 10606 914-421-3287 A

NY Christmas In The Country 53,000 Nov. 4310 Tilson Road Wilmington NC 28412 910-799-9424 A+

NY Woodstock-New Paltz A & C Fair 25,000 Sept. P. O. Box 825 Woodstock NY 12498 845-679-8087 B

NY Fall Crafts At Lyndhurst 20,000 September P. O. Box 286 Woodstock NY 12498 845-331-7900 B+

NY Woodstock New Paltz  Crafts Fest 20,000 May P. O. Box 825 Woodstock NY 12498 (845) 679-8087 B+

NY Crafts Park Avenue 10,000 April 4 Deming St Woodstock NY 12498 (914) 679-7277 A+

NY  Allentown Art Festival 500,000 June Ellicott Stn P.O. Box 1566 Buffalo NY 14205 716-881-4269 A

OH Wonderful World Of Ohio Mart 20,000 Oct. 714 P. O.Rtage Path Akron OH 44303 216-836-5535 A

OH Christmas In The Colonies 25,000 Nov. P. O. Box 40298 Bay Village OH 44264 216-835-1765 A+

OH Christmas In The Colonies 12,000 November P. O. Box 40298 Bay Village OH 44140 440-835-1765 B

OH Fine Craft Festival 7,000 April 26001 S Woodland Beachwood OH 44122 (216) 831-0700 A+

OH Salt Fork Arts & Crafts Festival 50,000 Aug. 7570 Marysville Road Byesville OH 43723 (740) 685-1350 B

OH Christkindl Markt 10,000 Nov. 1001 Market Ave. N. Canton OH 44702 (216) 453-7666 A

OH Art By The Falls 25,000 June 155 Bell St Chagrin Falls OH 44022 (216) 247-7507 A-

OH Summerfair 79,000 May P. O. Box 8277 Cincinnati OH 45208 (513) 531-0050 B+

OH Clifton Arts And Musicfest 40,000 June 11650 Detroit Avenue Cleveland  OH 44102 216-228-4383 B

OH Cain Park Arts Festival 60,000 July 40 Severance Circle Cleveland Heights OH 44118 (216) 2913669 A+

OH Firestone Park Festival Of The Arts 12,000 August 28 West Friend Street Columbiana OH 44408 330-482-6183 nr

OH Craftfair At Hathaway Brown 11,000 June 1665 West 5th Avenue Columbus OH 43212 614-486-7119 B

OH Winterfair 19,000 Dec. 1665 W. 5th Columbus OH 43212 (614) 486-7119 A

OH Columbus Arts Festival 500,000 June 100 E. Broad Street Ste 2250 Columbus OH 43215 (614) 224-2606 A+

OH Kettering Holiday And Home 25,000 September 2511 Revere Avenue Dayton OH 45420 937-258-1104 B

OH Oktoberfest 32,000 Oct. 456 Belmonte Park  N. Dayton OH 45405 (513) 223-5277 B

OH Groveport Festival Of The Arts 5,000 Sept. 655 Blacklick St Groveport OH 43125 (614) 836-5301 B

OH Nutcracker Sweets 5,000 Oct. 7743 Salem Drive Hudson OH 44236 216-650-4327 A-

OH Kent Art In The Park 21,000 September 497 Middlebury Road Kent OH 44240 330-673-8897 B

OH Art On The Commons 15,000 Aug. 2655 Olson Drive Kettering OH 45420 513-296-O294 A

OH Lakewood Arts Festival 15,000 Aug. P O Box 7771288 Lakewood OH 44107 (216) 521-7063 B

OH Yankee Peddler Festival 100,000 Sept. 171 Granger Rd. #159 Medina OH 44256 (330) 665-3669 A+

OH Shaker Woods Festival 100,000 Aug. 46000 New England Square New Waterford OH 44445 216-457-7615 A+

OH Butler Prairie Peddler Old West Fest. 32,000 October P. O. Box 287 Norwalk OH 44857 419-663-1818 B

OH Boston Mills Artfest 25,000 June P O Box 175 Peninsula OH 44264 (216) 657-2334 A

OH Visions Of Sugarplums 10,000 Nov. P. O. Box 21093 S. Euclid OH 44121 216-932-2603 A-

OH Crosby Festival Of The Arts 15,000 June 5403 Elmer Drive Toledo OH 43615 (419) 936-2986 B+

OH Troy Strawberry Festival 175,000 June 405 S. W. Public Sq. #330 Troy OH 45373 937-339-7714 A-

OH Upper Arlington Labor Day Arts 30,000 Sept. 3600 Tremont Rd. Upper Arlington OH 43221 (614) 583-5310 A-

OH Art In The Park 15,000 July 791 Broad St. Wadsworth OH 44281 (216) 334-4484 B+

OH Sauerkraut Fest 300,000 Oct. P. O. Box 281 Waynesville OH 45068 513-897-8855 B

OH Westerville Music And Arts Fest+B725 40,000 July 99 Commerce Park Drive Westerville OH 43082 (614) 882-8917 A-

OH The Christmas Show 60,000 Nov. P. O. Box 45395 Westlake OH 44145 440-835-9627 A-

OH Xenia Old Fashioned Days Fest. 80,000 September 334 West Market Street Xenia OH 45385 937-372-3591 B+

OK Beavers Bend Folk Fest. And Craft 14,000 November P. O. Box 157 Broken Bow OK 74728 580-494-6497 nr

OK Downtown Edmond Art Festival 50,000 April P. O. Box 3653 Edmond OK 73083 405-249-9391 B

OK Grovefest 20,000 June 9630 Highway 59 N, Ste A Grove OK 74344 918-786-9070 nr

OK Pumpkin Patch Benefit A And C Show 10,000 November 213 S. Oklahoma Guymon  OK 73942 580-338-4576 nr

OK Arts For All Festival 23,000 May P. O. Box 592 Lawton OK 73502 580-248-5384 B

OK An Affair Of The Heart  Oct. P. O. Box 890778 Oklahoma City OK 73189 405-632-2652 A-

OK Paseo Arts Festival 40,000 May 3000 North Lee Oklahoma City OK 73103 405-525-2688 B

OK Arts Festival Oklahoma 30,000 September 7777 South May Avenue Oklahoma City OK 73159 405-682-7576 B+

OK Spring Festival Of The Arts 700,000 April 400 W. California Oklahoma City OK 73102 (405) 270-4848 A+

OK Tulsa International Mayfest 300,000 May 201 W. 5th Ste. 460 Tulsa OK 74103 (918) 582-6435 A

OK Children's Medical Center Arts Fest 10,000 Feb. 5839 E 63rd St Tulsa OK 74136 (918) 494-7985 B+

OK Tulsa Arts & Crafts Fall Festival 15,000 Nov. P. O. Box 54424 Tulsa OK 74155 (918) 743-4311 B+

OR Wah Change Northwest Art And Air 30,000 August P. O. Box 490 Albany OR 97321 541-917-7777 B

OR Fall Festival 25,000 Sept. 420 Nw Second Corvalis OR 97330 503-757-1505 A-

OR Oregon Country Fair 50,000 July P. O. Box 2972 Eugene OR 97402 (541) 343-4298 A-

OR Lake Oswego Festival Of The Arts 25,000 June P. O. Box 385 Lake Oswego OR 97034 503-636-1060 B

OR Artquake-Art Street 200,000 Aug. P O Box 9100 Portland OR 97207 (503) 227-2787 A

OR Salem Art Fair & Festival 110,000 July 600 Mission Street Se Salem OR 97302 (503) 581-2228 A-

OR Crafts On The Coast Spring Fest. 23,000 May P. O. Box 1023 Yachats OR 97498 541-547-4738 B-

PA Mayfair Festival Of The Arts 400,000 May 2020 Hamilton St Allentown PA 18104 (610) 437-6900 B

PA Penn's Colony Festival 50,000 September P. O. Box 247 Allison Park PA 15101 724-352-9922 A-

PA Philadelphia Fine Art And Craft 10,000 July P. O. Box 347 Ardmore PA 19003 877-244-9768 nr

PA Buyers Markets Of American Craft 10,000 Feb. 3000 Chestnut Avenue, #300 Baltimore MD 21211 (410) 889-2933 A+

PA Bedford Fall Foliage Festival 35,000 October P. O. Box 234 Bedford PA 15522 814-624-3111 B+

PA Bellefonte Arts And Crafts Fair 12,000 August P. O. Box 472 Bellefonte PA 16823 814-353-1115 nr

PA Christkindlmarkt Bethlehem 54,000 November 25 West Third St. Ste 300 Bethlehem PA 18015 610-332-1327 B+

PA National Apple Harvest Festival 100,000 October P. O. Box 38 Biglerville PA 17307 717-677-9413 A-

PA Fall Pumpkin Fest 24,000 October P. O. Box 646 Conneaut Lake PA 16316 800-332-2338 B

PA Celebrate Erie 75,000 August 626 Sate Street Room 500 Erie PA 16501 814-870-1269 B

PA Ford City Area Heritage Days 100,000 July P. O. Box 205 Ford City PA 16226 724-783-1617 B

PA Patriot News Art Fest 150,000 May 444 S 2nd St. Harrisburg PA 17104 877-826-8614 B+

PA Arts And Crafts Colonial Festival 40,000 Sept. P. O. Box 166 Irwin PA 15642 724-863-4577 A-

PA North Park's Colonial Arts/Crafts Fair 22,000 Sept. P. O. Box 166 Irwin PA 15642 724-863-4577 B+

PA Pymatuning Pioneer And Art Festival 20,000 July P. O. Box 146 Jamestown PA 16134 724-927-9473 B

PA Fort Armstrong Folk Fest. 100,000 Aug. 138 North Water St. Kittanning PA 16201 724-545-9622 B+

PA Kutztown Festival 110,000 June P. O. Box 306  Kutztown PA 19530 610-285-0368 A-

PA Peddler's Village Apple Festival 21,000 November P. O. Box 218 Lahaska PA 18931 215-794-4059 B-

PA Long's Park Art And Craft Festival 17,000 Aug. P. O. Box 1553  Lancaster PA 17608 717-295-7054 A-

PA Westmoreland Arts And Heritage Fest. 250,000 July Rr2, Box 355a Latrobe PA 15650 724-834-7474 A-

PA Fort Ligonier Days 100,000 Oct. 120 East Main Ligonier PA 15658 (724) 238-4200 A-

PA Heart Of Lancaster County A And C 20,000 September P. O. Box 257 Lititz PA 17543 717-626-7369 B

PA Mt Gretna Outdoor Art Sh. 20,000 Aug. P. O. Box 561 Mt Gretna PA 17064 (717) 964-2340 A-

PA Pennsylvania Nat. Arts & Crafts Show 20,000 March P O Box 449 New Cumberland PA 17070 (717) 796-0531 B+

PA New Hope Arts And Crafts Festival 20,000 October P. O. Box 633 New Hope PA 18938 215-598-3301 B

PA Dutch Folk Festival 50,000 June 3760 Layfield Road Pennsburg PA 18073 (215) 679-9610 A+

PA Germantown Friends Craft Show 5,000 March 31 W Coulter St Philadelphia PA 19144 (215) 951-2340 A

PA Manayunk Arts Festival 250,000 June 111 Grape Street Philadelphia PA 19127 (215) 482-9565 A

PA Philadelphia Mus. Of Art Craft Show 30,000 Nov. P. O. Box 7646 Philadelphia PA 19101 (215) 684-7931 A+

PA Shadyside Summer Arts Festival 150,000 Aug. P. O. Box 4866 Pittsburgh PA 15206 412-621-8481 A+

PA Three Rivers Art Festival 600,000 June 707 Penn Ave. Pittsburgh PA 15222 (412) 281-8723 A

PA A Fair In The Park (Mellon Park) 25,000 Sept. 340 Bigbee St, #2 Pittsburgh PA 15211 (412) 431-6270 A-

PA Annual State Craft Fair 18,000 July 10 Stable Mill Trail Richboro PA 18954 (215) 579-5997 B

PA Tall Oaks Autumn Fest In The Woods 50,000 September 154 Star Route Sheffield PA 16347 814-968-5558 B

PA Mountain Craft Days 14,000 September 10649 Somerset Pike Somerset PA 15501 814-445-6077 B

PA Central Penn.Festival Of The Arts 150,000 July P O Box 1023 State College PA 16804 (814) 237-3682 A

PA Yorkfest 20,000 August 1 West Market Street York PA 17401 717-848-9339 B

PA  Greater Pittsburgh Holiday Spect. 19,000 Nov. P. O. Box 166 Irwin PA 15642 724-863-4577 A-

PA  Arts And Crafts Christmas Festival 22,000 Oct. P. O. Box 166 Irwin PA 15642 724-863-4577 B+

RI Scituate Art Festival 100,000 Oct. P. O. Box 126 North Scituate RI 02857 401-647-0057 A+

RI Virtu Art Festival 20,000 May 1 Chamber Way Westerly RI 02891 401-596-7761 B

RI Wickford Fine Art Festival 60,000 July 36 Beach St. Wickford RI 02852 (401) 295-4075 A-

SC Aiken's Makin's 30,000 September P. O. Box 892 Aiken SC 29801 803-641-1111 B

SC Columbia Fine Art And Craft Show 25,000 September P. O. Box 347 Ardmore PA 19003 877-244-9768 B

SC Craft Show At Piccolo Spoleto 10,000 May P. O. Box 22152 Charleston SC 29413 (843) 723-2938 B

SC Southeastern Arts & Crafts Expo 70,000 Sept. 1112 Bull St Columbia SC 29201 (803) 343-2155 B

SC Atalaya Arts & Crafts Festival 10,000 Sept. 1205 Pendleton St Columbia SC 29201 (803) 734-0517 B

SC Craftsmen's Classic 30,000 Oct. 1240 Oakland Ave Greensboro NC 27403 336-274-5550 B

SC Craftsmens Classic A+B837 And C 20,000 Aug. 1240 Oakland Ave Greensboro NC 27403 336-274-5550 B

SC Hill Skills 15,000 Oct. 627 Pelham Rd Greenville SC 29615 (803) 288-4088 B+

SC Taste Of Town Food Festival 75,000 April 5157  Thoroughbred Way Grovetown GA 30813 706-840-1877 B-

SC Coastal Carolina Fair, Ladson 250,000 October P. O. Box 762 Ladson SC 29456 843-572-3161 B

SC Charleston Made In The South 15,000 December P. O. Box 853 Matthews NC 28106 704-847-9480 B+

SC Myrtle Beach Arts And Fall Festival 90,000 October 1325 Celebrity Circle Myrtle Beach SC 29577 70-840-1877 B

SC Flowertown Festival 250,000 March 140 South Cedar Street Summerville SC 29483 (843) 871-9622 A

SC Ware Shoals Catfish Festival 25,000 May P. O. Box 510 Ware Shoals SC 29692 864-456-7664 B

SD Aberdeen Arts In The Park 20,000 June P. O. Box 126 Aberdeen SD 57402 605-226-1557 B

SD Sioux Falls Autmn Fest. 20,000 October P. O. Box 184 Boys Town NE 68010 402-331-2889 B+

SD Summer Arts Festival 50,000 July P O Box 555 Brookings SD 57006 (605) 693-4595 A

SD Sioux Falls Sidewalk Arts Festival 50,000 September 301 South Main Street Sioux Falls SD 57104 605-367-7397 B

TN Memphis Fine Art Show 25,000 June P. O. Box 347 Ardmore PA 19003 877-244-9768 B

TN Webb School Arts And Crafts Fest 85,000 October P. O. Box 222 Bell Buckle TN 37020 931-389-6784 B

TN Ketner's Mill Country Fair 25,000 Oct. P. O. Box 1447 Chattanooga TN 37401 615-821-3238 A+

TN Meriwether Lewis Arts And Crafts 30,000 October P. O. Box 676 Columbia Tn 38401 931-381-9494 B

TN Holiday Market A And C Memphis 12,000 November P. O. Box 1327 Cordova TN 38088 901-854-6589 B

TN Unicoi County Apple Festival 90,000 October P. O. Box 713 Erwin TX 37650 423-743-3000 B

TN Lenoir City Arts And Crafts Festival 15,000 June P. O. Box 183 Lenoir City TN 37771 865-986-7757 B

TN Pink Palace Crafts Fair 40,000 Oct. 3050 Central Ave. Memphis TN 38111 (901) 320-6408 A+

TN Art In The Park 45,000 Oct. 3100 Walnut Grove # 402 Memphis TN 38111 (901) 761-1278 A-

TN American Artisan Festival 50,000 June 4231 Harding Nashville TN 37205 615-298-4691 A+

TN Taca Fall Crafts  40,000 Sept. P O Box 120066 Nashville TN 37212 (615) 385-1904 A

TN Christmas Village 30,000 Nov. P O Box 158826 Nashville TN 37215 (615) 320-5353 B

TN Harvest Crafts Festival 35,000 Oct. 2354 Chapman Highway Sevierville TN 37876 423-453-3497 A-

TX Shrimpo Ree Of Texas 55,000 June P. O. Box 1949 Aransas Pass  TX 78335 361-758-2750 B

TX Laguna Gloria Festival 30,000 May P. O. Box 5705 Austin TX 78763 (512) 458-6073 A

TX Armadillo Christmas Bazaar 35,000 Dec. 4428 Gillis St. Austin TX 78745 (512) 447-1605 A+

TX The Peddler Show/Arlington 20,000 November 5508 Hwy 290 West #208 Austin TX 78735 512-358-1000 B

TX Bryan College Station Arts And Music 25,000 September 3160 Bee Caves Road #201 Austin TX 78704 512-441-9015 B

TX The Peddler Show/Fredericksburg 20,000 November 5508 Hwy 290 West #208 Austin TX 78735 512-358-1000 B

TX Scarecrow Festival 20,000 October 9220 Poplar Street Chappel Hill TX 77426 979-836-6033 B

TX Deep Ellum Arts Festival 80,000 April 2626 Cole Ave. Ste. 400 Dallas TX 75204 214-855-1881 B-

TX Artfest / The 500, Inc. 80,000 May 11300 N Central, #415 Dallas TX 75243 (214) 565-0200 A

TX Main Street Fort Worth Arts Festival 40,000 April 306 W 7th St, #400 Fort Worth TX 76102 (817) 336-ARTS A+

TX Fulton Oysterfest 30,000 March P. O. Box 393 Fulton TX 78358 361-729-2388 B

TX Dickens On The Strand 42,000 November 502 20th Street Galveston TX 77550 409-765-7834 B

TX Georgetown Red Poppy Festival 25,000 April P.O. Box 409 Georgetown TX 78627 512-930-3545 B

TX Granbury Arts And Crafts Festival 45,000 July 3408 East Highway 377 Granbury TX 76049 817-573-1622 B

TX Bayou City Art Festival 27,000 Oct. P. O. Box 66650 Houston TX 77266 713-521-0133 B+

TX Bayou City Art Fest. Memorial Park 35,000 March P. O. Box 66650 Houston TX 77266 713-521-0133 B+

TX Conroe Cajun Catfish Festival 35,000 October P. O. Box 541992 Houston TX 77254 713-863-9994 B

TX Nutcracker Market 63,000 November P. O. Box 130487 Houston TX 77219 713-523-6300 B+

TX The Houston International Fest. 500,000 April 1221 Lamar, #715 Houston TX 77010 (714) 654-8808 B

TX Keller Festival 20,000 May P. O. Box 761 Keller TX 76244 817-498-1292 B

TX Texas State Arts And Crafts Fair 20,000 May P. O. Box 1527 Kerrville TX 78029 (210) 896-5711 B

TX Lubbock Arts Festival 30,000 April 2109 Broadway Lubbock TX 79401 (806) 744-2787 B

TX Poteet Strawberry Festival 75,000 April P. O. Box 227 Poteet TX 78065 830-276-8436 B

TX Cottonwood Arts Festival 20,000 Oct. 711 West Arapaho Richardson TX 75080 (214) 231-4624 A

TX Christmas At Old Fort Concho 20,000 December 630 South Oakes San Angelo TX 76903 325-657-4441 B

TX San Antonio Memorial Day A And C 45,000 May 110 Broadway, Ste 60 San Antonio TX 78205 210-227-4286 B

TX Fiesta Arts Fair 20,000 April 300 Aug.A San Antonio TX 78205 (210) 224-1848 B

TX Art On The Square  April P. O. Box 92611 Southlake TX 76092 817-421-6792 B

TX Texarkana Quadrangle Art And Music 35,000 September P. O. Box 2343 Texarkana TX 75504 903-793-4831 B

TX Parker County Peach Festival 35,000 July P. O. Box 310 Weatherford TX 76086 888-594-3801 B

TX Spring Fling 20,000 April 2 Eureka Circle Wichita Falls TX 76308 (940) 692-0923 A-

UT Salt Lake Family Christmast Gift Sh 25,000 November P. O. Box 2815 Kirkland WA 98083 800-521-7469 B

UT Orem Summerfest 100,000 June 859 E. 1810 North Orem UT 84097 801-229-7027 B+

UT Park City Art Festival 70,000 Aug. P O Box 1478 Park City UT 84060 (801) 649-8882 A+

UT America's Freedom Festival/Provo 100,000 July P. O. Box F Provo UT 84603 801-431-0027 B

UT The Utah Arts Festival 69,000 June 331 W. PierpoInt Ave Salt Lake City UT 84101 (801) 322-2428 A

UT St George Art Festival 15,000 April 86 S Main St. St George UT 84770 (801) 634-5850 B

VA Richmond Fine Art And Craft Show 25,000 August P. O. Box 347 Ardmore PA 19003 877-244-9768 B

VA Bedford Centerfest Art Show 20,000 September P. O. Box 405 Bedford VA 24523 540-586-2148 nr

VA Virginia Craft And Folk Art Fest 6,000 Oct. P. O. Box 310 Cashtown PA 17310 717-337-3060 A-

VA Craftsmen's Christmas Classic 35,000 Nov. P. O. Box 305 Chase City VA 23924 434-372-3996 A+

VA Crozet Arts And Crafts Festival 10,000 October P. O. Box 699 Crozet VA 22932 434-823-2211 nr

VA Crozet Arts & Crafts Festival 10,000 May P O Box 699 Crozet VA 22932 (804) 977-0406 A

VA City Of Fairfax Fall Festival 40,000 Oct. 3730 Old Lee Highway Fairfax VA 22030 703-385-7949 B

VA Arts And Crafts Augusta Expo Land 14,000 November P. O. Box 83 Fishersville CA 22939 540-337-2552 nr

VA Craftsmens Classic Arts And Crafts 20,000 Oct. 1240 Oakland Ave Greensboro NC 27403 336-274-5550 A

VA Virginia Carolina Craftsmen 30,000 Nov. 1240 Oakland Ave Greensboro NC 27403 (910) 274-5550 A+

VA Taste Of The Mountains Main Street 20,000 September P. O. Box 373 Madison VA 22727 540-948-4455 B

VA Manassas Fall Jubilee 20,000 October 9431 West Street Manassas VA 20110 703-361-6599 B

VA Fall Festival Of Folklife 375,000 Oct. 700 Town Center Drive  New Port News VA 23606 757-926-1400 B+

VA Gosport Arts Festival 60,000 May 1211 Colley Avenue #1 Norfolk VA 23517 757-446-2250 B

VA Ghent Art Show 45,000 May 2308 Granby St Norfolk, VA 23517 (804) 446-2250 A-

VA Stockley Gardens Spring Arts Fest 25,000 May 801 Boush St. Ste 302 Norfolk, VA 23510 (757) 625-6161 B

VA Occoquan Fall Arts And Crafts 200,000 Sept. P. O. Box 258 Occoquan VA 22125 703-491-2168 A

VA Northern Va Fine Arts Festival 50,000 May 11911 Freedom Drive Ste 110 Reston VA 20190 703-471-9242 A+

VA Bazaar Christmas Collection 25,000 December P. O. Box 8330 Richmond VA 23226 804-673-7015 B-

VA Hand Workshop Craft & Design Show 10,000 Nov. 1812 West Main St. Richmond VA 23220 (804)  353-009 A-

VA Arts In The Park 100,000 May 1112 Sunset Ave Richmond VA 23221 (804)  353-8198 B+

VA Festival In The Park-Craft Show 375,000 May P. O. Box 8276 Roanoke VA 24014 703-342-2640 A-

VA Roanoke Sidewalk Art Show 10,000 June One Market Square Roanoke  FL 24011 540-342-5760 B-

VA Christmas Market 23,000 Nov. P. O. Box 909 Virginia Beach VA 23451 757-417-7771 A

VA Neptune Fest+B882 Art And Craft Show 250,000 Sept. 2200 Parks Ave Virginia Beach VA 23451 757-425-0000 A-

VA Boardwalk Art Show 300,000 June 2200 Parks Ave Virginia Beach VA 23451 (757) 425-0000 B

VA Waterford Fair 30,000 October P. O. Box 142 Waterford VA 20197 540-882-3018 B

VA An Occasion For The Arts 15,000 Oct. P O Box 1520 Williamsburg VA 23187 (804) 229-5450 A-

VA Apple Harvest Arts And Crafts Fest. 15,000 September P. O. Box 412 Winchester VA 22604 540-868-7160 nr

VA Richmond Holiday Arts And Crafts 15,000 October P. O. Box 11565 Winston-Salem NC 27116 336-924-4539 B

VT Hildene Folage Art And Craft Fest.B888 14,000 Oct. P. O. Box 538 Putney VT 05346 802-387-5772 B

VT Art In The Park 7,000 Aug. 16 S. Main St. Rutland VT 05701 (802) 775-0356 A-

WA Anacortes Arts & Crafts Festival 50,000 Aug. 819 Commercial, Suite E Anacortes WA 98221 (360) 293-6211 B

WA Battle Ground Harvest Days 35,000 July 912 East Main Street Battle Ground WA 98604 360-687-1510 B

WA Art Museum Fair 280,000 July 510 Bellevue Way Ne Bellevue WA 98004 425-519-0742 A-

WA Sixth Street Fair & Taste Of Bellevue 50,000 July 500 108th Ave, Ne Ste 210 Bellevue WA 98004 (206) 453-1223 A-

WA Holiday Festival Of The Arts 20,000 December P. O. Box 2584 Bellingham WA 98227 360-676-8548 nr

WA Camas Days 20,000 July P. O. Box 919 Camas WA 98607 206-834-2472 B

WA Chataqua 45,000 July P. O. Box 501 Chewelah WA 99109 509-935-8891 B+

WA Best Of The Northwest 10,000 Nov. P O Box 1057 Clinton WA 98236 (360) 221-6191 B+

WA Coupeville Arts And Crafts Festival 20,000 August P. O. Box 611 Coupeville WA 98239 360-678-5116 B

WA Federal Way Festival 20,000 August P. O. Box 4724 Federal Way WA 98063 253-568-7351 B-

WA Tidefest 5,000 Dec. 5101 Rosedale St, Nw Gig Harbor WA 98335 (206) 851-6131 B

WA Issaquah Salmon Days Festival 150,000 Oct. 155 Nw Gilman Blvd Issaquah WA 98027 (206) 270-2532 B

WA Summerfest: Art And Wine Waterfront 35,000 July 620 Market Street Kirkland WA 98033 425-822-7161 B

WA Tacoma Holiday Food And Gift Fest. 45,000 October P. O. Box 2815 Kirkland WA 98083 800-521-7469 B

WA Skagit Valley Tulip Festival+B17 Fair 20,000 April P O Box 1801 Mount Vernon WA 98273 (360) 336-9277 B

WA Edmonds Arts Festival 90,000 June P O Box 125, 10924 Mukilteo Sp Mukilteo WA 98275 (206) 745-0799 B+

WA Super Saturday 20,000 June College Activities Bldg. 301 Olympia WA 98501 (360) 705-2556 B+

WA Celebrate Lavender Festival 30,000 July 105 1/2 East First Street Pprt Angeles WA 98362 877-681-3035 B

WA North Kitsap Arts And Crafts Fest. 30,000 July P. O. Box 2043 Poulsbo WA 98370 360-297-2490 B

WA Meeker Days 100,000 June P. O. Box 476 Puyallop WA 98371 253-840-2631 B+

WA A Victorian Country Christmas 45,000 November P. O. Box 73129 Puyallup WA 98373 253-770-0777 B

WA Allied Artists Sidewalk Show 45,000 July 89 Lee Boulevard Richland WA 99362 (509) 375-1345 A-

WA Christmas Memories 17,000 November 619 Meadows Drive East Richland WA 99352 509-627-1854 B

WA Fremont Fair 115,000 June P. O. Box 31151 Seattle GA 98103 206-694-6706 B+

WA Pike Place Street Festival 200,000 May 85 Pike Street #506 Seattle WA 98101 206-682-7453 B+

WA Festival Of The Arts 250,000 July 1916 Pike Place, #146 Seattle WA 98101 (206) 363-2048 A+

WA Northwest Folklife Festival-Crafts 220,000 May 305 Harrison Street Seattle WA 98109 (206) 684-7327 A

WA University District Street Fair 200,000 May 4714 University Way N E, #516 Seattle WA 98105 (206) 523-4272 B

WA Bumbershoot Art Market 185,000 Aug. P O Box 9750 Seattle WA 98109 (206) 281-7788 B+

WA Spokane Christmas Arts And Crafts 15,000 November P. O. Box 14987 Spokane WA 99214 509-924-0588 B

WA Artfest: Spokane 20,000 May West 2316 First Ave. Spokane WA 99204 (509) 456-3932 B+

WI Art In The Park 25,000 Aug. 130 N Morrison St Appleton WI 54911 (414) 733-4089 B

WI Madison Autumn A And C Affair 15,000 December P. O. Box 184 Boys Town NE 68010 402-331-2889 B

WI Mt. Mary Starving Artist Fair 15,000 Sept. 17160 Deer Park Dr. Brookfield WI 53005 (NO) PHONE A+

WI Franciscan Harvest Festival 15,000 August 503 S. Browns Lake Dr. Burlington WI 53105 262-763-3600 B-

WI Ozaukee Center Harvest Festival 30,000 September W62 N718 Riveredge Dr. Cedarburg WI 53012 262-377-8230 B

WI Wine And Harvest Festival Fine Arts 30,000 September P. O. Box 348 Grafton WI 53024 262-276-0549 B-

WI Artstreet 600,000 Aug. P O Box 704 Green Bay WI 54305 (414) 435-2787 B

WI Holy Hill Arts And Crafts Fair 15,000 September 1525 Carmel Road Hubertus WI 53033 262-966-7172 B

WI Art Fair On The Square 200,000 July 211 State St Madison, WI 53703 (608) 257-0158 A+

WI Lakefront Festival Of Arts 50,000 June 750 N. Art Museum Dr Milwaukee WI 53202 (414) 224-3200 A+

WI The Mile Of Art 5,000 Aug. 6801 N Yates Rd. Milwaukee WI 53217 (414) 351-7516 B

WI Morning Glory Crafts Fair 10,000 Aug. 1630 E Royall Pl. Milwaukee WI 53202 (414) 278-8295 B

WI Mount Horeb Art Fair 15,000 July P. O. Box 84 Mount Horeb WI 53572 608-437-5914 B

WI Oconomowoc Festival Of The Arts 25,000 Aug. P O Box 651 Oconomowoc WI 53066 (414) 567-1243 A

WI Sauk Prarietoday's Women A And C 40,000 September P. O. Box 143a Prarie Du Sac  WI 53578  nr

WI Outdoor Arts Fest 25,000 July 608 New York Ave Sheboygan WI 53081 (920) 458-6144 B

WI Townline Art Fair 5,000 Oct. 10376 Hwy 42 Sister Bay WI 54234 (414) 854-4343 B

WI Cranberry Festival Art/Craft Show 100,000 Sept. P. O. Box 146 Warrens WI 54666 608-378-4250 B-

WI Wausau Festival Of The Arts 30,000 Sept. P O Box 1763 Wausau WI 54402 (715) 842-1676 A

WI Watermelon Days Craft Fest 15,000 July 705 Bugbee Avenue Wausau  WI 54401 715-675-6201 B

WI Apple Harvest Craft Fair 13,000 September 705 Bugbee Avenue Wausau  WI 54401 715-675-6201 B

WI Art World 30,000 September 705 Bugbee Avenue Wausau  WI 54401 715-675-6201 B

WI Craft Fair Usa 18,000 Oct. 9312 West National Ave West Allis WI 53227 414-321-2100 A

WV West Virginia Strawberry Festival 65,000 May P. O. Box 117 Buchannon WV 26201 304-473-8122 B

WV Mountain Heritage Art & Craft Fest. 25,000 Sept. P O Box 426 Charles Town WV 25414 (800) 624-0577 A+

WV New River Gorge Bridge Day 70,000 October 310 Oyler Avenue Oak Hill WV 25901 304-658-5574 B

WV Firemen's Art And Craft Festival 25,000 September R.R. 3, Box 35 Phillippi WV 26416  B

WV Mountain State Arts & Craft Fair 30,000 July P. O. Box 389 Ripley WV 25271 304-372-8159 A

WV Stonewall Jackson Heritage A And C 45,000 September P. O. Box 956 Weston WV 26452 304-369-1863 B+

WV Oglebayfest Artists' Market 50,000 Oct. 1330 National Rd. Wheeling WV 26003 (304) 242-7700 B

WY Mountain Artists Rendezvous 7,000 July P. O. Box 1248 Jackson Hole WY 83001 (307) 733-8792 B

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top 1,100 Craft Galleries in the United States

 

This is a list of some of the best craft galleries in the U. S.  This list is correct as of January, 2007.  Galleries on this list seem to go out of business at the rate of about 50 per year. This list is available on the CD-Rom (top1100fairs.xls) for you to print your own labels with Microsoft Word (see page 87).  

 

You can get postcards from www.printing4less.com (800) 930-6040. They have a very good web site for estimating price, and you can upload files made with Microsoft Publisher.

 

The 4” x 6” postcard size will usually be adequate, or you can get 6” by 8” for a bigger impression. The smaller size takes a 23 cent stamp, while the next size requires a 39 cent stamp (these prices will probably change, of course, by the time you read this).  

 

NAME ADDRESS CITY ST ZIP

Alaska Gift Gallery Box 322 Sitka AK 99385

Annie Kaill's 244 Front Street Juneau AK 99801

Artique, Ltd. 314 G. St. Anchorage AK 99501

Artworks, The 3677 College Road Fairbanks AK 99709

Blue Heron Gallery 123 Steadman Street Ste. B Ketchikan AK 99901

Color Creek-Fiber Art 3901 Mountain View Drive Anchorage AK 99508

Decker/Morris Gallery P. O. Box 101403 Anchorage AK 99510

Dockside Gallery and Bead Shoppe 5 Salmon Landing, Ste. 212 Ketchikan AK 99901

Echos Of Alaska 4th and Broadway Skagway AK 99840

Lynch & Kennedy 350 Broadway Skagway AK 99840

Scanlon Gallery 318 Mission St. Ketchikan AK 99901

Anton Haardt Gallery 1226 South Hull St. Montgomery AL 36104

Gallery Alegria 600 Olde English Lane #128 Birmingham AL 95223

Gallery at Kentuck 503 Main Ave. Nortport AL 35476

Marcia Weber Art Studio 1050 Woodley Rd. Montgomery AL 36106

Rattling Gourd Gallery P. O. Box 69 Loachapoka AL 36865

Space One Eleven 2409 Second Ave. North Birmingham AL 35203

The Villager 824 East Glenn Ave Auburn AL 36830

Big Muddy P. O. Box 118 Bentonville AR 72712

Blue Moon Gallery 718 Central Ave. Hot Springs AR 71901

Cliff Cottage Gallery 42 Armstrong St. Eureka Springs AR 72632

Enigma American Craft Gallery 15 N. Block AVe Fayetteville AR 72071

Gryphon's Roost Gallery/Day Spa 137 Spring St. Eureka Springs AR 72632

Heights Gallery 5801 Kavanaugh Blvd. Little Rock AR 72207

Iris at the Basin Park 8 Spring St. Eureka Springs AR 72632

Muse Gallery 509 W. Spring St.  Ste 450 Fayetteville AR 72701

Quickslver Gallery 73 Spring Street Eureka Springs AR 72632

River Market Artspace 301 E. Markham St. Little Rock AR 72201

Stanhope's 1302 State Line Avenue Texarkana AR 71854

Zarks ? A Fine Design Gallery 67 Spring Street Eureka Springs AR 72632

Arkansas Craft Gallery Box 800 Mountain View AR  72560

A'Loft Gallery of Fine Art 130 W.Gurley St., Ste. 302 Prescott AZ 86301

Details & Green Shoe Laces 2990 North Swan Road, #147 Tucson AZ 85712

Ertco 336 HWY 179 A-107 Sedona AZ 86336

Gallery Materia 4222 N. Marshall Way Scottsdale AZ 85251

Genesis Gift Gallery 6501 E. Cave Creek Rd. Cave Creek AZ 85331

Gifted Hands Gallery P. O. Box 1388 Sedona AZ 86836

LeKAE Gallery 7175 E. Main St. Scottsdale AZ 85251

Mariah James Gallery P. O. BOX 3121 TUBAC AZ 85646

Obsidian Gallery 4340 N. Campbell Tucson AZ 85718

Philabaum Glass Gallery 4280 N. Cambell Ave Ste 105 Tucson AZ 85718

Pinnacle Gallery 23417 North Pima Road, #161 Scottsdale AZ 85255

Scherer Gallery 671 Hwy 179 Sedona AZ 86336

Seasons of Tucson 7121 N. Oracle Road Tucson AZ 85704

The Bead Museum 5754 W. Glenn Dr. Glendale AZ 85301

Vision Gallery 80 South San Marcos Pl. Chandler, AZ 85224

A Gallery of Fine Art 73-956 El Paseo Palm Desert CA 92260

ACCI 1652 Shattuck Berkeley CA 94709

Acropolis Now 1933 South Broadway, Suite 101 Los Angeles CA 90007

Adamm's American Crafts 1426 Fourth St. Santa Monica CA 90401

Anniglass Eyecandy 110 Cooper Street Ste.F Santa Cruz CA 95060

Art for the Soul 210 Marine Ave., Ste. A Balboa Island CA 92662

Artful Eye, The 8910 Jeannette Ave Sebastopol CA 95472

Artful Soul 1237-C Prospect St. La Jolla CA 92037

Artisan's 111 W. 7th St. Hanford CA 93230

Backroads Contemp.Craft Gallery 2180 Old Creamery Rd., Box 16 Harmony CA 93435

Bella Cosa 250 Harvard Ave. Claremont CA 91711

Blue Oak Gallery Via La Circula Redondo Beach CA 90277

By the Bay Gallery 910 Embarcadero Morro Bay CA 93442

Cedanna 1925 Fillmore Street San Francisco CA 94115

Chambers Gallery 755 B Main Street Cambria CA 93428

Christensen Heller Gallery 5831 College Ave Oakland CA 94618

Coast Galleries P. O. Box 223519 Carmel CA 93922

Coda Gallery 73-151 El Paseo Palm Desert CA 92260

Contemporary Center 2630 West Sepulveda Boulevard Torrance CA 90505

Corbin Gallery 407 Townsend Dr. Aptos CA 95003

Corrie Glass 37683 Niles Blvd. Fremont CA 94536

Crystal Fox Gallery 381 Cannery Row Monterrey CA 93940

Crystal Reflections 425 San Anselmo Ave. San Anselmo CA 94960

Culture Shop Gallery 1221 Abbot Kinney Blvd. Venice CA 90291

D. P. Fong Gallery 383 S. First St. San Jose CA 94113

De Novo 250 University Ave Palo Alto CA 94301

Del Mano Gallery 11981 San Vincente Boulevard Los Angeles CA 90049

Destiny 4210 Bridge Street Cambria CA 93428

Dollerious Delights 1544 Locust St. Walnut Creek CA 94596

Dovetail Collection 407 Healdsburg Ave Healdsburg CA 95448

Dune Mehler Gallery 337 Mirada Road Half Moon Bay CA 94019

Dunn Mehler Gallery 337 Mirada Road Miramar Beach CA 94019

Eileen Bremen Gallery 619 N. Harbor Blvd. Fulerton CA 92832

Elizabeth Fortner Gallery 1114 State St. #9 Santa Barbara CA 93101

F. Dorian Gallery 388 Hayes St. San Francisco` CA 94102

Fire and Rain Gallery 705 Sutte Street Folsom  CA 95685

Flax 240 VALLEY DRIVE Brisbane CA 94005

Folk Tree Collection 199 South Fair Oaks Ave. Pasadena CA 91105

Food For Thought 31760 Camino Capistrano, Ste. C San Juan Capistrano CA 92675

Freehand 8413 West Third Street Los Angeles CA 90048

Gallery Alexander 7925 Girard Ave. La Jolla CA 92037

Gallery Eight 7464 Girard Avenue La Jolla CA 92037

Gallery House 320 California Ave. Palo Alto CA 94396

Gallery Judaica 1312 Westwood Blvd Los Angeles CA 90024

Gallery of Functional Art 2525 Michigan Ave. E-3 Santa Monica CA 90404

Gallery One 209 Western Avenue Petaluma CA 94952

Gatsby's 381 Cannery Row Suite N. Monterrey CA 93940

Gump's 135 Post San Francisco` CA 94108

Hands Gallery 777 Higuera Street San Luis Obispo CA 93401

Hardy Diagnostics 1439 McCOY LN. Santa Maria CA 93455

Harvest Moon 13251 S. Hwy 101 Ste 1 Hopland CA 95449

Highlight Gallery 45052 Main St. Mendocino CA 95460

Hirzel Fine Jewelry 728 Santa Cruz Ave. Menlo Park CA 94025

Human Arts 310 East Ojai Ave Ojai CA 93023

Humboldt's Finest 417 2nd Street Eureka CA 95501

Huntington Library Gift Shop 1151 Oxford Road San Marino CA 91108

Jessel Miller Gallery 1019 Atlas Peak Rd. Napa CA 94558

John Natsoulas Gallery 140 F. St. Davis CA 95616

Ken McMaster P. O. Box 223519 Calpine CA 96124

L.H. Selman Ltd. 123 Locust St. Suite OL Santa Cruz CA 95060

Legion of Honor Museum Store 34th Avenue and Clement Street San Francisco CA 94121

Lily Rock Gallery 54245 Circle Dr. Ste. 7-C Idyllwild CA 92549

Luna 4928 East 2nd Street Long Beach CA 90803

Mackenzies Gallery of Am. Style 2766 East Bidwell, Ste. 600 Folsom CA 95630

Main Element 1000 Main Street #10 Napa CA 94559

Main Street Gallery 106 Main Street Murphys CA 95247

Mateel Art Cooperative Gallery 773 Redwood Dr. Garberville CA 95542

Meadowlark Gallery 317 Corte Madera Town Center Corte Madera CA 94925

Melting Pot, The Main and Lansing Streets Mendocino CA 95460

Michael's 118 West Washington Boulevard Crescent City CA 95531

Mill Valley Sculptor Garden 219 Shoreline Hwy. Mill Valley CA 94941

Mingei Int. Museum Gift Store P. O. Box 553 La Jolla CA 92038

Mixt 1722 South Catalina Avenue Redondo Beach CA 90277

Moonstones Gallery 4070 Burton Dr. Cambria CA 93428

Museum of Contemporary Art Shop 250 Grand Avenue Los Angeles  CA 90012

Museum of the American West 4700 Western Heritage Way Los Angeles  CA 90027

New Stone Age 8407 W. Third St. Los Angeles CA 90048

Nina Gerety 1704 Tiburon Blvd. Tiburon CA 94920

North Bay Gallery 6525 Washington Street 2nd Flr Yountville CA 94599

Not Only Baja! 306-312  Oak Street Brentwood CA 90049

Oakland Museum Store 1000 Oak Street Oakland CA 94607

Objects 1187 Coast Village Rd. Montecito CA 93108

Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Boulevard Fremont CA 94537

Palo Alto Art Center 1313 Newell Rd. Palo Alto CA 94301

Panache 45110 Main St. Mendocino CA 95460

Plaza Design 808 G. St. Arcata CA 95521

Positively Fourth Street 628 4th Street Santa Rosa CA 95404

Raw Style 1511 Montana Avenue Santa Monica CA 90403

Red Envelope 149 New Montgomery St. Gd. Fl. San Francisco CA 94105

Regent Jewelry and Gifts 6525 Washington St. Yountville CA 94599

Renaissance Solvang 486 FIRST ST. #L Solvang CA 93463

Rookie T. Gallery 14300 Highway 128 Boonville CA 95415

San Diego Natural History Museum 1788 El Prado San Diego CA 92101

San Francisco Craft and Folk Art Building A, Fort Mason Center San Francisco CA 94123

Sculpture to Wear 9638 Brighton Way Beverlee Hills CA 90210

Seekers Collection and Gallery 4090 Burton Dr. Cambria CA 93428

SF Museum of Modern Art Store 151 Third Street San Francisco CA 94103

Shalom House 19740 Ventura Boulevard Woodland Hills CA 91364

Sherwood Gallery 460 S. Coast Hwy Laguna Beach CA 92651

SJ Museum of Art Store 110 South Market Street San Jose CA 95113

Solarium 815 Grant Ave. Novato CA 94945

Solomon Dubnick Gallery 2131 Northrop Ave. Sacramento CA 95825

Spirals 7906 Girard Ave. La Jolla CA 92037

Studio 41 700 First St. Benecia CA 94510

Studio Forty Two Gallery 23 North Santa Cruz Avenue Los Gatos CA 95030

Summer House 21 Trockmorton Mill Valley CA 94941

Teller Galleries 16055 Ventura Blvd. #635 Encino CA 91436

Tercera 534 Ramona St. Palo Alto CA 94301

The Artery 207 G Street Davis CA 95616

The Gold Rush P. O. Box 1143 Graeagle CA 96103

The Last Straw 4540 IRVING ST. San Francisco CA 94122

The Vault 1339 Pacfic Avenue Santa Cruz CA 95060

The Zetter Collection 3261 Celinda Dr. Carlsbad CA 92008

Tops 23410 Civic Center Way Malibu CA 90265

Trios Gallery 130 South Cedros Ave. Solana Beach CA 92075

Twig Gallery of American Crafts 2163 Union St. San Francisco CA 94123

Two Babes in the Woods 55750 S. Circle Drive Box 3256 Idyllwild CA 92549

Velvet Da Vinci 508 Hayes ST. San Francisco CA 94102

Ventura County Museum Store 100 East Main Street Ventura CA 93001

Verdigris-The Cannery 2801 Leavenworth St. San Francisco CA 94115

Village Artisans 2315 Honolulu Ave Montrose CA 91020

Village Gallery 22651 Lambert #103 Lake Forest CA 92630

Virginia Brier Gallery 3091 Sacramento St. San Francisco CA 94115

Visions Gallery 201 N. Mt. Shasta Blvd Mt. Shasta CA 96067

Zosaku Fine Arts 1782 4th Street Berkeley CA 94710

Abloom 9433 S. UNIVERSITY BLVD Highlands Ranch CO 80126

Art Mart 1222 Pearl Boulder CO 80302

Artisans Gallery 2757 E. Third Ave. Denver CO 80206

Artistic Judaic Promotions 4990 S. Lafayette Lane Englewood CO 80110

Blue Zebra 1404 Larimer Denver CO 80202

Boulder Arts & Crafts Cooperative 1421 Pearl St. Mall Boulder CO 80302

Camera Obscura Gallery 1309 Bannock St. Denver CO 80204

Clay Pigeon, The 601 Ogden Street Denver CO 80218

Colorado Collection 19111 East Garden Place Aurora CO 80015

Culture Clash 101 North F Street Salida CO 81201

Evergreen Fine Art 3092 Evergreen Pkwy. Evergreen CO 80439

Fire Ice Gallery 8100 West Tenth Ave. Lakewood CO 80215

Foya 10497 Centennial Rd. Littleton CO 80125

Gallery 150 150 W. First St. Salida CO 81201

Georgetown Gallery 612B Sixth Street, P.O. Box 402 Georgetown CO 80444

Human Touch Galleries 8 Canon Ave. Manitou Springs CO 80829

J. Cotter Gallery 234 Wall Street Vail CO 81657

Luma -- The Broadmoor Hotel 1 Lake Ave. Colorado Springs CO 80906

Mackin Katz Gallery 2041 Broadway Boulder CO 80302

Middle Fish 1500 Pearl St. Boulder CO 80302

Might as Well P. O. Box 603 Littleton CO 80160

Mountain Spirit Gallery 201 F Street Salida CO 81201

Original Accents P. O. Box 627 Grand Junction CO 81502

Pismo Galleries 235 Fillmore St. Denver CO 80206

RAF 6913 W. Lakeside Dr. Littleton CO 80125

Rare Things 106 Main St. Creede CO 81130

Redstone Art Closet 364 Redstone Blvd. Redstone CO 81623

Show of Hands 210 Clayton Street Denver CO 80206

Smith-Klein Gallery 1116 Pearl Boulder CO 80302

Steamboat Art Company 903 Lincoln Avenue Steamboat Springs CO 80487

Stonehenge 504 Sixth Street, P.O. Box 636 Georgetown CO 80444

Taminah Gallery, Gifts and Frame 414 Pagosa Street, P. O. 4487 Pagosa Springs CO 81157

Termer Gallery 780 Main Avenue Durango CO 81301

The Evergreen Gallery P.O. Box 431 Evergreen CO 80437

The Johnson Building Gallery 124 North Main Gunnison CO 81230

The Watersweeper and the Dwarf 717 Grande Ave. Glenwood Springs CO 81601

Waterfall Hope 307 S. Mill Street Aspen CO 81611

West SouthWest 257 Fillmore St. Denver CO 80206

An Artisian's Marketplace 120 East Street Plainville CT 06062

Artists Market 163 Main Street Norwalk CT 06851

Brookfield Craft Center, Inc. 286 Whisconier Road Brookfield CT 06804

Company of Craftsmen 43 West Main Street Mystic CT 06355

Engleman Gallery 1014A Chapel Street New Haven CT 06510

Evergreen Fine American Crafts 21 Boston St. Guilford CT 06437

Fair Haven Woodworks 72 Blatchley Ave. New Haven CT 06513

Fisher Gallery Shop Farmington Valley Arts Center Avon CT 06001

Florence Griswold Museum Shop 96 Lyme Street Old Lyme CT 06371

Gallery 12 29 Whitfield St. Guilford CT 06437

Guilford Handcrafts, Inc 411 Church Street Guilford CT 06437

Heron American Craft Gallery 16 N. Main St. Kent CT 06757

Honore Gallery 995 B Farming Avenue West Hartford CT 06107

Hoot Inc., The East Brook Mall Willimantic CT 06226

J. C. Glassworks 990 Main Street Branford CT 06405

Mattatuck Museum 144 West Main Street Waterbury CT 06702

Sculpture to Wear 11 Salt Meadow Ln Madison CT 06443

Swanton of Essex One Griswald Square Essex CT 06426

The Green Fox Gallery 15 Water Street Torrington CT 06790

The Ironwood Gallery Box 449 Ridgefield CT 06877

The Museum Shop 600 Main St. Hartford CT 06103

The Silo 44 Upland Road New Milford CT 06776

Tresor Gallery 951A Farmington Ave. West Hartford CT 06107

Wave 107 Main Street New Canaan CT 06840

American Hand Plus 2906 M Street, NW Washington DC 20007

apartment zero 406 7th St. N.W. Washington DC 20004

Appalachian Spring 1415 Wisconsin Ave. N.W. Washington DC 20007

Art & Soul 225 Pennsylvania Ave. S.E. Washington DC 20003

As Kindred Spirits Reagan National Airport Term. B Washington DC 20001

Beadazzled 1507 Connecticut Ave. N.W. Washington DC 20036

Folger Museum Shop 201 East Capital Street SE Washington DC 20003

Jackie Chalkley Gallery 5301 Wisconsin Avenue NW Washington DC 20015

Lbrary of Congress Museum Store 101 Independence Ave, SE Washington DC 20540

Maurine Littleton Gallery 1667 Wisconsin Ave. N.W. Washington DC 20007

National Cathredral Museum Store 3101 Wisconsin Ave. NW Washington DC 20016

Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian MRC 510, P. O. Box 37012 Washington DC 20013

The Magical Animal 3222 M Street NW Washington DC 20007

Wake Up Little Suzie 3409 Connecticut Ave. NW Washington DC 20008

Beyond Dimensions 59 South Governor's Ave. Dover DE 19904

Blue Streak Gallery 1721-1723 Delaware Ave. Wilmington DE 19806

Creations Fine Woodworking Gallery 451 Hockessin Corner Hockessin DE 19707

Delaware Art Museum 2301 Kentmere Parkway Wilmington DE 19806

Down By the Bay 205 Second St. Lewes DE 19958

Ellen Rice Gallery 103 Atlantic Ave Ocean View DE 19970

Grassroots Gallery 93 East Main St. Newark DE 19711

Panache 129 B. Rehobeth Ave. Rehobeth Beach DE 19971

Winterthur Museum Gift Shop Route 52 Winterthur DE 19735

A Mixed Bag 8912 Laurel Dr. Pinellas Park FL 33782

Art Center 719 Central Ave. St. Petersburg FL 33701

Artisan's Gallery 5402 NW 8th Ave. Gainesville FL 32605

Arts and Antiques Gallery 702 Centre St. Fernandina Beach FL 32034

Artsiphartsi 2717 W. Kennedy Blvd. Tampa FL 33609

Atlantic Beach Potters 400 Levy Rd. Atlantic Beach FL 32233

Avalon Gallery 425 E. Atlantic Ave. Delray Beach FL 33483

B. Hock Gallery 5810 Sunset Drive Miami FL 33143

Bayfront Gallery 713 S. Palafox Pensacola FL 32501

Brooke Pottery 223 North Kentucky Avenue Lakeland FL 33801

Crystal Mirage Gallery 800 Second Avenue NE St. Petersburg FL 33701

Dali Museum Gift Store 1000 Third Street South St. Petersburg FL 33701

Deborah and Friends P. O. Box 1491 Mt. Dora FL 32754

Dennison-Maran Gallery 696 5th Avenue. South Naples FL 34102

DreamWeaver 364 St Armands Cir Sarasota FL 34236

First Street Gallery 216 B First St. Neptune Beach  FL 32266

Florida Craftsmen Gallery 501 Central Ave. St. Petersburg FL 33701

Funky Monkey 12199 Indian Rocks Rd. Largo FL 33774

Galeria of Sculpture 11 Via Parigi Palm Beach FL 33480

Gallery Five 387 Tequesta Drive Tequesta FL 33469

Gallery Morada 81610 Overseas Highway Islamorada Fl 33036

Gene Brenner Pottery 104 N. Circle Seabring FL 33870

Gingerbread Square Gallery 1207 Duval Street Key West FL 33040

Glass Reunions of Key West 825 Duval St. Key West FL 33040

Glisco Visions P.O. Box 25217 Sarasota FL 34277

Grass Roots Gallery 411 W. Dearborn St. Englewood FL 34223

Habatat Galleries 608 Banyan Trail Boca Raton FL 33431

Harmony Isle Gallery 902 NE 19th Ave Fort Lauderdale FL 33304

Heartworks Gallery 820 Lomax Jacksonville FL 32204

High Springs Gallery 115 N. Main St. High Springs FL 32643

Hodgell Gallery 46 South Palm Avenue South Sarasota FL 34236

Home Shopping Club 1 HSN Drive St. Petersburg FL 33729

Hoypoloi Gallery 1502 E. Buena Vista Drive Lake Buena Vista FL 32830

Inside Out Gallery 7400 Gulf Blvd. St. Pete Beach FL 33706

Ioma Art 6000 Glades Rd. #1206A Boca Raton FL 33431

Island Treasure 10709 Gulf Boulevard Treasure Island FL 33706

Justines MM 81.9 Islamorada FL 33036

Kravis Center Gallery 701 Okeechobee Blvd W. Palm Beach FL 33408

La Store 223 N. 12th Street Tampa FL 33602

Laughing Dog Gallery 23 Royal Palm Pointe #1A Vero Beach FL 32960

Lighting Solutions 11780 B. Metro Pkwy Fort Meyers FL 33912

Mosaica 2020 Hollywood Blvd. Hollywood FL 33020

Nancy Markoe Fine Crafts Gallery 3112 Pass-a-Grille Way St. Pete Beach FL 33706

Newbill Collection by the Sea P. O. Box 4809  309 Ruskin Pl. Seaside FL 32459

Nicholson House 2223 N. Westshore Blvd. Tampa FL 33607

Norton Museum Store 1451 S. Olive Avenue West Palm Beach FL 33401

On a Whim Gallery 12000 SE Dixie Highwayt Hobie Sound FL 33455

Peace Creek Trading Company 4204 S. Florida Avenue Lakeland FL 33813

Polk Museum of Art Store 800 East Palmetto Street Lakeland FL 33801

Prickly Pear 3251 SW Winding Way Palm City FL 34990

Seldom Seen Gallery 817 East Las Olas Blvd. Ft. Lauderdale FL 33301

Shapiro Studio & Gallery 538 Central Ave. St. Petersburg FL 33701

Sign of the Dolphin 652 Maderia Beach Causeway Madeira Beach FL 33708

Stage Right Interiors 924 N. Flagler Dr. Fort Lauderdale FL 33304

Suwannee Triangle Gallery 491 Dock Street Cedar Key FL 32625

The Giving Tree 5 North Blvd of the Presidents Sarasota FL 34236

Thornbrook Gallery 2441 NW 43rd St. Ste 6D Gainesville FL 33606

Timothys Gallery 236 N. Park Ave. Winter Park FL 32789

Traditions 19575 Biscayne Blvd. Aventura FL 33180

Tumbleweed 14611 BALGOWAN RD#104 Miami Lakes FL 33016

Unique Boutique 1185 3rd St. S Naples FL 34102

Artrages Gallery 6035 Sandy Springs Cir. NE Atlanta GA 30328

By Hand South 112 E. Ponce de Leon Ave. Decatur GA 30030

Gallery 209 209 E. River Street Savannah GA 31401

High Museum of Art Shop 1280 Peachtree Street Ne Atlanta GA 30309

Labaire Pottery 35 South Peachtree Street Norcross GA 30071

Main Street Gallery 51 N. Main St. Clayton GA 30525

Mainstreet Art Company 21 South Main Street Alpharetta GA 30004

Mucklow's Fine Jewelry 552 Crosstown Road Peachtree City GA 30269

Out of the Woods Gallery 22-B Bennett Street NW Atlanta GA 30309

Raiford Gallery 1169 Canton Street Roswell GA 30075

Signature Shop and Gallery 3267 Roswell Rd. N. W. Atlanta GA 30305

Smith Jewelers 130 W. Jackson St Dublin GA 31021

Soho 5482 Chamblee Dunwoody Rd. Atlanta GA 30338

Wildcat on a Wing 10061 Ball Ground Highway Ball Ground GA 30107

Biasa Rose Boutique 104 Hana Hwy. Box 97 Paia, Maui HI 96779

Bishop Museum Shop Pacifica 1525 Bernice Street  Honolulu HI 96817

Chelsea 2752 Woodlawn, Ste 5-110 Honolulu HI 96822

Elizabeth Doyle Galleries 119 Bay Drive Lahaina HI 96761

Hawaii Craftsmen P O Box 22645 Honolulu HI 96823

Jeff Chang Pottery and Fine Crafts 45-523 Kiani St. Kanoehe HI 96744

Kahn Galleries 3129 Pelike St. Lihue HI 96766

Kebanu, A Gallery 3440 Poipu Rd Koloa HI 96756

Kii Gallery P. O. Box 791189 Paia HI 96779

Lavender Moon Gallery 79-7404 Mamalohoa Highway Kealakekua  HI 96750

Martin & Macarthur Whaler's 2435 Kaanapali Pkwy #A-4 Lahaina HI 96761

Nohea Galleries 5000 Kahala Ave. Honolulu HI 96816

Reflections of the Heart 4211 Waialae Ave #C8 Honolulu HI 96816

Volcano Arts Center P. O. Box 129 Volcano Village HI 96785

Volcano Gallery Box 699 Volcano Village HI 96785

Woodshop Gallery P. O. Box 280 Paauilo HI 96776

Agora Arts 104 E. Water St., Ste. 1 Decorah IA 52101

AKAR 257 E. Iowa Ave. Iowa City IA 52240

Arts on Grand 408 North Grand Ave. Spencer IA 51301

Campbell Steele 1064 7th Ave. Marion IA 52302

Charles Mac Nider Museum 303 2nd St. Southeast Mason City IA 50401

CornerHouse Gallery and Frame 2753 First Ave., SE Cedar Rapids IA 52402

Henry Myrtle Gallery 915 West 23rd St. Cedar Falls IA 50613

JK Creative Wood and Gifts 2410 105th St Kalona IA 52247

Laree's 306 First East Street Independence IA 50644

M.C. Ginsberg 110 East Washington St. Iowa City IA 52240

Sticks 3631 Southwest 61st St. Des Moines IA 50321

Anne Reed Gallery 620 Sun Valley Road, Box 597 Ketchum ID 83340

Boise Art Museum Store 670 Julia Davis Drive Boise ID 83702

R. Grey Gallery 818 W. Idaho St. Boise ID 83702

Roland Gallery Box 221 Ketchum ID 83340

Tara-James Gallery 200 S. Main Street Pocatello ID 83204

Whitetail Butte Gallery 5549 Gleason McAbee Road Priest River ID 83856

Ancient Echoes 1003 W. Armitage Chicago IL 60614

ArtFX 1629 2nd Ave Rock Island IL 61201

Artisan Shop & Gallery 248 Robert Parker Coffin Road Long Grove IL 60047

Artisan Shop and Gallery 1515 Sheridan Road Wilmette IL 60091

Artists' Works 32 West Chicago Avenue Naperville IL 60540

Arts & Artisans 108 South Michigan Avenue Chicago IL 60603

Best Art Shop and Gallery 4 East Jefferson Naperville IL 60540

Chairoscuro 700 North Michigan Ave. Chicago IL 60611

Citywoods 651 Central Ave. Highland Park IL 60035

Coveny Lane 30 East Burlington Street Riverside IL 60546

Function + Art 1046 West Fulton Market Chicago IL 60607

Gallery of Precious Objects 113 S. 3rd St. Geneva IL 60134

Gallimaufry Gallery 4712 N. Lincoln Ave Chicago IL 60625

Ginkgo Tree Bookshop 951 Chicago Avenue Oak Park IL 60302

Greenleaf Gallery 1760 Sunset Lane Bannockburn IL 60015

Illinois State Museum Gift Shops Spring and Edwards Streets Springfield IL 62706

Jane Miller 2626 N. Lakeview Ave. Chicago IL 60614

Lindsey Gallery 111 N. Oak Park Oak Park IL 60301

Lockport Street Gallery 503 W. Lockport St. Plainfield IL 60544

Lotton Gallery 900 N. Michigan Ave., Level 4 Chicago IL 60611

Marx Gallery 230 West Superior Chicago IL 60610

Menshenables Judaica 1173 McHenry Road Buffalo Grove IL 60089

Mindscape Adornments 2114 Central Street Evanston IL 60201

Northern Possessions 900 N. Michigan Ave. Chicago IL 60611

Oriental Institute Museum Store 1155 East 58th Str. Chicago Il 60637

Pieces Gallery 644 Central Ave Highland Park IL 60035

Poopsie's 107 South Main St. Galena IL 61036

Prestige Art Gallery 3909 West Howard Street Skokie IL 60076

Priveleges 1618 North Alpine Road Rockford IL 61107

Riverview Gallery 588 Latham Dr. Ste 9 Bourbannais IL 60914

Robie House Bookshop 5757 S. Woodlawn Avenue Chicago IL 60637

Sawbridge Studios 153 West Ohio St. Chicago IL 60610

Sawbridge Studios 1015 TOWER RD Winnetka IL 60093

Schneider-Bluhm-Loeb Gallery 230 W. Superior Chicago IL 60610

SoTish 23 S. La Grange Rd.  La Grange IL 60525

The Art Stop 5 South La Grange Road La Grange IL 60525

Unusual Accents 3137 Dundee Rd. Northbrook IL 60062

Vale Craft Gallery 230 W. Superior St. Chicago IL 60610

Verve on Third 113 South Third Street Geneva IL 60134

Woodbine Glass Museum Rt. 20 Woodbine IL 61085

Woodstock Gallery 904 Green Bay Road Winnetka IL 60093

Aquarius Custom Jewelry 286 Island Drive Lowell IN 46356

Argentum Jewelry P. O. Box 1221 Bloomington IN 47402

Art Hand Crafts P. O. Box 123 Zionsville IN 46077

Art IN Hand Gallery 211 S. Main St. Zionsville IN 46077

Artifacts Gallery 6327 Guilford Ave. Indiana lis IN 46220

Artists' Den 203 Jefferson St. Valpariso IN 46383

Arts in Harmony 1488 East 86th Street Indianapolis IN 46236

Artworks Gallery 301 S. Walnut St. Ste 101 Muncie IN 47305

Details 8663 River Crossing Blvd. Indianapolis IN 46240

Heart to Heart Gallery 921 Ridge Rd Munster IN 46321

Lake Street Gallery 613 S. Lake Street Gary IN 46403

NIAA Gift Shop 1040 Ridge Road Munster IN 46321

Red Dot Gallery 6734 Dorchester Court Indianapolis IN 46214

Shimmery 1622 Santa Ana Ct. Munster IN 46321

The Stuart Group 100 East Main Nashville IN 47448

Trilogy Gallery 120 E. Main St. Nashville IN 47448

Baker Arts Center 624 N. Pershing Liberal KS 67901

Bearden's Stained Glass 7600 Metcalf Overland Park  KS 66204

Courtyard Gallery 125 N. Main St. Lindsborg KS 67456

Frame Woods Gallery 819 Massachusetts St. Lawrence KS 66044

Gallery at Hawthorne Plaza 4845 West 119th St. Overland Park KS 66209

Glass Expressions 1250 SW Oakley Ave #100 Topeka KS 66604

Harris Gallery South Hwy. 95 Elkhart KS 67950

Silver Works and More 715 Massachusetts St. Lawrence KS 66044

Tiger Lily 117 South Main St. Ulysses KS 67880

Adath Jeshurun 2401 Woodbrn Ave. Louisville KY 40205

Artique 410 W. Vine St. Lexington KY 40507

Edenside Gallery 1422 Bardstown Rd. Louisville KY 40204

Glassworks Gallery 815 West Market St. Louisville KY 40202

Heike Pickett Gallery 110 Morgan St. Versailles KY 40383

Home and Hearth Gallery 215 Adams St. Berea KY 40403

Huneysuckle Vine Broadway and Depot Berea KY 40403

Images 624 W. Main St. Louisville KY 40202

Lionheart Gallery 313 S. 4th St. Louisville KY 40202

Log House Craft Gallery Cpo 2145, Berea College Berea KY 40404

Loudoun House Gallery 209 Castlewood Drive Lexington KY 40505

Morris Fork Crafts 930 Morris Fork Road Booneville KY 41314

Museum American Quilter's 215 Jefferson St. Paducah KY 42002

Promenade Gallery 204 Center St. Berea KY 40403

Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill 3501 Lexington Road Harrodsburg KY 40330

Swanson Cralle Gallery 1377 Bardstown Rd. Louisville KY 40204

Vardens 509 Main St. Paris KY 40361

Anton Haardt Gallery 2858 Magazine St. New Orleans LA 70130

Ariodante Craft Gallery 535 Julia Street New Orleans LA 70130

Bedazzled 635 Saint Peter Street New Orleans LA 70116

Body Art 3414 Hessmer Ave. Metairie LA 70002

Caffery Gallery 4016 Government Street Baton Rouge LA 70806

Cezar Magi 234 Charres St. New Orleans LA 70130

Earthworks 1424 Ryan St. Lake Charles LA 70601

Interiors and Extras 324 Metairie Road Metairie LA 70005

Louisiana Pottery 6470 Hwy. 22 Sorrento LA 70778

Rhino Contemporary Crafts Co. 333 Canal St. Level 3 New Orleans LA 70130

Thomas Mann Gallery 1804 Magazine St. New Orleans LA 70130

Uniquely Yours 5827 Youree Drive Shreveport LA 71105

William and Joseph Gallery 713 Royal Street New Orleans LA 70116

Alianza 154 Newbury Street Boston MA 02116

Art Effects 10 Church St. Northborough MA 01532

Art of Framing 2 SOUTH MAIN ST. Middleton MA 01949

Artful Hand Gallery 36 Copley Place Boston MA 02116

Artful Image 16A Walden St. Concord MA 01742

Artisans Gallery 150 Main St. Northampton MA 01060

Bhadon Gallery 1075 Pleasant Street Worchester MA 01602

Busy Beaver Gift Shop 7 Brockton Avenue Abington MA 02351

By-the-Bay Designs 1073 Main Street Brewster MA 02631

Cambridge Artist Cooperative 59A Church Street Cambridge MA 02138

Ceruttis 373 Commercial St. Provincetown MA 02657

Choices  365 Boston Post Rd. Sudbury MA 01776

Choices Gallery 11 Pleasant Street Newbury Port MA 01950

Craftworks 102 Circuit Avenue Oak Bluffs MA 02557

Crafty Yankee, The 1838 Massachusetts Avenue Lexington MA 02173

DeCordova Museum Gift Shop 51 Sandy Pond Road Lincoln MA 01773

Divinity's Splendor-Glow 311 Broadway Arlington MA 02174

Don Muller Gallery 40 Main St Northampton MA 01060

Evergreen Contemporary Crafts 291 Main Street Great Barrington MA 01230

Fellerman & Raabe Glassworks 362 Shunpike Rd. Sheffield MA 01257

Ferrin Gallery 179 Main St. Northampton MA 01060

Fire Opal 7 Pond St. Jamaica Plain MA 02130

Fireburst R. F. D. #2 Orange MA 01364

Five Crows 8 Court St. Natick MA 01760

Frame-It Studio and Gallery 588 Randolf Avenue Milton MA 02186

Fruitlands Museum Store 102 Prospect Hill Road Harvard MA 01451

Glass Eye, The Main Street Mercantile North Eastham MA 02651

Grey Goose 95 Chapel Street Needham MA 02492

Habatat Galleries 117 State Road Route 7 Great Barrington MA 01230

Handcraft House 3966 Route 8A Brewster MA 02631

Handworks Gallery 161 Great Road Acton MA 01720

Hartstone Gallery 25 Washington Street Nonwell MA 02061

Holsten Galleries Elm Street Stockbridge MA 01262

Impulse 188 Commercial Street Provincetown MA 02657

Joie de Vivre 1792 Massachussetts Avenue Cambridge MA 02140

Jubilation 91 Union Street Newton MA 02159

Lacoste Gallery 25 Main St. Concord MA 01742

L'Attitude Gallery 218 Newbury St. Boston MA 02116

Left Bank Gallery 8 Cove Road Orleans MA 02653

Left Bank Gallery 3 West Main Street Wellfleet MA 02667

Light Hunter One Cottage Street East Hampton MA 01027

Limited Editions, Inc. 1176 Walnut Street Newton Highlan MA 02161

Muse's Window Gallery 1656 Massachusetts Ave. Lexington MA 02420

Museum of Fine Arts Boston Shop 465 Huntington Avenue Boston MA 02115

Ocmulgee Pottery and Fine Crafts 26 Market Street Ipswich MA 01938

Old Spouter Gallery 118 Orange St. Nantucket MA 02554

Old Sturbridge Village Museum Shop 1 Old Sturbridge Village Road Sturbridge MA 01566

Paper Tiger Inc P. O.B 1768 Vinyard Haven MA 02568

Ralph Jordan's 254 Great Rd. Acton MA 01720

Silverscape Designs 1 King Street Northhampton MA 01060

Skera Contemporary Crafts 221 Main St. Northampton MA 01060

Society of Arts and Crafts 175 Newbury St Boston MA 02118

Sparrow House Pottery 32 Summer Street Plymouth MA 02630

Spectrum of American Artists 369 Old Kings Highway Brewster MA 02631

Susi's Gallery For Children 348 Huron Ave. Cambridge MA 02138

Terra Firma 49 Leonard St. Belmont MA 02478

The Gatehouse 110 Commonwealth Ave. Concord MA 01742

The Gifted Hand 32 Church Street Wellesley MA 02482

The Navigator Shop 294 ELM ST. South Dartmouth MA 02748

The Potted Geranium 188 Main Street West Harwich MA 02671

The Silver Ribbon 15 Columbia Road Route 53 Pembroke MA 02359

The Wells Emporium 175 Merrrimack Street Lowell MA 01852

Valleries Gallery 12 State Street Newburyport MA 01950

Vinyard Lights 39 Circuit Ave Oak Bluffs MA 02557

W. O. W. 32 Needham St. Newton Highlands MA 02461

WA Gallery 184 Commercial St. Provincetown MA 02657

Walter Family Judaica Shop 125 Pond St. Sharon MA 02067

Wayside Gallery 512 Main Street Chatham  MA 02633

Whippoorwill Crafts 126 Market Blvd. Boston MA 02109

Wild Goose Chase 1431 Beacon St. Brookline MA 02446

Winstanley-Roark Fine Arts 601 Main St. Route 6A Dennis MA 02638

Worchester Center for Crafts 25 Sagamore Rd. Worcester MA 01605

Yankee Ingenuity 525 Main Street  Chatham  MA 02633

2910 on the Square 2910 O'Donnell Street Baltimore MD 21224

American Craftworks Collection 189 B. Main Street Annapolis MD 21401

Annapolis Pottery 40 State Circle Annapolis MD 21401

Appalachian Spring 1641 Rockville Rockville MD 20852

Artcraft Collection 8600 Foundry Street Savage MD 20763

As Kindred Spirits 1611 Rockville Pike Rockville MD 20852

Balcony Gallery 12 Broad St. Berlin MD 21811

Baltimore Clayworks Gallery 5707 Smith Ave. Baltimore MD 21209

Calico Cat 2137 Gywnn Oak Avenue Baltimore MD 21207

Craft Concepts Green Spring Station Lutherville MD 21093

Easy Street Gallery 8 Francis Street Annapolis MD 21401

Gallery 44 9469 Baltimore National Pike Ellicott City MD 21029

Gazelle 5100 Falls Road Baltimore MD 21210

Globe Theatre Gallery 12 Broad Street Berlin MD 21811

Hardwood Artisans 12266 Rockville Pike Rockville MD 20852

J Fish Studio and Fine Crafts P. O. Box 1218 Berlin MD 21811

Jurus Ltd. 5618 Newury Street Baltimore MD 21209

Kokopelli 1436 Columbia Mall Columbia MD 21044

La De Da 10126 River Rd. Potomac MD 20854

Main Street Gallery 486 Main Street Prince Frederick MD 20678

Meredith Gallery 805 North Charles Street Baltimore MD 21201

Mind's Eye Gallery 103 S. Talbot St. St. Michaels MD 21663

Mu d and Metal 813 W. 36th St. Baltimore MD 21211

Paper & Ink 3 No.Second St Woodsboro MD 21798

Paper Rock Scissors 1111 W. 36th St. Baltimore MD 21211

Red Orchard 10217 Old Georgetown Road Bethesda MD 20814

Rosenthal Collection, Inc. 4210 Howard Ave. Kensington MD 20895

Sansar 4805 Bethesda Ave. Bethesda MD 20814

Tomlinson Craft Collection 711 West 40th Street Baltimore MD 21211

Village Gem 4317 Ebenezer Road Baltimore MD 21236

Water From the Moon 217 Albemarle St. Baltimore MD 21202

Windrush Gallery 720 Morris Ave. Friendsville MD 21513

Zyzyx! 10301A Old Georgetown Rd. Bethesda MD 20814

ARTFX 49 West Street Annapolis MD  21401

Garden Architects 115 West St Annapolis MD  21403

National Gallery of Art Store 2000B South Club Drive Landover MD  20785

Abacus 44 Exchange Street Portland ME 04101

Bluen Heron Gallery 22 Church St. Deer Isle ME 04627

Compliments Dock Square, P. O. Box 567 A Kennebunkport ME 04046

Eclipse Gallery 12 Mount Desert St. Bar Harbor ME 04609

Edgecomb Potters 727 Boothbay Road Edgecomb ME 04556

Farnsworth Museum Store 16 Museum Street  Rockland ME 04841

Hole in the Wall Studioworks 1544 Roosevelt Trail Rte 302 Raymond ME 04071

Panache Gallery U. S. Route 1  Ogunquit ME 03907

Portland Museum of Art Store Seven Congress Square Portland ME 04101

Pottery By Celia Rt. 114, P. O. Box 4116 Naples ME 04055

Stein Gallery 195 Middle Street Portland ME 04101

Swamp John's Oamweed Road, Perkins Cove Ogunquit ME 03907

West Island Gallery 37 Bay Point Road Georgetown ME 04548

16 Hands Gallery 216 South Main Ann Arbor MI 48104

Ariana Gallery 119 S. Main Street Royal Oak MI 48067

Biddle Gallery 2840 Biddle Avenue Wyandotte MI 48192

Bier Art Gallery 17959 Ferry Rd. Charlevoix MI 49720

Castle Park Gallery 8 East 8th Street Holland MI 49423

Czarina's Treasure 403 Water St., Box 1168 Saugatuck MI 49453

Detroit Gallery of Contemp. Craft 104 Fisher Building Detroit MI 48202

Elements 107 Bridge Street Charlevoix MI 49720

EUC Gallery 812 Saginaw Street Bay City MI 48708

Gallery on the Alley 611 Broad Street St. Joseph MI 49085

Good Goods 106 Mason St. Saugatuck MI 49453

Harbor Muse 19135 W. US 12 New Buffalo MI 49117

John McMartin Jewelry Arts Gallery 440 N. Main Milford MI 48381

Le Flair 5763 28th St. SE Grand Rapids MI 49546

Les Sirena Galerie D'Art 338 S. Main St. Frankfort MI 49635

Mackerel Sky Gallery 217 Ann St East Lansing MI 48823

Margot's Gallery and Frame 5 South Washington Oxford MI 48371

Moynihan Gallery & Framing, Inc. 28 East 8th Street Holland MI 49423

Mullay's 128 Studio & Gallery 128 River Street Box 5 Elk Rapids MI 49629

Northwood Gallery 144 E. Main Midland MI 48640

Novus Art Gallery 15200 E. Jefferson Ave. Grosse Pointe Park MI 48230

Saginaw Art Museum 1126 N. Michigan Ave Saginaw MI 48602

Sandra Collins Gallery 1114 Lakeside Dr. Birmingham MI 48009

Selo/Shevel Gallery 301 S Main St Ann Arbor MI 48104

Silver Crow 201 S. Front Street Marquette MI 49855

The Muse, a Fine Craft Gallery 408 S. Main Street Plymouth MI 48170

The Secret Garden 4321 Cherry Hill Dr. Empire MI 48864

Twisted Fish Gallery 10284 S. Bayshore Dr. Elk Rapids MI 49629

Whistling Moose Gallery 273 East Main St. Harbor Springs MI 49740

Yaw Gallery 550 N. Woodward Ave. Birmingham MI 48009

Bibelot Shops, The 1082 Grand Avenue St. Paul MN 55105

Douglass Baker Gallery 601 2nd Ave S. #100A Minneapolis MN 55402

Gallery at the Clay Coyote 17614 240th Street Hutchinson MN 55350

Judith McGrann and Friends 4615 Exceksuir Blvd Minneapolis MN 55416

Lizzards II 36 East Superior St. Duluth MN 55802

Mealey's Gift 124 N. Central Ave. Ely MN 55731

Minneapolis Institute of the Arts Shop 2400 Third Avenue South Minneapolis MN 55404

Northern Clay Centery 2424 Franklin Ave. East Minneapolis MN 55406

Recollections from the Inn 14709 Maple Inn Road SE Mentor MN 56736

Rourke Art Gallery 523 South Fourth St. Moorehead MN 56560

SEMVA Art Gallery 16 First St. SW Rochester MN 55902

Steppingstone Gallery 50 Main Street South Hutchinson MN 55350

Three Rooms Up 3505 GALLERIA Edina MN 55435

Walker Art Center Store 725 Vineland Place Minneapolis MN 55403

Americana Gallery Corner of Walnut & Ferry Street Augusta MO 63332

Art St. Louis Craft Gallery 917 Locust St. St. Louis MO 63101

Barucci Gallery 8101 Maryland Avenue St. Louis MO 63105

Craft Alliance 6640 Delmar Blvd. St. Louis MO 63130

Eclectics Gallery 7015 Oak St. Kansas City MO 64113

Gallery North 2105 Burlington North Kansas City MO 64116

Kemper Museum of Contemp. Art 4420 Warwick Blvd. Kansas City MO 64111

Limited Additions 2644 Metro Blvd. Maryland Heights MO 63043

Lisa Frick Gallery 2840 Bus. Hwy 54 Lake Ozark MO 65049

Michael Anton Bruckdorfer Walnut and Ferry Streets Augusta MO 63332

Poppy 914 East Broadway Columbia MO 65201

Small Indulgences 1045 South Big Bend Boulevard St. Louis MO 63117

Tobiason Studio 515 Felix St. Joseph MO 64501

Waverly House Gifts/Gallery 2031 S. Waverly Springfield MO 65804

A Gallery 512 Main Street Hattiesburg MS 39401

Baycrafts 107 North Beach Blvd. Bay St. Louis MS 39520

Chimneyville Crafts Gallery 1150 Lakeland Drive Jackson MS 39216

Goldring Instite Gift Shop P. O. Box 16528 Jackson MS 39236

Hillyer House 207 East Scenic Avenue Pass Christian MS 39571

Southern Breeze Gallery 4500 1-55 North Ste. 160 Jackson MS 39211

Southside Gallery 150 Courthouse Square Oxford MS 38655

Artworks Gallery 123 West Main St. Bozeman MT 59715

Basin Creek Pottery and Gallery 82 E. Basin St. Basin  MT 59631

Noice Studio and Gallery 127 Main St. Kalispell MT 59901

Riecke's Bayside Gallery 482 Electric Ave. Bigfork MT 59911

Sutton West Gallery 121 West Broadway Missoula MT 59101

Toucan Gallery 2505 Montana Ave. Billings MT 59101

2Sisters Gallery 2002 New Garden Road Greensboro NC 27410

Accipiter 2046 Clark Ave.S Raleigh NC 27605

Alta Vista 2839 Broadstone Rd. Valle Crucis NC 28691

American Folk 64 Biltmore Ave. Asheville NC 28801

Bellagio 7 Boston Way Asheville NC 28803

Blue Heron Gallery 1780-10A Chandlers Lane Sunset Beach NC 28468

Blue Moon Gallery 1387 Highway 705 S.  Seagrove NC 27341

Blue Spiral One 38 Biltmore Avenue Asheville NC 28801

Browning Artworks Ltd P. O. Box 275 Frisco NC 27936

Carolina Creations 321 Pollock Street New Bern NC 28560

Carolina Moon P. O. Box 1060, Nags Head Stn Nags Head NC 27959

Cedar Creek Gallery 1150 Fleming Road Creedmoor NC 27522

City Art Works PMB 315  7804 Fairview Rd. Charlotte NC 28226

Continuity, Inc P. O. Box 999, Market Square Maggie Valley NC 28751

Crabtree Meadows Store Milespost #339 Little Switzerland NC 28749

Earthworks 21 N. Main St. Waynesville NC 28786

Favorite Designs P. O. Box 467 Mebane NC 27302

Fine Lines 304 South Stratford Road Winston-Salem NC 27103

Gallery Mia Tyson 217 N. Front Street Wilmington NC 28401

Gallery of the Mountains 290 Macon Avenue Asheville NC 28814

Greenleaf Gallery 6917 S. Croatan Hwy. Nags Head NC 27959

Grovewood Gallery 111 Grovewood Road Asheville NC 28805

Hands Craft Gallery 542 W. King St. Boone NC 28607

Handscapes Gallery 410 Front Street Beaufort NC 28516

Jewels That Dance 63 Haywood Street Asheville NC 28801

Julia Rush Fine Crafts 216 Union Square Hickory NC 28601

Lick Log Mill Store 4321 Dillard Road  S. R. 106 Highlands NC 28741

Little Art Gallery 432 Daniels Street Center Raleigh NC 27605

Maddi's Gallery 1530 East Boulevard Charlotte NC 28203

Midland Crafters 2176 Midland Rd. P. O. Box 100 Pinehurst NC 28370

Mint Museum Shop 220 North Tryon Street Charlotte NC 28202

Moondance Gallery 603 Meadowmont Village Circle Chapel Hill NC 27517

Morning Glory 102 Caledon Ct. Greenville NC 29615

New Elements Gallery 216 North Front Street Wilmington NC 28401

New Morning Gallery 7 Boston Way Asheville NC 28803

Ocean Annie' 815A Ocean Trail Corolla NC 27927

Peak Experience P. O. Box 834 Highlands NC 28741

Red Sky Gallery 4705 Savings PL #108 Charlotte NC 28210

Sandy Bay Gallery Highway 12, P. O. Box 538 Hatteras NC 27943

Seven Sisters Gallery 117 Cherry Street Black Mountain NC 28711

Silent Poetry 120 West Main Street Burnsville NC 28714

Silver Bonsai Gallery 905 Hwy. 64 East Manteo NC 27954

Skillbeck Gallery 248 South Sharon Amity Road Charlotte NC 28211

SOLO Art Gallery 33 Miller St. Winston-Salem NC 27104

Somerhill Gallery 3 Eastgate, E. Franklin St. Chapel Hill NC 27514

Southern Hands 1 Wright Square P. O. Box 1827 Highlands NC 28741

Spectrum Gallery 1121-B Military Cutoff Road Wilmington NC 28405

Stewart's Village Gallery 116 McDonald St. Waxhaw NC 28173

Summit One Gallery 4152 Cashiers Road, Hwy 64 Highlands NC 28741

Twigs & Leaves Craft Gallery 98 North Main Street Waynesville NC 28786

Twisted Laurel Gallery 333 Locust Ave. Spruce Pine NC 28777

Village Galleries Arts and Crafts Historic Biltmore Village Asheville NC 28803

Vitrum Gallerie 10 Lodge Street Asheville NC 28803

Wickwire Fine Art/Folk Art 330 North Main Street Hendersonville NC 28792

Wildwoods Gallery 1345 Poplar Grove Rd. South Boone NC 28607

Wilkes Art Gallery 913 C St. North Wilkesboro NC 28659

Artsplace 1110 Second Ave. North Grand Forks ND 58203

Latitudes Gallery, Framing & Gifts 107 N. Fifth St. Bismarck ND 58501

ND Museum of Art Gift Store P. O. Box 7305 Grand Forks ND 58202

Spirit Room Gallery 111 Broadway Fargo ND 58102

Artists' Cooperative Gallery 405 South 11th St. Omaha NE 68102

Borsheim's 120 Regency Pkwy. Omaha NE 68114

Noyes Art Gallery 119 South Ninth St. Lincoln NE 68508

Strategic Air Museum Store 28210 West Park Highway Ashland NE 68003

White Crane Gallery 1032 Howard Street Omaha NE 68102

ARTISAN'S WORKSHOP P. O.B 124 New London NH 03257

Casual Cat 112 Rte. 101A Amherst NH 03031

Cordwainer Gallery 176 Rt. 101 Bedford NH 03110

Country Artisans 53 Main St. Keene NH 03431

Detailed Stained Glass 51 South Main Street Concord NH 03301

Finn and Co. 29 Congress St. Portsmouth NH 03801

gallery 205 205 N. Main St. Concord NH 03301

N.W.Barrett Gallery 53 Market St Portsmouth NH 03801

NJM Gallery 57 Bow Street Portsmouth NH 03801

North Gallery at Tewksbury RR101 Peterborough NH 03458

Oglethorpe Fine Arts & Crafts 312 D.W. Highway, Ste.#3 Meredith NH 03253

Pierce Designs 41 Glen Road West Lebanon NH 03784

Worldly Goods 37 Congress Street Portsmouth NH 03801

Yikes! American Craft Gallery Main Street and Route 25 Center Harbor NH 03226

A Mano Galleries 36 North Union St. Lambertville NJ 08530

Accent Gallery 956 Ashbury Avenue Ocean City NJ 08226

Accent Studio 207 Kings Hwy E. Haddonfield NJ 08033

American Craft Gallery 163 South St. Morristown NJ 07960

Armadillo 31 West 22nd Street Avalon  NJ 08202

Arrivee 15 Broad Street Red Bank NJ 07701

Beautiful Things 1038 East Second Street Scotch Plains NJ 07076

Bloom's 114 Raritan Ave. Highland Park NJ 08904

Blue Tulip 100 Overlook Center 2nd Floor Princeton NJ 08540

By Hand Fine Craft Gallery 142 Kings Highway East Hardonfield NJ 08033

Capital City Craft Studio 117 South Warren Street Trenton NJ 08608

Catch the Wind 23 South Main Street Medford NJ 08055

CBL Fine Art 459 Pleasant Valley Way West Orange NJ 07052

Church Door Gallery P. O. Box 207/ 103 Philhower Ave Califon NJ 07830

Dexterity, Ltd. 26 Church Street Montclair NJ 07042

Drew Chryst Gallery 14 Winona Parkway Sparta NJ 07871

Eco Galleria 500 Cedar Lane Teaneck NJ 07666

Frick and Frack 1480 Route 23 North Wayne NJ 07470

Frog Hollow Gallery 31 Maple St. Summit NJ 07901

Gallery of American Craft 1501 Glasstown Rd. Millville NJ 08332

Grey Dove, The 159 South Livingston Avenue Livingston NJ 07039

Horsefeathers West 200 E. Ridgewood Ave Ridgewood NJ 07450

Jewel Spiegel Gallery 30 North Dean Street Englewood NJ 07631

Kornbluth Gallery 7-21 Fairlawn Ave. Fair Lawn NJ 07410

Limited Editions 2200 Long Beach Blvd. Surf City NJ 08008

Louisa Melrose Gallery 41 Bridge Street Frenchtown NJ 08825

Masterpiece Craft Gallery 968 Route 73 South Marlton NJ 08053

Michael Roth & Co. 67 Nassau St Clark NJ 07066

N. K. Thaine Gallery 150 Kings Highway East Haddonfield NJ 08033

Oceanside Gallery 1010 Main Street Belmar NJ 07719

Off the Wall Craft Gallery 42 S. Main Box 128 Allentown NJ 08501

Ooh La La 13211 Long Beach Blvd. Beach Haven NJ 08008

Peters Valley Craft Store 19 Kuhn Rd Layton NJ 07851

Quest 50 Main St. Chester NJ 07930

Ru Crafts P. O. Box 4352 Cherry Hill  NJ 08034

Solaris Gallery P. O. Box 522/56 Main Street Califon NJ 07830

The Flying Carp 743 Ashbury Ave. Ocean City NJ 08226

The Mendham Art Gallery 13 West Main Street Mendham NJ 07945

The Quest 38 MAIN ST Chester NJ 07930

Trendz-OT & Company 209 96th Street Stone Harbor NJ 08247

Wheaton Village The Gallery of American Craft Millville NJ 08332

Wheaton Village Museum of Glass 1501 Glasstown Rd. Millville NJ 08332

Wortendyke Gallery 211 Greenwood Ave. Midland Park NJ 07432

Zecca Gallery 450 Main Street Metuchen NJ 08840

Zephyr Gallery The Market Fair, 3535 US Rte 1 Princeton NJ 08540

Abiquin Inn P.O. Box 120 Abiquiu NM 87510

Arlene Siegel Gallery 102 East Water St. Santa Fe NM 87501

Bryans Gallery 121 Kit Carson Rd. Taos NM 87571

Casa de Avila 5001 Ellison NE Albuquerque NM 87109

Chalk Farm Gallery 330 Old Santa Fe Trail Santa Fe NM 87501

Desert Star 2044 South Plaza Albuquerque NM 87102

Georgia O'Keefe Museum Shop 217 Johnson Street Santa Fe NM 87501

Karen Melfi Collection 225 Canyon Rd. Santa Fe NM 87501

Las Comadres Gallery 228A Paseo del Pueblo Norte Taos NM 87571

Lew Allen Contemporary 129 W. Palace Ave. Santa Fe NM 87501

M.S. Franco Gallery 1107 S. First St. Clayton NM 88415

Mariposa Gallery 3500 Central Ave. SE Albuquerque NM 87106

Millicent Rogers Museum Gift Shop Millicent Rogers Museum Rd. Taos NM 87571

Ortega's On The Plaza 101 W. San Francisco St. Santa Fe NM 87501

Patina Gallery 131 West Palace Avenue Santa Fe NM 87501

Purple Sage 110 Don Gaspar Santa Fe NM 87501

Santa Fe Pottery 323 S. Guadeloupe St. Santa Fe NM 87501

Santa Fe Weaving Gallery 124 1/2 Galisteo Santa Fe NM 87501

Shidoni Gallery Bishop Lodge Rd. Tesuque NM 87574

Southwest Mercado Gallery 121 Romero NW Albuquerque NM 87104

Susan Wilder Gallery 119 Kit Carson Rd. Taos NM 87571

The Rare Vision Gallery 2935 D Louisiana, N E Albuquerque NM 87110

The Taos Company 124 John Dunn/Bent St. Taos NM 87571

Thirteen Moons Gallery 652 Canyon Road  Santa Fe NM 87501

Variant Gallery 135 North Plaza Taos NM 87571

Weaving Southwest 216B Pueblo Norte Taos NM 87571

Weyrich Gallery 2935-D Louisiana Blvd. N.E. Albuquerque NM 87110

Fiddlesticks 1229 Arizona St. Boulder City NV 89005

Gene Speck's Silver State Gallery 719 Plumas St. Reno NV 89509

Infinite Ideas 527 California Ave Reno NV 89509

Just Write 8050 W. Charleston #108 Las Vegas NV 89117

Mandalay Bay Resort 3950 Las Vegas Blvd South Las Vegas NV 89119

Paper and Gold Gallery Ceasar's Tahoe Hotel and Casino Stateline NV 89449

Richardson Gallery of Fine Art 3670 S. Virginia St. Reno NV 89502

15 Steps 171 The Commons Ithaca NY 14850

Aaron Faber Gallery 666 5th Ave. New York NY 10019

Adirondack Artworks Route 3, Box 324 Natural Bridge NY 13665

Adirondack Craft Center 93 Saranac Ave Lake Placid  NY 12946

Adrein Linford 1320 Madison Avenue New York City NY 10128

Albright-Knox Gallery 1285 Elmwood Avenue Buffalo NY 14222

Altamira 541 Main St. Islip NY 11751

American Artisan 790 Seventh Ave. New York NY 10019

American Craft Museum Shop 40 West 53rd. St. New York NY 10019

An American Craftsman P. O. Box 480 Slate Hill NY 10973

Ann Kolb Gallery 46 Mian Street East Hampton NY 11937

Artcrafters Gallery 472 Elmwood Avenue Buffalo NY 14222

Artisans Alley 1897 W. River Rd. Grand Island NY 12072

Brooklyn Artisans Gallery 221A Court St. Brooklyn NY 11201

Brooklyn Museum of Art Store 200 Eastern Parkway Brooklyn NY 11238

Clay Pot 162 7th Ave. Brooklyn NY 11215

Clouds Gallery 1Mill Hill Rd. Woodstock NY 12498

Craft Company No. 6 785 University Ave. Rochester NY 14607

Crafts People 262 Spillway Road West Hurley NY 12491

Creative Spirit 5111 Route 213 Olivebridge NY 12461

Creator's Hands, The 336 Arnett Boulevard Rochester NY 14619

Cross Harris Fine Crafts 45 E. 72nd St. #3C New York NY 10021

Designers Studio 492 Broadway Saratoga Sprin NY 12866

Dr. Livingston's Finds 234 Broadway #2 Monticello NY 12701

Eclectic Collector 215 Katonah Ave Katonah NY 10536

Enchanted Forest, The P. O. Box 20215 New York NY 10014

Eureka Crafts 210 Walton St. Syracuse NY 13202

For Decor 1458 Plum Lane East Meadow NY 11554

Freewheel Pottery, The 7 Tinker Street Woodstock NY 12498

Gallery M 308A Main St. Greenport NY 11944

Galmer Silversmiths 5-19 47th Ave Long Island City NY 11101

Garth Clark Gallery 24 West 57 St. New York NY 10019

Goldsmith, The 49 Court Street Binghampton NY 13901

Guggenheim Museum Store 1071 Fifth Avenue (at 89th Street) New York NY 10128

Hand of Man Main Street Old Forge NY 13420

Handcrafters, The 57 Main Street Chatham NY 12037

Handmade and More 6 North Front Street New Paltz NY 12561

Handwork 102 West State Street Ithaca NY 14850

Hudson Valley Arts Center 337 Warren St. Hudson NY 12534

Imagine 8 East Genesee Street Skaneateles NY 13152

Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum Pier 86 12th Ave and 46th Street  New York NY 10036

Jenss 4230C Ridge Lea Road Ste.1 Amherst NY 14226

Judaica Art Is…. 80-12 Surrey Place Jamaica Estates NY 11432

Julie's Artisan's Gallery 762 Madison Ave. New York NY 10021

Kate's Paperie 561 Broadway New York NY 10012

Klay Gallery 65 South Broadway Nyack NY 10960

Landing Gallery 71 East Main Street Smithtown NY 11787

Lee Gallery 49 Main St. Southhampton NY 11968

Loveed Assoc. 575 Madison Avenue New York NY 10022

Metropolitan Museum of Art Store 1000 Fifth Avenue at 82nd Street New York NY 10028

Mill Cottage Gallery Main St. Rensselaerville NY 12147

Moon Tree Design 22 Main St Lake Placid NY 12946

Museum Of Jewish Heritage 18 First Pl. New York NY 10280

Museum of Modern art Store 11 W. 53rd Street New York NY 10019

NCH Studio 201 Court Street Brooklyn NY 11201

Northport Crafters Gallery 106 Main Street Northport NY 11768

Offerings 59 Katonah Ave. Katonah NY 10536

Originals 582 Westbury Ave. Carle Place NY 11514

Sedoni Gallery 304-A New York Ave. Huntington NY 11743

Surroundings Art Gallery 73 East Main St. Westfield NY 14787

SweetHeart Gallery 8 Tannery Brook Road Woodstock NY 12498

SYMMETRY 348 BROADWAY Saratoga Springs NY 12866

Temple Beth Am Gift Shop 4660 Sheridan Drive Williamsville NY 14221

The AptGallery.com, Inc. 900 West End Avenue New York City NY 10025

The Collector 2067 Merrick Rd.  Merrick NY 11566

The Eclectic Collector 215 Katonah Ave. Katonah NY 10536

The Gift Cupboard 104 Lafayette Avenue Suffern NY 10901

The Painted Garden 4138 Lakeville Groveland Rd Geneseo NY 14454

The River Gallery 39 Main Street Irvington NY 10533

Union Square Ceramic Center 7 East 17th Street 8th floor New York NY 10003

Whitney Mus. of American Art Store 945 Madison Avenue at 75th St. New York NY 10021

Cameo Gallery 772 North High Street Columbus OH 43215

Century House of Glendale 3 Village Square Cincinatti OH 45246

Cleveland Museum of Art Store 11150 East Boulevard Cleveland OH 44106

Creative Elements Furniture Studio 24186 Front St. Grand Rapids  OH 43522

Don Drumm Studios and Gallery 437 Crouse St. Akron OH 44311

Finishing Touch Gallery 115 S Front Street Fremont  OH 43420

Fiori-Omni Gallery 2072 Murray Hill Rd. Cleveland OH 44106

Gallery 143 1840 Town Park Blvd. Uniontown OH 44685

Gallery in the Vault 105 E. Liberty St. Wooster OH 44691

Ginko Gallery & Studio 19 South Main Street Oberlin OH 44074

Harris Stanton Gallery 2301 W. Market St. Akron OH 44313

Helen Winnemores 150 E Kossuth St Columbus OH 43206

Lazar's Art Gallery 2940 Woodlawn Ave. Canton OH 44708

Murray Hill Art & Craft 2188 Murray Hill Road Cleveland OH 44106

Off The Wall-Ohio 26450 Bernwood Road Cleveland OH 44122

Ohio Historical Society Store 1982 Velma Ave. Columbus  OH 43211

PM Gallery 726 N. High St. Columbus OH 43215

Rutlage Gallery 1964 N. Main St. Dayton OH 45402

Standing Rock Gallery 5194 Darrow Road Hudson OH 44236

Taft Museum of Art Store 316 Pike Street Cincinnati OH 45202

The American Gallery 6600 Sylvania Ave. Sylvania OH 43560

The Sassy Cat 88 N. Main St. Chagrin Falls OH 44022

Verne Collection 2207 Murray Hill Rd. Cleveland OH 44106

Zig Zag Gallery 101 E. Alex Bell Rd. #172 Dayton OH 45459

American Furnishings 1409 West 3rd Avenue Columbus  OH  43212

Bebe's 6480 Avondale/Nichols Hills Pl. Oklahoma City OK 73116

Eleanor Kirkpatrick Gallery 3000 General Pershing Blvd. Oklahoma City OK 73107

Firehouse Art Center 444 S. Flood Ave. Norman OK 73069

Gallery 107 107 North Main Street Sand Springs OK 74063

M. A. Doran Gallery 3509 South Peoria Tulsa OK 74105

Shop Oklahoma.com 9428 E. 114th St. S. Bixby OK 74008

Terra Bijou 201 West Oklahoma #234 Guthrie OK 73044

Tribes Gallery 307 E. Main St. Norman OK 73069

Ashland Harwood Gallery 17 North Main St. Ashland OR 97520

Breach the Moon Gallery 434 SW Bay Blvd Newport OR 97365

Bullseye Connection Glass Gallery 300 NW Thirteenth Ave. Portland OR 97209

Butters Gallery 520 N.W. Davis Portland OR 97209

Contempory Crafts Gallery 3934 SW Corbett Ave. Portland OR 97201

Faith Mountain Art Gallery 50095 Highway 25 John Day OR 97845

Forrest Gallery 10767 Butte St. NE Aurora OR 97002

Freed Gallery 6119 S.W. Highway 101 Lincoln City OR 97367

Gallery 33 1400 NW Everett St. Portland OR 97209

Hoffman Gallery Shop 8245 SW Barnes Rd. Portland OR 97225

Illahe Tileworks Studio 695 Mistletoe Rd. #F Ashland OR 97520

La Bella Casa 121 NE 5th Street Mcminnville OR 97128

Lawrence Gallery Box 187, Hwy. 18 Sheridan OR 97378

Mary Lou Zeek Gallery 335 State Street Salem OR 97301

Mole Hole 11787 SW Beaverton Beaverton OR 97005

Nimbus 25 East Main Street Ashland OR 97520

Oceanic Arts  444 SW Bay Blvd Newport  OR 97365

Rare Discovery 148 N. Hemlock Box 1000 Cannon Beach OR 97110

Real Mother Goose 901 S.W. YAMHILL Portland OR 97205

Salem Art Association 600 Mission St. S.E. Salem OR 97302

Soaring Crane Gallery 33105 Cape Kiwanda Dr. Pacific City OR 97135

Sticks and Stones 512 Cascade Avenue Hood River OR 97031

Sunbird Gallery Inc. 916 N.W. Wall St. Bend OR 97701

The Real Mother Goose 901 S W Yamhill Portland OR 97205

Triad Gallery 5667 NW Highway 101 Seal Rock OR 97376

Twisted Laurel Gallery 30 NW 23rd Pl. Portland OR 97210

White Bird Gallery Box 502 No. Hemlock St. Cannon Beack OR 97110

Widney Moore Gallery 202 NW 13th Ave Portland Or 97209

Wood Gallery 818 S.W. Bay Blvd. Newport OR 97365

20th Century Glass, Pottery 23 Phillip Drive Kirkwood PA 17536

A Mano Gallery 128 South Main Street New Hope PA 18938

Accents & Images Peddler's Village Route 263 Lahaska PA 18931

AIA Bookstore 117 South 17th St.  Philadelphia PA 19103

Allegheny Country 503 Anderson Road Schellsburg PA 15559

Ambitious Endeavors 11 Union Avenue Bala Cynwyd PA 19004

American Pie 327 South Street Philadelphia PA 19147

An American Gallery 101 E. Pittsburg St. Greensburg PA 15601

Antiques and Handcrafts 1712 Chester Road  Bethlehem PA 18017

Art Effects Gallery 350 Montgomery Ave Merian PA 19066

Artery 210 Broad St. Milford PA 18337

Artisans Gallery Box 133 Peddlers Village Lahaska PA 18931

Artisans Three The Village Center Spring House PA 19477

Baubles and Beads 25 West King Street Lancaster PA 17603

Black Cat, The 3424 Sansom Street Philadelphia PA 19104

Boutique To Go 1119 Bell Ave Allentown PA 18103

Box Heart Gallery 4523 Liberty Ave. Pittsburgh PA 15224

Campbell Pottery Gallery 25579 Plank Road P. O. Box 246 Cambridge Springs PA 16403

Cenzia Arts and Gifts 121 West State Street Kennett Square PA 19348

Chestnut House 25 W. King Street Lancaster PA 17603

Circa 2000-Fine American Crafts 2932 Conestoga Road Glenmoore PA 19343

Clay Place, The 5416 Walnut Street Pittsburg PA 15232

Cleo's Silversmith Gallery 21 E. Third Street Bethlehem PA 18015

Creative Hands P. O. Box 284 Furlong PA 18925

Dandelion 6609 Springbank Street Philadelphia PA 19119

Design Interiors 134 West Main St. Leola PA 17540

Douglas Albert Gallery 107 McAlister Alley Walkway State College PA 16801

DragonFly Gallery 29 South High St. West Chester PA 19382

Earth and State 23 W. State St. Media PA 19063

Earthworks Pa 233 Haverford Ave Narberth PA 19072

Equinox Jewelry and Gifts 120 West State St. Kennett Square PA 19348

From the Heart 105 Pine Haven Drive Somerset PA 15501

G Squared Gallery & Gardens 212 E Main St. Ligonier PA 15658

Galan 100 Evergreen Dr. #113 Glen Mills PA 19380

Gallerie 500 3205 Scotts Lane Ste 303 Philadelphia PA 19129

Gallery 61 1380 Pottsville Pike Shoemakersville PA 19555

Gallery At Cedar Hollow 2447 Yellow Springs Rd. Malvern PA 19355

Gallery at Forest Hall 101 West Hartford Street Milford PA 18337

Gallery at Liztech 95 Crystal St. 1st Floor East Stroudsburg PA 18301

Gallery Chiz 5831 Ellsworth Ave. Pittsburgh PA 15232

Golden Fish Gallery 307 Broad Street Milford PA 18337

Hearts Afire 28 South Main Street New Hope PA 18938

Home and Garden Culture 908 East Baltimore Pike Kennett Square PA 19348

J R Weldon Company 415 Wood Street  Pittsburgh PA 15222

Jewish Cntr. Little Shop 400 W. Ellet St. Philadelphia PA 19119

Keller Charles 2413 Federal Street Philadelphia PA 19146

Langman Gallery Willow Grove Park # 1118 Willow Grove PA 19090

Latitudes Gallery 4325 Main Street Philadelphia PA 19127

Lavender Rose 317 South State Street Newtown PA 18940

LL Pavorsky Jewels and Gifts 707 Walnut Street Philadelphia PA 19106

Magpie Gallery 400 Market St. Lewisburg PA 17837

Mark Williams, Goldsmith 111 West 3rd Street Williamsport PA 17701

Morgan Contemp. Glass Gallery 5833 Ellsworth Ave Pittsburgh PA 15232

Otter Creek Store, The 106 South Diamond Street Mercer PA 16137

Our American Heritage 17114 East Lancaster Avenue Paoli PA 19301

Owen/Patrick Gallery 4345 Main Street Philadelphia PA 19127

Pennsylvania Museum Store 3260 South Street Philadelphia PA 19104

Philadelphia Art Museum 26th & Parkway Philadelphia PA 19101

Philadelphia Museum of Art Store Benjamin Pkwy and 26th Street Philadelphia PA 19130

Pittsburgh Center for the Arts 6300 Fifth Ave. Pittsburgh PA 15232

Route 5 380 Wayne Avenue Chambersburg PA 17201

Show of Hands 1006 Pine Street Philadelphia PA 19107

Simple Pleasures 22 South High St. West Chester PA 19382

Sisterhood Gift Shop 944 Second St. Pike Richboro PA 18954

Snyderman Gallery 303 Cherry St. Philadelphia PA 19106

SOTA Spirit of the Artist 1022 Pine St. Philadelphia PA 19107

Susan's Treasures W. S. Farmers Market #8 Upstairs Lemoyne PA 17043

The Works 303 Cherry St. Philadelphia PA 19106

This Little Gallery 617 West Ave Jenkintown PA 19046

Topeo Gallery 35 N Main St New Hope PA 18938

Turning Point Gallery 34 West State St. Media PA 19063

Unique by Design 1000 Mansion View West Chester PA 19382

Village Artisans Gallery 321 Walnut Street Boiling Springs PA 17007

Vitetta 4747 S. Broad Street Philadelphia PA 19112

William Ris Gallery 2208 Market Street  Camp Hill PA 17011

Woodburners 11 North Market St. Hatfield PA 19440

Youghiogheny Glass 900 W. Crawford Connellsville PA 15425

Collaga 25 Bowens Wharf Newport RI 02840

Juleez Artique's 10 Phillips Street Wickford RI 02852

Mixed Media Box 271 Block Island RI 02807

OOP! contemporary gift gallery 297 Thayer St. Providence RI 02906

Sun Up Gallery 95 Watch Hill Road Westerly RI 02891

American Originals Gallery 153 East Bay Street Charleston SC 29401

ArtWare 1203A Main Street Village Hilton Head SC 29926

Carol Saunders Gallery 922 Gervais Street Columbia SC 29201

Clay Works Gallery 285 Meeting House Rd. Charleston SC 29401

Llyn Strong 119 North Main St. Greenville SC 29601

Michael McDunn Gallery 741 Rutherford Rd. Greenville SC 29609

Nash Gallery 2 H Harbourside Hilton Head  SC 29928

Portfolio Art Gallery  2007 Devine St. Columbia SC 29205

Smith Galleries Village at Wexfort Ste. J-11 Hilton Head SC 29928

Bear Rock Art RR-1 Box 19-A Custer SD 57730

Prarie Edge 606 Main St. Rapid City SD 57701

American Artisan 4231 Harding Rd. Nashville TN 37205

Atelier 8400 Highway 100 Nashville TN 37221

Babcock Gifts P. O. Box 241028 Memphis TN 38124

Bennett Gallery 5308 Kingston Pike Knoxville TN 37919

Enchanted Décor 41 W. Broad St. Cookeville TN 38501

Finer Things Gallery 1898 Nolenville Rd. Nashville TN 37210

Hanson Gallery 5607 Kingston Pike Knoxville TN 37919

James-Ben: Studio and Gallery 129 North Main ST. Greenvile TN 37743

Jay Etkin Gallery 409 South Main St. Memphis TN 38103

Jonesborough Art Glass Gallery 101 E. Main St. Jonesborough TN 37659

Liz-Beth & Co.  9211 Park West Boulevard Knoxville TN 37923

Nouveau Classics 2104 Crestmoor Rd. Nashville TN 37215

River Gallery 400 Second Street Chattanooga TN 37403

River Gallery-Tennessee 400 East Second Street Chattanooga TN 37403

Signature Designs 508 South Main Street #101 Memphis TN 38103

Spirit of the Hand 545 E. Meeting St. Dandridge TN 37725

Twisted Vessel Contemporary Craft 3335 Old Mill St. Pigeon Forge TN 37863

Allie - Coosh 6726 Snider Plaza Dallas TX 75205

Art Alley 14072 Memorial Dr. Houston  TX 77079

Art in the City 3601 W. Alabama, Suite 101 Houston TX 77027

Artistic Home P. O. Box 1209 Crosby TX 77532

Artworks 1214 West 6th St. Austin TX 78703

Ashley Averys 12707 North Fwy Ste 330 Houston  TX 77060

Austin Presence 3736 Beecave Road #5 Austin TX 78746

Carlyn Galerie 6137 Luther Lane Dallas TX 75225

Center Gallery 300 Augusta San Antonio TX 78205

Clarksville Pottery and Galleries 4001 N. Lamar Austin TX 78756

Dreidels 1465 West Campbel Road Richardson TX 75080

Escape 713 Main St. Georgetown TX 78626

Gallery Vetro! Creative Art Glass 600 North Presa St. San Antonio TX 78205

Great Ideas 3144 Oak Hills Rd Carollton TX 75007

Gregory's P. O.B 588/ 2 Main St Saledo TX 76571

Hanson Galleries 1101-10 Uptown Park Blvd. Houston  TX 77056

Hill Country Weavers 1701 South Congress Austin TX 78704

Illuminata 700 Town & Cntry Blvd. Ste.2460 Houston TX 77024

J Matthias Galleries 3739 FM 1960 Road West Houston  TX 77068

Kittrell/Riffkind Art Glass 5100 Beltline Road #820 Dallas TX 75240

Laurie Ltd. P. O. BOX 671098 Dallas TX 75367

Mirrors and Light 2309 Clearspring Dr, S Irving TX 75063

Monte Wade Fine Arts 514 Paseo De La Villita San Antonio TX 78205

Off Mainstreet Gallery 420 South Main Grapeville TX 76051

Originals 10225 Research #100 Austin TX 78759

Positive Images 1118 West 6th Street Austin TX 78703

Screen Porch Art 2422 Rice Blvd. Houston  TX 77005

The Artful Hand 6248 Camp Bowie Rd. Fort Worth TX 76116

The Ole Moon 3016 GreenVille Ave. Dallas TX 75206

Uncommon Angles 1616 S. University, Ste. 303 Fort Worth TX 76107

Ursuline Sales Gallery 300 Augusta San Antonio TX 78205

Village Gallery 502 La Villita San Antonio TX 78205

Village Weavers 418 La Villita #8 San Antonio TX 78205

A Gallery 1321 S, 2100 E, Salt Lake City UT 84108

Artworks 461 Main St. Park City UT 84060

Canyon Offerings 933 Zion Park Blvd. Springdale UT 84767

CODA Gallery 804 Main Street Park City UT 84060

E. Street Gallery 82 E. Street Salt Lake City UT 84103

Finch Lane Gallery 54 Finch Lane Salt Lake City UT 84102

Q Street Fine Crafts 88 Q St Salt Lake City UT 84103

Red Canyon Indian Store 3279 Hwy. 12 Panguitch UT 84759

Appalachian Spring 102 W. Jefferson St. Falls Church VA 22046

Appalachian Spring 11877 Market St/Town Center Reston VA 20190

Art Craft Collection 123 King Street Alexandria  VA 22314

Artemis Gallery 1601 W. Main St. Richmond VA 23220

Artisans 1368 Chain Bridge Rd. MacLean VA 22101

Arts Afire Gallery 102 North Fayette St. Alexandria VA 22314

As Kindred Spirits 1101 South Joyce Street #B8 Arlington  VA 22202

Blue Skies Gallery 26 S. King St. Hampton VA 23669

Crafter's Gallery Route 10, Box 97 Charlottesville VA 22903

Creative Classics 111 S. Alfred St. Alexandria VA 22314

Crystal Galleria 7951 L Tysons Corner Center McLean VA 22102

Elder Crafters of Alexandria 405 Cameron St. Alexandria VA 22314

Electric Glass Company 1 East Melon Street Hampton VA 23663

Hudson Bay Jewelry 1860 Laskin Rd. Virginia Beach VA 23454

Imagine Artwear 1124 King St. Alexandria VA 22314

J. Fenton Gallery 110 S. Henry St. Williamsburg VA 23185

Kane Marie Fine Arts Gallery 2865 Lynnhaven Drive Suite C-3 Virginia Beach VA 23451

Lane Sanson Home Eclectique 3423 W. Cary St. Richmond VA 23221

Leaping Lizard 4408 Shore Drive Virginia Beach VA 23455

Mabry Mill Store 266 Mabry Mill Rd. SE Meadows of Dan VA 24120

Piedmont Arts Association 215 Starling Ave. Martinsville VA 24112

Riverview Gallery 1 High Street Portsmouth VA 23704

Signet Gallery 212 5th Street NE Charlottesville VA 22902

Spirited Collections 125 Mill Street #9 Occoquan VA 22125

Spruce Creek Gallery 1368 Rockfish Valley Hwy Bx 434 Nellysford VA 22958

Sully Framing and Art 6 Wickham Court Sterling  VA 20165

Sussex Gallery 9563 Braddock Rd. Fairfax VA 22032

Touch of Earth P. O. Box 346 Lightfoot VA 23090

Touch of Earth 6580 Richmond Rd. Williamsburg VA 23188

Vivian's Art to Wear 301 E. MAIN ST. Charlottesville VA 22902

Windrush Gallery 12186 Fairfax Town Center Fairfax VA 22033

Designer's Circle 52 Church Street Burlington VT 05401

Fiddlehead at Four Corners 338 Main St. Bennington VT 05201

Garden Gallery 4367 Main Street Manchester VT 05254

Little River Hot Glass Studio P. O. Box 1504 Stowe VT 05672

Stowe Craft Gallery 55 Mountain Road Stowe VT 05672

Unicorn 15 Central St. Woodstock VT 05091

Vermont Artisan Designs 106 Main St. Brattleboro VT 05301

Vermont State Craft Center 85 Church St. Burlington VT 05401

Young & Constantin Gallery Ten South Main St., Box 882 Wilmington VT 05363

Afishionado Gallery 1900 W. Nickerson Seattle WA 98119

American Art Company 1126 Broadway Plaza Tacoma  WA 98402

Art by Fire 5465 Leary Way NW Seattle WA 98107

Art Concepts on Broadway 924 Broadway Plaza Tacoma WA 98402

Art Stop 940 Broadway Tacoma WA 98402

Artists' Gallery of Seattle 902 First Ave. S. Seattle WA 98134

Bainbridge Arts and Crafts 151 Winslow Way E Bainbridge Island WA 98110

Crow Valley Pottery 2274 Orcas Road Eastsound WA 98245

Design Concern 1420 5th Avenue #201 Seattle WA 98101

EarthenWorks 713 First Street La Conner WA 98257

Earthenworks Galleries 702 Water St. Port Townsent WA 98368

Elements Gallery 10500 NE 8th St. Bellevue WA 98004

Fireworks Gallery 210 First Ave. Seattle WA 98104

Flying Shuttle 607 First Avenue Seattle WA 98104

Folk Art Gallery 4138 University Way NE Seattle WA 98105

Glasshouse Studio 311 Occidental Ave. S. Seattle WA 98104

Global Art Venue 314 1st Ave. S. Seattle WA 98104

Holiday Gift & Craft Shop 526 19th Ave. E. Seattle WA 98112

La Tienda Folk Art Galery 2050 NW Market St. Seattle WA 98107

Lakeshore Gallery 107 Park Lane Kirkland WA 98033

Meloy & Company Gallery 1208 Harris AVe. Bellingham WA 98225

Northwest Craft Center and Gallery Seattle Center Seattle WA 98109

Phoenix Rising Gallery 2030 Western Ave. Seattle WA 98121

The American Art Company 1126 Broadway Plaza Tacoma WA 98402

The Legacy LTD 1003 First Avenue Seattle WA 98104

The Woodcarver Gallery 12652 Wilson St Leavenworth WA 98826

Watermark 1115 A ST TACOMA WA 98402

William Traver Gallery 110 Union St., 2nd floor Seattle WA 98101

Artisan Gallery 6858 Paoli Road Paoli WI 53508

Artisan Woods 2935 S. Fish Hatchery Rd. Madison WI 53711

Blue Dolphin House 10320 N. Water St. Ephraim WI 54211

Cornerstone Gallery 101 Fourth St. Baraboo WI 53913

Edgewood Orchard Galleries 4140 Peninsula Players Rd. Fish Creek WI 54212

Fanny Garver Gallery, The 230 State STreet Madison WI 53703

Fine Line Designs Gallery 10376 Highway 42 Sister Bay WI 54234

Flying Colors 608 New York Avenue Sheboygan WI 53081

Gift Itself 125 North Broadway Green Bay WI 54303

John Red's  N70 W6340 Bridge Road Cedarburg WI 53012

Johnston Gallery 245 High St Mineral Point WI 53565

Katie Gingrass Gallery 241 N. Broadway Milwaukee WI 53202

KOHLER/ARTSPACE P. O. BOX 489 Sheboygan WI 53082

Milwaukee Art Museum Store 700 N. Art Museum Drive Milwaukee WI 53202

Newell Gallery 315 East Main Street Waunakee WI 53597

Racine Art Museum 441 Main Street Racine  WI 53403

The Potters Shed 260 Industrial Blvd. Shell Lake WI 54871

Turtle Ridge Gallery 11736 Mink River Rd. Ellison Bay WI 54210

Two Fish Gallery 244 E. Rhine St. Elkhart Lake WI 53020

Water Street Gallery 522 W. Water St.  Princeton WI 54968

Art Company of Davis Box 452 Davis WV 26260

Little Kanawha Craft House 113 Ann Street Parkersburg WV 26101

MorningStar FolkArts US Route 219 North Hillsboro WV 24946

Mountain Laurel Crafts 101 N. Washington St. Berkeley Springs WV 25411

MountainMade P O Box 660 100 Douglas Rd Cir Thomas  WV 26292

Simple Gifts 120 Fairfax St. Berkeley Springs WV 25411

Tamarack One Tamarack Park Beckley WV 25801

Earth, Wind and Fire Galleries 216 S. 2nd St. Laramie WY 82070

Wyoming Arts Council Gallery 2320 Capitol Ave. Cheyenne WY 82002

Wyoming Classics 546 Greybull Ave Reybull WY 82426

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About the “Successful Craft Marketing” CD

There should be a CD-Rom included with this book. If the CD is missing or damaged, write to Craftmasters, P. O. Box 1655, Sebastopol, CA 95473 and ask for another one. The templates on the Successful Craft Marketing CD are not in the public domain. Please don’t copy these templates for other people.

 

Whats on the CD?

 

Marketing Spreadsheets folder, with all the forms and spreadsheets in this book.

 

BW Clip Art folder, with over 10,000 public domain clips for designing logos, etc.

 

Top 200 TT folder, with 200 True Type public domain artistic fonts.

 

1100 Galleries folder, with over 1,000 craft gallery addresses, so you can print your own gallery mailing labels with Microsoft Word.

 

Craft Web site folder, with a complete 8-page FrontPage web site with products and order form.

 

Update, text file in Microsoft Word format with latest updates to this book. Be sure to read  this when you use the disk.

 

Using the 8-page FrontPage web site on the disk.

 

 

1. You will need to set up a web host, where you store your files.  I use hostexcellence.com.  I have had very good experience with their customer service, and they are knowledgeable about FrontPage extensions. They have 170,000 customers. You can get  your domain name from them for free. If you already have one, then you have to go to your domain name server and changer the pointer to your web host.  

 

2. They will email you with passwords you need to upload your side and manage your control panel.  Don’t lose your passwords, and keep them simple.

 

3. Once you get a domain name and a web site, with your domain name pointed to it, you are ready to put up your web site.

 

4. I use FrontPage 2003, so I will describe how to insert images and publish with that.  You might know enough about your older version of FrontPage to insert photos and text and publish this web site without instructions.  If you don’t, get FrontPage 2003 at an office supply store or on eBay.

 

5. Copy the web site folder Craft Web site to your computer, to “My Webs.”

 

6. Open FrontPage and click on “Open Site” under file.  Browse to see your new web site in the window.  Click on OK. When the list of files appears, appears, click on the one that says “index” htm.  That is your home page.

 

7. Place your cursor over any of the text and highlight it or use delete or backspace to make changes, just like a word processor. Where you see a blank, delete it and type in your information.  The text that is in place is there to help you put in your own text.

 

8. To put your image in the Box in the web site, place your cursor over any Box and double click.  A window will come up, click on the “General” tab, and browse to find your image.

 

9. To add new pictures, place the cursor where you want the image, select Insert, Picture, then From file.

 

10. To add more products, click on a product, then Table, Insert, Rows.

 

11. You can change the banner, where it says “Handmade in the USA” by right clicking on it.

 

12. To change a folder name, rename it in the folder list under View, or in the Navigation view by right clicking on the folder and changing the name.

 

13. The navigation buttons don’t work on your computer web site, only when they are in the internet.  Hold down “Ctrl” and click on the button to use them on your computer.

 

14. To get the order form or information sent to your email, right click on the form, select form properties, check the “sent” to button, and type in your web site address, postmaster@hostexcellence, in the email blank. When you click on OK, you get a message that “This form cannot be configured ...would you like to remove the email recipient?   Just click on the NO button.   When the customer clicks on the submit button, the form contents will be sent to your web site email address. You can redirect that address to your normal email from your host manager.  The help phone at hostexcellence will tell you how to do that.

 

15. To change the background colors, change the theme by selecting Format, theme, and picking a theme from the choices in the theme window.

 

16. To add products to the order form, click on the drop down menu under description and add or modify your products and prices. When you are done, copy to the next description drop downs by right-clicking the mouse.

 

17. You can’t have any spaces in the description in the name blank in the drop down Boxes.

 

18. Use the navigation view to delete pages.

 

19. To publish, first make sure your web host site has the FrontPage extensions turned on.  Get help from your web host about this, if you can’t figure it out on your web site manager.

 

20. Click on Publish Site under File. The remote web site properties window comes up. Select the first button, FrontPage or Shared Point services, and type in your full web site address as shown. A window will come up asking your user name and password.  This will be in the information the web host emails you. If you click the remember password Box, you won’t have to remember it.

 

21. A page will appear with your files on the left, and the remote web site on the right.  Click on the Publish button on the right, and your web site will begin publishing.  If you get a message that FrontPage extensions are not installed, check that they are on, and that your email address in your forms goes to the web host (postmaster@craftweb site.com).  If it still doesn’t publish, call the web host.

 

22. You will need to learn more about how to use FrontPage if you want to make other major changes.  If you have any questions about FrontPage that I can answer, email me.

 

 

 

Conclusion

 

As a skilled craftsperson, you will always have a source of income, because the public will always appreciate the beautiful things that you make. You have only to educate the customer as to why your locally handmade products are worth more money than their global counterparts (cheap imports.) The heart-felt appreciation by the customer for the craftsperson who is committed to quality and uniqueness makes the sacrifices and uncertainties of this unique lifestyle worthwhile.

 

In writing this book and software, I hope I have given you some new insights into how to improve your craft business, and shown you how a computer and spreadsheet can help you.  I know you will find a use for many of the tips, addresses, and spreadsheets. The ones you don’t use today may be helpful to you in the coming years as you modify your approach to marketing your craft products.

 

This book and software is updated with every new printing, so if you have any comments, corrections, sources, ideas for new forms, or criticisms, please take a moment to write or email me at eagleab@aol.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Order form

 

Microsoft Office for Artists and Craftspeople                                     128 pages, CD-Rom,  $29.95   

This book and CD has, in addition to the forms in this book, another 50 templates and spreadsheets for managing your business if you expand, including templates for employee applications, non-competing agreement, credit applications, budget, starting your own gallery, project bids, and letter templates for bad checks and other business letters.                                       ISBN   0-9655193-1-7  

 

Successful Craft Marketing             ISBN 0-9655193-3-3                  180 pages, CD-Rom, $39.95

This is the book you have in your hand.  You already know how useful it is, with hundreds of tips, spreadsheets, promoters, shows, and galleries.  Order copies as gifts for your friends, students, etc.

 

 

How to Put On a Great Craft Show                ISBN 0-9655193-8-4                      68 Pages, $29.95

Have you ever thought about putting on your craft show? This book will help you make your first show and every show a lucrative event! All the information you need to organize an exciting craft fair or art show is here!                 Written by Lee Spiegel, former director of the Crafts Fair Guide.

 

 

 

To order any of the above publications, send a copy of this form and a check for the total amount of the order plus $4.05 for Priority Mail shipping to Craftmasters Books, P. O. Box 1655, Sebastopol, CA 95473.  California residents add 7% sales tax.  Allow up to a week for delivery. MasterCard, Visa, and AMEX also accepted. You can also order online at www.craftmasters.com

 

Quantity Title  Price Total

    

    

    

Name:  Sub-Total:  

Address:  Shipping: $4.05

City, State, Zip:  California   Tax 7%:  

Email:  Total:  

Phone:  --------------------------- ----------

Card Number:  Expiration Date:  

Signature:  --------------------------- ----------

    

    

 

Index

AAA, 36, 37

AARP, 36, 70

Abstracta, 38, 39, 69

ACC, 52

advertising, 96, 106, 108

alarm, 37, 38

Allstate, 37

American Craft Council, 49, 52

American Express, 30, 31

American Style, 57

AOL, 61

Application Organizer, 78

application process, 3, 11

applications, 117

Armstrong Products, 29

Art Fair SourceBook, 9

Artists Statement, 27

awning, 26

bamboo rollups, 28

banner, 26, 27, 53, 167

barbell weights, 25

booth shot, 16

Booth sign, 27, 41

brochure, 92

budget, 88

business plan, 5, 102, 106

C. O. D., 55

Caravan, 21, 26

cash box, 44

checklist, 41

clip art, 6, 110, 116

Clip Art, 110

collapsible water carrier, 40

commission, 90

computer, 82, 168

concrete blocks, 23, 40

consignment, 5, 57, 96, 97

Consignment Agreement, 96

Contico, 38, 44

Copyright, 2, 4, 66

copyright notice, 15, 54, 66

craft fair applications, 117

craft fair guides, 3, 9

Craft Fairs, 78, 80, 84

Craft Gallery, 5, 92, 142, 143, 146, 150, 164

Craft Huts, 23

Craft Pricing, 76

craftspeople, 71, 96

Creative Energies, 22, 69

credit, 94

Credit Application, 94, 95

credit card, 3, 17, 29, 30, 44, 55, 65, 86, 94

Credit Cards, 31

Customer List, 86

customers, 86, 94, 102, 104, 106

database, 92

deadline, 78

deduction, 84

Delivery Confirmation, 63

digital camera, 13, 17

directory, 75

Discover Card, 30

dog stakes, 23

domain name, 60, 166

Dome book, 64, 65

Double click, 73

Drag, 73

Dreamweaver, 59

eBay, 4, 13, 15, 59, 60, 63, 166

EIN, 65

Elements, 13, 17, 61, 63, 153, 155, 159, 164

employee identification number, 65

environmental aspects, 34, 108

Equipment List, 82

Excel, 43, 71, 72, 74, 75, 82, 86, 92, 94, 98

exclusivity, 56

Expense Report, 84

fax, 84

festivalnet.com, 9

Filtering Data, 92

Finding Information, 94

Five-Year Goal, 102

Flamort, 28

flea market, 8, 43, 59

fluorescent, 14, 15

Flying, 3, 4, 38, 39, 157, 164

forms, 71, 72

FrontPage, 5, 59, 60, 61, 62, 166, 168

galleries, 92

George Little Management, 49, 52

gift shops, 57, 58, 91, 92

Good Sam Club, 37

Google, 8, 61

gradient paper, 14

Halogen lamps, 20

Hang tags, 30, 41

Hap Sakwa, 69

Health, 4, 45

Home Occupation, 65

hostexcellence.com, 60, 166

income, 84, 98, 102

Indoor booths, 3, 19

ink jet printer, 72

instructions, 75

insurance, 82, 84, 96

Internet Service Provider, 60

inventory, 104

invoice, 100

JPEG, 16

jumper cables, 36

jury, 3, 12, 15, 17, 18, 46

key words, 35

Keyboard Shortcuts, 96

letterheads, 110

letters, 71, 72, 110

light Box, 15

light cube, 15

Light Dome, 22

Lipman, 31

macro, 13, 63

mailing labels, 86, 166

mailing list, 6, 11, 32, 43, 52, 57, 64, 71, 92, 117, 118

mapquest.com, 36

marketing plan, 106

MasterCard, 3, 30, 31, 169

metatags, 61

Monthly Accounting, 98

mouse button, 73

Novus, 30, 70, 154

Office, 4, 6, 20, 56, 64, 71, 96, 98, 116, 169

order form, 54, 56, 59, 62, 166, 167

packtrack.com, 57

partnership, 102

past due invoices, 56

patent, 66

paypal, 62, 63

Pedestals, 29

photography, 12, 69

Photoshop, 13, 17, 61, 63

plastic water cans, 25

portable battery pack, 32

postcards, 52, 53, 54, 67, 142

press release, 5, 66, 67, 108

price, 76, 90, 102

priceline.com, 39

print, 72, 75, 82, 98, 108, 110

profit, 76

promoter, 7, 8, 11, 12, 36, 41, 53, 84, 117

Publisher, 2, 5, 67, 72, 116, 142

PVC tube, 25

QVC, 58

records, 84, 98

rep, 76, 90

Resizing Excel, 94

rest stops, 35

resume, 114

retail, 76, 88, 90

Right click, 73

Rosen, 52

Rubbermaid, 24

Sale, 43, 119, 127, 134

Sales, 3, 5, 32, 33, 51, 90, 91, 97, 163

sales receipts book, 56

sales rep, 51, 56, 90, 91

sales tax, 44, 65, 98, 169

seconds, 19, 30, 31, 43, 53

shipping labels, 112

Shortcuts, 90

show special, 54

shows, 75, 76, 80, 90, 102, 104

slides, 12, 13, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 27, 28, 78

Social Security, 98

software, 2, 168

sort, 78

Spreadsheets, 73

statement, 100

store, 15, 28, 51, 52, 58, 69, 76, 96, 108, 166

tablecloths, 28

tax included, 98

templates, 71, 166

terms, 54, 56, 94, 102

trade show, 4, 5, 51, 52, 54, 58, 84, 88, 94

trailer, 37

travel agent, 39

travelocity.com, 39

Trimline, 23

truck stop, 24, 35

Turbo Lister, 63

Uline, 70

VISA, 3, 30, 31, 33, 41

web page, 62

wholesale, 76, 88, 90, 94, 98

wholesale line sheet, 54

word processor, 110, 118, 167

Works, 72

Zapplication, 3, 17, 19

Zippy Mats, 53

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reveille    by John C. Reiger     www.johneigerpottery.com

 

Alive again!

an’ ready to show

Winter’s over

I’m rarin’ to go

 

Goodby to the boredom

dull staring at walls

Now I am Faire-bound

off to the Malls.

 

Ol’ Bertha is flying

past princes and prole’s

Filled to the sunroof

with pitchers and bowls

 

So scatter before me

you freeway turtles

I am a Red Streak

bounding hurdles.

 

Friends and Fortune

beckon ahead.

Bright lights, warm smiles,

and plenty of bread.

 

I come once again

to hear the praise,

Puffs, and purchases

for three or four days.

 

Unless, of course

the show’s for the birds,

And all that attend

are lookers and nerds.

 

But it’s my life

This “Doing the shows.”

How I survive it,

nobody knows.

 

“Hope springs eternal”

so optimists say.

I guess I agree,

I welcome today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craft Fairs and Art Shows

 

What is a craft fair?

Craft fair:  An event that takes place usually during a weekend, and where a group of people sell what they make; jewelry, woodwork, pottery, paintings, photographs, metalwork, etc.  In addition to crafts, it may have music, or food and wine as an attraction. Every fair has a promoter who finds a location for the fair, secures permits, hires security, and determines which artists and craftspeople will sell at his or her show.

Types of fairs

Basically there are three types of shows:

þ The family show
þ The craft fair
þ The art show

 

The family show may have carnival-type entertainment, chamber of commerce booths, a craft area, and music. At the craft fair there may be some music, but the emphasis is on art and crafts. The art show usually has only fine art and some fine crafts, with no other attractions for the customer. Many events overlap in other areas, for example an art show may have a music group as a lure, or a family show may have crafts only as an afterthought.  Shows may also specialize in either traditional crafts, dried flowers and tole painting for example, or contemporary crafts, including fine handmade jewelry, pottery, fiber, and wood turning.

 

For your first show, you should pick a small local show. You probably won’t make much money but you have to start somewhere, to learn what you need in the way of display equipment, comfort, product, etc. This is called “paying your dues.”  You can even start with a flea market. There are always a few people shopping at a flea market that will recognize quality when they see it, and will give you some valuable feedback about your product, price, and display. Plus you can get rid of a few things cluttering up your garage. Flea marketing of your craft is usually only good for one or two trials, though. For one thing, the people who come each weekend to a flea market tend to be the same people over and over, and after two weeks your sales will drop dramatically.

 

 

First, you need a product

You have a product if:

1.       It is something you like to make.

2.       It is both useful and artistic.

3.       It sells for at least five times more than the cost of the materials in it.

4.       You can make a lot of them at a time.

(If you want to spend six months making a chair, fine, you might have a work of art, but you don’t have a product.) You need a product that people want. If it has a function they will want it even more.

Craft show myths

If you are thinking along any of the following lines as you contemplate a successful craft fair business, forget it. You may be able to pull it off, but you will not be a success.

1. I will buy some imports and sell them as my own.

2. I will just show up at a fair without first applying, and they will let me in.

3. I will find a successful craftsperson and copy them.

4. I will make something that the stores have and sell it cheaper.

5. I will put my crafts on the Internet and won’t have to do shows at all.

6. Being a successful craftsperson is easier that working at a job.

7. I will make only what I like. If the public likes it fine, if not, fine.

8. I can read and relax at a craft show, because I work all week.

9. I don’t need to take Visa or MC, just cash.

10. I can sell crafts and avoid taxes.

All of the above are wrong!

How to find out where the fairs are

Visit a craft fair advertised in your area and ask the artists who the promoter is.  Also ask which shows they recommend, and which ones to avoid. Find out if the show is good for high-end crafts, or lower prices, and how long the show has been going on.

 

You can also search Google on the internet with some general keywords like “craft fairs (your state).”  You will be surprised how many listings pop up.

Tips for finding a show

þ

 

Use www.festivalnet.com.

The membership fee is about $50 a year.  Search the site by state and month, and you will see all the shows in that state for that month.  One way to tell if a show has potential is by the booth fee.  If it is under $100, it is probably too small of a show to make much money. One rule of thumb is that you should make 10x the show fee for it to be a good show.

 

 

þ Use Art Fair SourceBook

After you have been doing shows for a while, and you want to travel to bigger shows in other states, this book is very helpful in telling you what to expect at a show.  It gives you tons of information about each of the top 300 shows in the country.  A subscription for one year is around $200.00. www.artfairsourcebook.com 800-358-2045

 

Localized craft fair guides

Every area in the United States has one or more craft fair guides, magazines that report on fairs for several states in that region. A few guides specialize in fairs only in a single state, and some others try to cover all of the best fairs in the entire country. (See next page.)  

 

 

 

 

Art and Wine Festival, Millbrae, California

 

 

 

 

 

List of Craft Fair Guides

 

NAME OF DIRECTORY ADDRESS CITY ST ZIP CONTACT PHONE AREA COVERED

Marketing Directory for Arkansas Craft Producers P. O. Box 500 Dierks AR 71833 Bob/Beverly Liveoak 870-286-2549 Arkansas

Festival Network Online P. O. Box 18839 Asheville NC 28814 Kirt Irmiter 800-200-3737 United States and Canada

The Crafts Fair Guide P. O. Box 688 Corte Madera CA 94976 Lee Spiegel 800-871-2341 California, Arizona, Nevada, and Oregon

The Crafts Report 300 Water Street Wilmington DE 19801 Bernadette Finnerty 302-656-2209 United States

Art Fair Source Book 2003 N. E. 11th Ave. Portland OR 97212 Greg Lawler 800-358-2045 United States

Your Show Guide P. O. Box 11795 Casa Grande AZ 85230 Mary Davidson 520-836-8427 Arizona, Colorado, and Nevada

Festivals Directory P. O.B 7515 Bonney Lk. WA 98391 Carol Farer 253-863-6617 WA, OR, ID, MT

Sunshine Artist Magazine 3210 Dade Ave. Orlando FL 32804  407-228-9862 United States

The Grapevine 240 W. Harrison Rd. Lombard IL 60148 Lynn Zumstein 630-932-8527 IA, IN, IO, IL, MI, MN, OH, WI, FL

Arts and Crafts Show Business P. O. Box 26624 Jacksonville FL 32218 LaVerne Herren 904-757-3913 FL, GA, NC, Sc, Alabama, MS, TN

        

        

The Network Marketing Guide P. O. Box 1248 Palatine IL 60078 Teresa or Nancy 847-604-3965 IL, MI, rest of the nation.

Country Craft Times 97 Baker Road Cascade MT 59421 Vickey Krautner 406-468-2348 Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, North and South Dakota

Art and Craft Show Yellow Pages P. O. Box B Red Hook NY 12571 Betty Chypre 888-424-1326 Ct, MA, NJ, NY, PA, VT.

Wisconsin Art and Craft Fairs Directory 101 E. Wilson Street Madison WI 53702  608-266-0190 Wisconsin

Craftmaster News P. O. Box 39429 Downey CA 90239  562-869-5882 CA and other western states.

How to choose a good fair

With so many fairs to choose from, it is a challenge to pick a good fair. My philosophy is to try almost any fair (if I have some indication that it might be good), and see what happens. If it is not good, I don’t have to ever do it again. Sometimes a little-known fair will surprise you with a lot of sales. To try and minimize the bad fairs, I have a few basic criteria. Number one, I like to know a lot of people will be there. 10,000, 50,000, 120,000, 600,000 people. With enough shoppers I can usually make money at any show. Show me the people!  If you have a more expensive product, then you might focus more on areas where the customers have more disposable income. This could be a smaller indoor art show that is sponsored by an art guild and has an excellent reputation, or a show in a very wealthy area. Again, experience counts. You have to be willing to try any well-reputed show at least once. That is the only way to know if your product and price is a match for that customer base.

þ

 

Calculate the potential of the show.

Multiply the attendance number by $10 (half of the people will spend $20 and half will spend nothing) and  divide it by the number of artists.  50,000 people times $10 equals $500,000 divided by 250 artists equals an average of $2,000 per artist.

 

The application process

The first step is to get the fair’s application. This doesn’t cost you anything. Write to every fair that you might want to do, and ask for an application. I recommend sending a simple typed letter with your name and contact information. This enables the show producer to get your address right.  The letter need only say "Please send me an application and any information about your upcoming shows, and put me on your mailing list. Thank you."  Print fifty copies of the same generic letter, sign them, and mail them to the shows that you might be interested in. You don’t have to impress the promoter in this letter. They will gladly send an application to anyone. Sometimes, if you have waited until the last minute, the fair can fax you an application or you can get it online. Call for an application only if you have to, not as a habit.

 

When you receive the application, the next step is to make a deadline list with the name of the fair, deadline date, and fair date on a sheet of paper, posted in a place where you will see it. There is a form for this in the spreadsheet section of this book, on page 79. You then file the fair application in a folder with the name of the month on the folder that the fair is going to happen. When your deadline list shows that the fair application deadline is coming up, you go to the fair’s month folder, take out the application, fill it out, and mail it in.

Read and complete the application

Read the entire application when you get it. If you don’t, you will often miss little details, such as “send in a resume,” or “don’t send anything in but the application,” or even “include a slide of your workshop.” It might be hard to get a good slide of your workshop at the last minute. Then fill out the application completely and neatly. Many promoters have told me that they get a lot of incomplete and/or unreadable applications.    

What is the jury looking for?

The jury is looking for good slides, first and foremost. See below. This is the big hurdle. And of course, the jurors are looking for creativity and originality. I can't help you with that.

If a juror is in doubt about a particular applicant, the quality of the slides becomes the determining factor. If the slides are poor, the applicant is out. If they are professional, the applicant is still in the running. Good slides won’t necessarily get you into good shows, but bad slides are likely to keep you out.

Slides

How important are slides? Very important. Extremely important! Simply put, the better the show, the better your slides must be to get in. Although there are still a few good shows that are filled simply by the promoter looking at photos on her kitchen table, all of the best shows are juried.

A jury consists of 2 to 12 artists, promoters, art teachers, and local experts who sit in a darkened room while all of the slides are projected simultaneously on a wall or screen. As the three-to-six slides are shown, each judge gives points for design, creativity, craftsmanship, etc. The process often takes less than a minute for each artist, with the promoter reading the descriptions of each slide supplied by the artist if necessary. Often the acceptance of the artist is based solely on these points.

 

The first thing the jury notices is the quality of the slide. A poorly lit or badly composed slide might not look so bad under home viewing conditions, but at a jurying the slide is instantly compared with the expertly photographed slides already shown that day. So the first impression is important. A juror will be less impressed with unprofessional slides, and they will give fewer points. No matter how nice the craftwork is, you are wasting your time and money with poor quality slides.

 

All slides should be consistent. Each slide should show only one craft item, shown close-up, filling the screen, and well exposed. There is a strong desire in beginning craftspeople to show many items, five or six in each slide. They want to show the jury the range and variety of their design. But the juror will see only clutter. You have to pick your best pieces.

 

The same is true for the background. All of your slides should have the same background. Beginners love to put rocks, flowers, bricks, and other stuff in the picture. They also like to photograph on a fancy cloth or carpet background. They hope the attractiveness of the background will make their craft look more attractive. The opposite will happen. The juror will be confused, not impressed.

 

If you don’t want to spend the time and money to get good photo results on your own, hire a commercial photographer that specializes in craft or small product (table-top) photography. A couple of photographers specializing in crafts are listed in the “useful addresses” section of this book on page 69. Always ask them for unmodified digital files or original film.

 

Photography tips

 

þ Make your own slides with either a 35mm camera or digital camera.

It doesn’t have to be fancy. It just needs to have manual settings so you can control your depth of field. You can use any 35mm camera, or any digital camera with 3.2 megapixels or more.

þ You can have slides made from your digital files.

You can correct your digital photos in Photoshop or Elements, and email the files to www.slides.com.  They make slides from your digital files for around $2.50 each and FedEx them back to you. You can also use your digital files for online applications and for Zapplications. The best resolution for making slides from digital is 4056 x 2730. Another company that makes slides from digital files is www.iprintfromhome.com.

þ Use a 50mm lens with a macro feature.

You can get one of these on eBay for less than $100. For close-ups, you will need macro capabilities. The macro feature will help you fill the image if you make small items such as jewelry. To see if your digital camera with a built-in lens has macro, look for the flower symbol.

þ Film users, use Fuji Provia or Velvia, ISO 100, slide film.

If you use film, Velvia will give you saturated bright colors, while Provia gives you more natural colors. You can use this film indoors if you have blue photofloods. If you don’t have blue photofloods, use a blue 80A filter on your camera lens.  For digital cameras, use the lowest ISO setting in the camera, and the highest resolution setting, for the highest quality of image.

þ Use photo flood bulbs and reflectors indoors.

Use three 500 watt bulbs for indoor shots. Position one on each side and one at the top. Never use a built-in flash.

 

 

 

þ Turn off all fluorescent lights.

If there is a fluorescent light on anywhere in the room, it will add an unwelcome green tint to your photo. If you must have fluorescent lighting, use the daylight bulbs. You should turn off as many other lights as possible, so you control the lighting with your photofloods.

þ Use f16 or f22 for depth of field.

Depth of field is the area of the image that is in focus, from front to back. If your camera has an “A” setting (aperture priority setting), set your f-stop at f22 and the camera will set the shutter speed. Everything will be in focus.  If you want to focus on one special detail of your work, or hide the background, use f4 for less depth of field.

þ Override the camera’s light meter if possible.

The built-in light meter in the camera will overexpose dark items, and underexpose light items.

þ

 

Always use a tripod.

Greater depth of field requires a slower shutter speed, and the longer shutter opening time increases the chance of camera shake. Use either a cable release or the camera timer so you won’t shake the camera and get a fuzzy picture.

þ Use a neutral background.

Don’t use plaids, weavings, etc. Uncluttered is the key. Indoors use white, gray, or black (never use red), outdoors use white roll paper or a white sheet. Use a canopy in bright sun to provide even light. It will act as a giant soft box.

þ Use a graduated background.

You can find gradient paper at Superior Specialties, 800-666-2545 www.superspec.com  I like the #9, black to white, and the #37, blue to white.

 

       

þ Be sure your lens is clean.

Use only a commercial lens cleaning cloth on your lens.  Anything else can scratch the coating on the lens.

 

þ Write down settings for every shot you take.

Save your notes for future reference. If you have kept notes if you use film, you won’t have to relearn the entire process every time you take your photos. When you get the slides back, you can match the best shots with the settings.

þ

 

Use a light box and an 8x loupe.

Look at your slides closely to see if they are sharp or not.  Slides should be clear and in sharp focus. You can get a cheap light box at a camera store for about $30. Another way to see if your slides are sharp is to project them on a screen so you can see them the same size as the jury will.

 

 

þ Use a light tent for small items.

An EZcube Light Tent and photo floods provides even lighting.  They are available on eBay for $45 to $90, depending on the size.

 

 

 

þ Make your own light cube.

You can make a light cube out of translucent panels from Home Depot.  They are in the fluorescent fixture department. They come in 2’ by 4’. You can cut them down to 2’ by 2’, and tape the edges together to make a cube with one side open. You can also make a cube out of 12 24” pieces of pvc covered with light-weight white cloth.

 

þ Put a copyright notice on your slides.

Your copyright notice should say “Artwork Ó 2007 (Your Name).” Some shows don’t allow labels because they cause jams in the projector. In that case you use a Sharpie ULTRA fine point marker. Avery #8167 labels will fit on a slide.  

 

þ Have 5 slides duplicated at a time.

When having slides copied by a lab, have at least 5 or 10 made of the same image at a time to reduce wear on the originals. Always specify 1:1 when getting slides made, so the lab will take the film out of the holder and nothing gets cropped. Store slides so they don’t rub together.

þ Look at your slides as a group.

Put them together. They should have a consistency of vision. Check out the color relationships.  Are they interesting?  Look for a theme.

þ Never use the digital zoom.

Always use the optical zoom, somewhere in the middle of the zoom range. The optics are better in the middle.  Move the camera, not the zoom.

þ Always use “Save As” when working with digital.

Change the name with each modification step, so the original won’t get lost. Save the image at the highest possible setting. Each save to JPEG reduces the quality.

Booth shots

When a show has two qualified applicants in the same media, and they can’t chose, they will go with the best looking booth.  

þ

 

Shoot your booth shot from a slight angle.

Remove all clutter. Make the your product stand out.  Compare your booth shot to your product photos.  They should be the same quality. No people should be in the booth photo.  The top of the booth should not show in the photo.  The jurors don’t care what canopy you use.

 

 

 

þ Use a wide-angle lens for booth photos.

A 28mm to 35mm lens will work best.  Stand on a stool for a better angle, if necessary.

þ Overexpose outdoor booth shots.

If you don’t, the booth will look dark because the automatic meter in the camera will under-expose for the sky. Better yet, keep the sky and canopy out of the photo altogether. A cloudy day will provide even light, which is best. Use a canopy wall on the ground in front of the booth (out of sight of the camera, of course) to reflect more light into the booth.

þ Use flash on indoor booth shots.

Try to get light into the corners of the booth. You can use your photofloods if you keep them out of the photo.

Zapplication

Many of the larger shows are using the zapplication process for online screening. Membership is free to artists. You don’t need any special software (except for photo editing), but you do need an email address and a credit card when you apply to shows. When you want to apply to a show, you simply go online, type in a brief description about your craft, select the photos you want to apply with, and pay the application fee with your credit card. Their web site, www.zapplication.org, is very helpful with detailed information. Zapplication has about 15,000 artist profiles. One nice feature is that they email you about upcoming shows.

 

Photos for Zapplication must be square, 1920 pixels on each side, and under 1.8 mb in size. You can take your own digital pictures at your highest resolution, crop them square, and resize them to 72 ppi by 1920 pixels x 1920 pixels with Elements or Photoshop, and adjust the levels to change the contrast. Any 3.2 megapixel digital camera will work, but 6 to 10 mp is better. The photos should be saved to .tiff as you work on them, and when you are finished saved for the web as baseline .jpg’s.  

 

If you use film, you can either have your slides digitized by your local lab or scan them yourself on a home scanner. Make sure they are saved as .tiff files. Since your photos have to be square for Zapplication, and 35 mm slides are rectangular, you will have to add black strips on the sides of vertical slides or the top and bottom of horizontal slides to make them square.  Basically you are making the canvas behind the slide square, and black, to provide the stripes. The zapplication.org web site explains how to do this very clearly. There are at least 15 professionals listed at the zapplication web site that will convert your slides for you for a fee.

 

Artists can apply through ZAPP™ by following these steps :

1. Prepare your artwork images formatted to the Image Preparation specifications.

2. Create a profile by entering basic contact information and creating a username and password to ZAPP™.

3. Upload up to 40 digital images of your artwork to your image portfolio.

4. Select your choice of participating shows to apply to.

5. Choose the required number of images to apply to a specific show from your image portfolio.

6. Pay the application fee online with a credit card or mail a check.

7. Submit the application online.

8. Receive e-mail notifications when your applications have been received, and jury results.

9. View your application status at any time on the "My ZAPPlications" page and choose to accept or decline show invitations on the site.

 

Get the application in on time

Another detail often overlooked when reading the application is the “must be received by’ or “must be postmarked by” date.  Don’t wait till the deadline date to discover that the show wants the application in their office by that date, instead of merely postmarked with that date. Some shows (not many, fortunately) give preference to early postmarks. If you have any indication that they do, either by word of mouth or specifically stated on the application, get the application in as soon as you get it. At any rate, plan to get the application in the post office at least a week early if you can. That way you will have enough time (if you didn’t read the application when it arrived) to get the required workshop slide, or price list, or photocopy of ID, etc

 

Tips for getting into the show

þ Apply to the show early.

Some shows jury slides in the order they arrived at the office. Jurors might look at over 5,000 slides in a few days and they become bleary eyed after a while. You want them to be impressed with your slides while they are still alert.

 

 

 

þ Make your descriptions precise.

If the show asks for a 25-word description for each image, don’t write more or less. Your description will probably be read to the jury.  If it is too long, it won’t be read in full, and if it is short, you are missing an opportunity to tell the jurors what they can’t see in your slides, such as process, texture, materials, use, etc.  Zapplication allows only 100 characters, and the one description is for all the images.

þ Grab the jurors attention with your slides.

Use slides of your most colorful and interesting work, to get them noticed. Jurors are looking for attention to detail, artistic mastery of materials, structure, and concept. They like to see whimsy, originality, and how everything works together. They are also comparing your work to all the other work submitted. Jurors usually have only 5 to 15 seconds to look at your slides. Sometimes there are several rounds of judging.

Planning your booth

One way to get up to speed about what kind of booth to use is to visit a craft show. Look around at the types of booths and the booth designs. What display looks simple, with the craft dominating, and what looks crowded. Which booths are attractive? Which artists seem busiest? The customer, when faced with a hundred booths and not enough time to examine all of them, will go to the most attractive and interesting looking booth.

 

Don’t be afraid to ask other artists where they got certain items or how they use them. Also ask them how they hold down their canopies, where they got their display showcase, etc. Don’t bother them when they are busy, and limit your questions to only a couple at each booth. Most artists and craftspeople love to share information about their booths (when they have time, of course).

Indoor booths

If you are doing indoor shows only, then a booth frame with drapes or other wall covering is required. You can rent pipe and drape at most good indoor shows for about $140.

 

A workable combination indoor/outdoor booth is a white E-Z UP with the top off indoors (and the center top pole removed). This should have a Velcro-attaching top, as the bolt-on top is a real pain to remove, and you do not want a top in indoor shows. A lot of people will have much more elaborate displays, and scoff at this suggestion. However, I think the E-Z UP is good because:

1. It is very sturdy. It won’t fall into your neighbor’s ceramic or glass booth. (Note that I are talking indoors here.)

2. It has a lot of places from which to hang lights and drapes.

3. You can hang banners across the front to cover the lights and the frame. You can also make cloth socks to cover the legs.

4. It goes up in a flash, leaving you more time to work on the other parts of your display.

5. You don’t have to keep track of a lot of corner pieces and rolling poles.

6. You don’t have to rent pipe and drape, which adds $70 to $140 to your show fees.

7. You can use it for your outdoor shows as well.

 

Lighting

Indoor shows provide electricity. At some shows you have to pay extra, at others you don’t. Some shows require a union electrician and $65.00 just to plug in and turn on your lights!  

 

 

 

Halogen lamps cost about $8 each. They give more light and show colors accurately. They also use less electricity then regular light bulbs. Halogen lamps are available in spot or flood configurations.  Most booths have a 500-watt maximum. Ten 50-watt halogens will light a booth much better than six 75-watt incandescent bulbs. Office Depot has 24” light bars that have three bulb holders. Or you can get track in 4-foot lengths and light units for about $16 each. Attach the track with string ties to your booth poles. Make sure your booth lights don’t shine in the customer’s eyes. Don’t use gooseneck lamps.

 

Use a three-prong extension cord, and grounded 5-plug power strips. Everything should be grounded. You should never use two-prong extension cords. If the electrician requires a grounded (three-prong) wire on your lights, and you have only a two-prong plug, you will have to add a ground wire. Run a wire from the metal part of your light along the original wire and attach all three wires to a three prong plug. Have someone who is knowledgeable about electricity to help you with this.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outdoor booths

 

 

 

Economy--The best display for the least buck is again the E-Z UP canopy. It sets up in a hurry. You can  usually find a quality canopy with durable walls and a carrying bag for under $600. If you do 25 shows a year for four years, your cost is $6 per show.  If you get one with white-coated metal and a Velcro attached top, you can also use it indoors.

 

As for the top, make sure it is not a color canopy. A purple canopy will make all of your products look purple, a blue one will give them a blue tinge, etc. Don’t use a canopy that does not have the legs straight up and down. The canopies with legs that point out look really out of place in a professional craft show.

 

If they are in season at Costco or Sam’s Club, the Caravan (or EZ-Up Lite) is cheaper, around $200, and works for all but the windiest shows. They are lightweight and waterproof. They come with four sides, an awning, a bag with wheels, removable top, and a white coating on the metal parts.

 

 

 

 

           

 

E-Z UP frame used outdoors, and at indoor show for sturdy hanging of heavy items

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Professional--The Light Dome, from Creative Energies, 800-351-8889, is very heavy duty. The cost is around $800.00 with 4 walls and carrying cases. The frame weighs about 35 lbs, and the walls about 8 lbs each.  The top is 14 lbs, so the whole canopy weighs just over 75 lbs. You can use it anywhere, indoors or out, it goes up relatively fast, it is lightweight, and it looks good. It is also the most sturdy. I have been in shows with hurricane-force winds that had every tent flapping in every direction with the exception of one well-anchored light dome, which didn’t even move.

 

 

 

Light Dome

 

 

 

 

You can also use a Light Dome indoors. The large round cross-poles hold drapes and lights easily.

 

 

Other Canopies –Some artists get a Trimline Canopy for really bad weather. This is a different look than the E-Z UP, and takes about 20 minutes longer to set up.  Available from the Flourish Company at 800-296-0049.  Flourish also sells mesh panels for hanging art.

 

 

 

Craft Huts are used by artists who sell in hurricane areas. They have steel legs and will not leak.  Always use the top cross brace on a Craft Hut.  If you don’t, the arches can blow in toward the middle, and the top will fill with water during rainstorms and collapse the entire tent.  They are also available from Flourish.

 

City streets

 

 

 

 

The best anchor for city streets is weights. Thirty five to fifty pounds per corner will usually be enough. Some craftspeople nail the legs of the canopy with concrete nails, or use screws with washers and electric screwdriver, directly into the asphalt.  Many shows expressly prohibit this (today’s nail hole is tomorrow’s pothole). The promoters may not mention it to you, but you might not get back into the show. I recommend weighting two or more corners with 70 pounds each, then have an extra 70 lb. weight in the middle of the booth, with a rope tied to the top (for E-Z UPs). Concrete blocks weigh 34 lbs. Any wind that can move this much weight can move almost any amount of weight, so if a storm is expected, and you don’t have tall panels, lower the canopy to half-height overnight (another handy feature of the E-Z UPs and Light Domes).

Grassy parks

 

 

Tents in a grassy park are the easiest to tie down. Use dog stakes. A dog stake is a corkscrew-like device available at pet supply stores that is screwed into the ground. Put two stakes on the two corners that face the wind, and another in the middle of the tent. The middle one is screwed in before the show, but it is only used when the wind comes up. A rope is quickly tied to it and looped over the top of the canopy frame. This sure beats standing there holding your canopy as the wind blows it around.   You can and should still use weights, if you have them.

 

  

In a large tent

Some outdoor shows have huge big-top tents that everyone sets up their booths under. The Asparagus Festival in Stockton, California, the Columbus Arts Festival in Ohio, and the Jazz Festival in New Orleans have big tents. A tent show usually consists of a Circus Tent about 30’ by 80’ or larger. Some tents have room for your E-Z UP inside of the tent. Be sure to remove your top for more light, and remove your peak pole so you don’t put a dent in their tent. Occasionally a tent show will not allow E-Z UPs or a full size 10 x 10 booth. You will still need something to hold your walls up and to keep them from flapping into your neighbor’s booth. You might have to make or buy a conduit frame to make a booth nine and one-half feet on each side by seven feet high. Flourish also sells these. You might need a wall for the front at night, unless they drop the tent walls. There is no need to spend much on this setup, as you will only use it in tent shows.    

 

 

Weather

 

Rain:  The best protection from rain is a canopy with walls. Everything should be stored in Rubbermaid’s. If the corners of the top of your E-Z UP start to collect water, a large clamp on the top of the inside frame will usually prevent puddling.

Wind: Wind will either blow your canopy away or blow things out from under it. The best tie-down is to something already there, a rail, a tree, park bench. If you are next to a really heavy booth, ask them if you can tie your canopy legs to theirs.

Wind AND rain: This is the worst scenario. This is one reason why a lot of craftspeople only do indoor shows. But they are missing a lot of opportunities to make money. All a windy and rainy show means is that you need even more weather protection.  The sun will eventually come out and you will make lots of money.

Heat:  Bring an ice chest, ice, and lots of water. You need a canopy for shade. You can add an awning on the side that gets the most direct sun, to shade your products. portable AC or DC fans (from truck stop stores) will help keep you and your customers cool.    

 

 

 

More tips for outdoor shows, weights and weather

þ

 

Always have a weight handy when you set up.

You should tie your booth to a weight or immoveable object while you are setting up, in case of a sudden gust of wind.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

þ Use 8-gallon plastic water cans for weights.

8 gallons of water weighs about 65 lbs. Get the water cans with handles (sporting goods, camping stores, or RV stores). Fill them at a gas station or food booth when you get to the show and dump them at the end of the show. Carrying empty cans will save you gas, since less weight in your vehicle increases your gas mileage.

 

 

 

 

þ  Use barbell weights for booth weights.

Use rope through the hole in them for hanging from your top frame

 

 

 

þ

 

Make your own weights with PVC tube.

Fill a 6” diameter PVC pipe, 36” long, with concrete, using an end cap and a 12” eyebolt with a washer on the other end. It can be tied to the legs of the canopy (remember, no tape on canopy legs) or fastened to the upper frame with a rope. Florida artists use as much as 100 lbs. on each corner of their display. (It can be very windy in Florida!) Don’t use 3” or 4” tube—you’ll be wasting your time with light weights. You can also fill a 5-gallon bucket with concrete and use an eyebolt in the same way.

þ Attach weights to top of tent as well as legs.

Attach the rope to the cross bar on E-Z UPs.  When weights are used only on the legs, the tent can still twist in the wind.

þ Use metal stakes in hard ground.

E-Z UP canopies come with 12” nail-like stakes. They are designed to be hammered into dirt, through the hole in each leg plate. Have a claw hammer handy to get them out.

þ Use your spare tire for an emergency weight.

If you forgot your weights, use your spare tire. It won’t help much but might keep your canopy from flying until you get some real weight. Use a rope to attach it to the center or top corner of your booth.

þ

 

Use ropes to keep canopy straight.

Screw a stake in the ground at the middle of each side and at the back, then tie ropes to each corner. This keeps the tent from leaning in the wind.

 

 

þ

 

Keep your electrical outlet dry.

If you have an outdoor booth with electricity, make sure  your outlet is in your booth at night. Raise it up off the ground. Don’t wrap a plastic bag around the outlet; it might fill up with water. When unplugging lights, stand on something dry, like cardboard or a ladder.  

 

þ Keep an ear on the weather.

A weather radio can be purchased at Radio Shack for less than $50. You should ask a local at the show which county the show is in, as weather reports are given by county.

þ

 

Make an awning for your booth with conduit.

Use three eight or ten-foot pieces of 1” conduit.  Clamp two on each side of your E-Z UP, poking out the front about 3 feet.  Clamp one piece in the middle.  You can fold up a wall, or use a banner, and hang it across the pipes. Put clamps on the ends. Use it in rainy weather or when you are facing the sun.  Some of the new Caravan canopies come with an awning. Make sure it is 6’ 6” tall or more, so no one bumps their head on it.

þ If it is really windy take your canopy down.

This is what might happen if you don’t.

 

 

 

Fountain Hills, Arizona

þ Get 12-volt accessories at truck stops.  

Truck drivers run everything on 12 volts. You can get 12-volt fans to keep your booth cool.  They also have 12-volt coffee makers, coolers, TV’s, vibrating seat back pads, hot plates, etc.

 

Banners, booth signs, and photos

 

Banner: A banner is a great help to people trying to find your booth who had promised to return (those customers are called Be-Backs.)  It also helps them decide whether to come over to the booth in the first place, when there are so many booths to choose from. The banner should say something about the contents of the booth, not simply the name of the artist. Unless the artist is relatively famous, the banner should say “Handmade Wood Bowls” or “Wood Bowls by Dana Andrews,” not just “Dana Andrews.”

 

 

 

You might need two banners. One cloth, about one foot high by five feet long that hangs across the top of your canopy on a rope. It helps people find you if they came to the show looking for you.  You can take it down at night, when you don’t want anyone to know what is in your booth. The other 2 1/2 feet high and 9 feet long, and vinyl. Usually made by a commercial sign company and has your product and signature on it. It is used only for big outdoor fairs when a potential customer may be 50 feet or more away from the front of the booth. Get banners from Kinkos, with grommets on the corners. Attach to 10’ conduit poles with bungies, and attach poles to canopy legs with clamps.

 

Statement of Purpose (Artists Statement): This is an 8” by 10” sheet of paper in a clear acrylic stand on your table or hanging in your booth on the wall. It might have a photo of you working in your shop and your name and address at the top. The rest of the page should tell the customer a little about you, how your craft is made, what materials you use, and something about your motivation and purpose. Thanks to the NAIA, many fairs are requiring it in your booth. Some customers love to read it completely while waiting. Others might even want a copy, if you feel like handing them out. Send a copy of this statement with your show applications, unless the show specifically states that you should only send slides and nothing else. Some shows are requiring an artist’s statement with the application.  

 

Booth sign inside: Every booth should have a sign about 12” by 24” with the name of the artist and where the artist is from, hanging in the back of the booth. Some shows provide them, but I like to bring my own in case they don’t. A sign that indicates the town and state you are from is a good conversation starter. Having your name in large print is helpful to the customer when writing a check.  

Photo of your workshop: Always have a photo of your shop somewhere in the booth. It can be little or big. When asked, “Do you make these yourself?” point to the photo and say, “Yes. Here is a picture of my shop and the tools I use.”  This is also a great conversation starter. People are very curious as to how you make your product.  

 

 

 

Photos of your creations:  Many artists with small products have large photos of their products hanging up in their booth. These are helpful for people who can’t get quite close enough to see because of the crowd. You can get a slide or print blown up to a 20” x 24” poster at Kinko’s for under $40. Kodak, through photo stores, offers 20” x 30” posters from your slides for $22.95.

 

More display ideas

þ

 

Use drop down bamboo rollups for walls.

8-foot rollups attached to your EZ-up frame with shower curtain hooks will make your booth seem cozier. They allow air circulation on a hot day, while providing some privacy from the booth next to you. You never know who your neighbor is going to be. The only drawback is that 8 feet is too long for most cars without a luggage rack.  2 four-foot rollups can be used instead.

 

 

 

þ Have your product photos laminated on both sides.

If your hanging photos are laminated on both sides, they will hang easier in your booth and won’t be damaged by water. For indoor shows, mount them on foam core from an art supply store. Use grommets and strong thin wire to hang up your photos to keep them from ripping or falling down.

þ Use dark curtains indoors.

The background should not be noticeable. If not black, burgundy and neutral colors are best.

þ Use white walls outdoors.

White will reflect light into your booth and brighten up your crafts in the shade of your canopy.

þ Hang a curtain over a back corner of your booth.

Use the space for a changing room or storage.

þ Fireproof your tablecloths.

Fire retardant paints and sprays are available from Flamort. They will provide a certificate for the fire marshal.  www.flamort.com  (510) 357-9494

 

 

þ Use a portfolio or scrapbook.

 

 

Take prints of your past creations and put them in a scrapbook along with pictures of your studio. Customers can browse this while waiting.

þ Display items at various heights.

This increases the visual appeal of your booth. Small items in your booth should be closer to eye level. Makes your crafts easy to reach. Pedestals are available from Armstrong Products in Oklahoma-800-278-4279  www.armstrongproducts.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

þ Make your table taller.

Use PVC tubing to make leg extensions, so your customers don’t have to bend over to see your products. The closer to customer eye level the better.

 

þ Have signs in your booth that communicate.

Artist’s statement, credit card acceptance, discount policy, name of business, etc., all signs that talk to your customers for you. They also give customers something to read while you are talking to other customers.

þ Uncluttered look:

After you set up, step back and see if your booth looks cluttered. If so, simplify it. Hide boxes and carts. Some promoters require this, and it benefits you as well.        

þ

 

Use a tall chair.

You shouldn’t have to get up to get out of your chair to make a sale. Every time you get up from a low chair you put stress on your back. You should be able to just slide forward off of it. The seat should be at least 30” high, so you are eye-level with the customer. I like Gold Medal canvas director chairs and the aluminum chair that www.dickblick.com sells.

 

Packaging

Gift Boxes:  If your product is useful as a gift, and a gift box is available, you should display a few boxes and offer them to every customer, especially around Christmas, Father’s Day, Mother’s Day, etc. If the customer is looking for a gift and sees the product already in a nice gift box, you have just provided a solution. Or the gift box may stimulate the customer to think of your product as a gift and then think about who to give it to.

Bags: Every product should be put in an attractive bag. The customer appreciates it. You should have two sizes of bags, a small one that holds one or two products, and a big one that holds more. Offer to hold the customer’s purchase while they check out the rest of the show.

Hang tags: Every product should be packaged with a tag that has information about how the product was made, what it is made of, how to care for it, who made it, and how to get in touch with them. This tag should also fit neatly in the gift box.    

 

Taking VISA and MasterCard

You should try to get set up to take charge cards as soon as possible. At some shows your income will be 80 or 90 percent from VISA or MasterCard sales. There are two ways to take cards:

1. Run the card through a portable imprinter at the show, and then call in the sales when you get home.

2. Run the card through a portable wireless terminal at the show, which clears the card through a cellular connection.

 

You will need a business account with a bank, and permission from them to take cards in your business. The bank is going to give you the money from the cards before it is actually collected by them, so you must have good credit. If your bank won’t let you take credit cards, there are several choices:  

 

 

1.  Get another bank. If you have $2,000 cash to open a business account with, make it clear to the new bank that your opening the account is contingent on your being able to process credit cards. They will take you seriously if they want your business. You tell them that you will be taking the cards at trade shows or at shows in your home. They will probably visit your home to see if you really have a business. They may also want to see a business license.

2.  Go directly to a credit card company. Novus Services, a company associated with Discover Card, will set you up directly with them, and they send the money from the card charges directly to your bank. Their phone number is 1-800-347-2000. They will let you take MasterCard and VISA in addition to Discover. They give you a portable imprinter and sell you a Trans 330 terminal for about $300. You imprint a charge slip from the card at the show in the imprinter and give the customer a copy. Later at your motel or home, you key in the numbers from the card on the Trans 330, which is hooked up to a phone, and they give you an authorization number clearing the card. They charge you about 2.4 % of the sale amount. They are anxious to get more business, and more likely to sign you up than a bank. American Express is a separate company, and their charges must be processed separately. They too are actively looking for new businesses.  They have a separate imprinter for their shorter charge slips.    

 

A cell-phone setup has the added benefit of having a phone for calling. The drawback to the cell-phone setup is that there may be roaming charges in addition to the monthly charge for the cell phone, plus charges for the terminal. There are some areas where a cell phone doesn’t work. The whole process of clearing the card by phone usually takes about thirty seconds or more.

 

 

 

 

Portable credit card terminals

 

 

You can use a portable wireless modem terminal at shows. One company with a terminal I recommend is Trade Show Merchants Network. Their number is 888-626-2772. The machine they first sold is called a Lipman 2090. There are newer models available, such as the 8000. They are completely portable, and uses either rechargeable batteries or can be hooked up to AC POwer. The 2090 can be connected to a phone line in your office, or connected by wireless when you are at a show. The 8000 has no phone line connectons, but greater reception. The customer’s charge card is processed immediately by sliding the card through the terminal, and a receipt is handed to them to sign. A copy of the receipt is printed for the customer. The terminal clears the card in about seven seconds. At the end of the day, the credit card company, processes the batch of charges and deposits the money from VISA and MasterCard into your bank account. At the end of the month you receive a statement from the company detailing your sales by card type. Most companies charge a capture fee for American Express and Discover cards for clearing their cards. American Express sends the money from these cards to your bank directly. It may take a few days longer to appear in your account. You have to set up the accounts with American Express and Discover separately, and then the terminal will take all of the cards.  

The cost of the latest Lipman 8000 wireless terminal is around $700. Credit card processing fees are cheaper (1.8%) when cards are run through a terminal and cleared immediately, than when run through an imprinter and called in by phone (2.8%). The reduction in fees and reduction in losses from bad cards will pay for the terminal in a year or two. The time you save by not calling in the cards after the show, and the peace of mind from having the card cleared at the show, make the cost of the terminal worthwhile.

(http://www.infomerchant.net/creditcardprocessing/pos_terminals/lipman/nurit-3010.html)

 

 

 

Tips for taking credit cards

þ Put up “Credit Cards Accepted” signs.

Some people are looking for this notice. They might have run out of cash at another booth, or simply didn’t bring any.  By the way, never charge extra for charge card usage. It is illegal to charge a customer extra for using a credit card.  However it is not illegal to give a discount for cash.

þ Keep all credit card sales receipts.

Put them in a separate envelope, with the name of the show written on it. If the charge is disputed, the signed original will be easier to locate.

 

 

þ

 

Check the customer’s credit card for their signature.

If it isn’t signed, have them sign it before you take it.  If you are suspicious, ask to see their driver’s license, and compare the signatures.  Some customers prefer not to sign their credit cards.  You can’t force them to do so, but remind them that a thief could sign their name for them, and then the “false signatures” would match.

þ Bring a manual credit card machine and charge slips.

If your electric credit card machine fails, runs out of paper, etc, you will still be able to take credit cards. If you use a manual credit card machine, try to get a phone number and address. It is illegal to require a credit card user’s phone number, but you can ask them to put it in your address book for your mailing list. Then you will be able to call them if the slip is unreadable or lost (or if they left something in your booth). If you run out of charge slips when on the road, go to a local bank for more charge slips.

þ Always check the charge slip for clarity.

Check to see if the number and expiration date is clear. Some cards have worn numbers, or the numbers have been tampered with (flattened). Sometimes the machine might not imprint the whole number (which you must notice when you fill out the slip). When you get home to call the charges in, if you don’t have the whole number, you won’t get paid.

 

þ Carry a portable battery pack.

 

 

A Vector Jump Starter (from automotive supply) and a Radio shack 12 volt DC to 110 AC converter, will come in really handy if your credit card terminal battery goes dead. The EverStart shown here is from Target and works just as well with the AC converter.

 

 

Sales techniques

People buy for personal benefit. Theirs. Not to do you a favor. Not because you are good looking or well dressed. They benefit from your product, or they pass it by. They might visualize how comfortable it will feel in their hands the next day when they pick it up. Or they will visualize being perceived as individualistic because they have or give a one-of-a-kind object, or as an art lover who has actually met the artist who made the item, or as a meticulous person who buys well-crafted items. This is where the large photo of your item being used is helpful; it shows the customer how he will benefit. It is simply a matter of the price of the item matching the benefits of the item to the customer.

 

 

 

Reading. No, you shouldn’t read a book in your booth. It is too absorbing. A magazine might be okay, as the articles are shorter and don’t require as much attention. A magazine about your craft, Metalsmith or Fine Woodworking for example, is beneficial to both you and the customer. You learn some new techniques while waiting for a sale, and when you set the magazine down where the customer can browse it while waiting, he might starting   thinking about fine woodworking or that you are an expert in metalwork. If a magazine is prominently placed in your display, the customer might even infer that you are featured in the magazine. No harm there. Someday you will be. If you already are featured in a magazine, by all means, display it.

 

Sales pressure. Some customers might walk into a booth where the artist is preoccupied, but be reluctant to walk into a booth where the artist is staring at them and eager to jump up and start trying to sell them something. Always say a couple of words to the customer, such as “Feel free to look closely,” or “Try using it.” After you get the product in their hands, give them time to examine the work, give them the details they ask for, and maybe a suggestion that the item would make a good gift, and that you have gift boxes. Then leave them alone again. People really appreciate feeling un-pressured in a shopping environment. Just imagine how you want to be treated when you shop. You want to be helped when you need it, but you don’t want a salesperson hovering around you all the time. Do the same for your customers.

 

How badly you need to make the sale is irrelevant. Whenever a customer asks how the show has been for you, tell them you are doing well, even if it is the worst show you have ever done. Even the worst shows have some benefits, such as learning frugality or humility, so you won’t necessarily be lying. Never complain to the customers. There is nothing they can do about it.

 

Suggest the lower priced item. When a customer asks you which one you recommend, never recommend the higher priced item. They will always be suspicious and you will be scrambling to explain why it is better. Recommend a mid-range item, and they will immediately trust you. Of course, all of your products are of excellent quality and priced at exactly the right price.

 

Give them a reason to buy today. Offer them a small discount (under 5%) if they buy now. Say, “It is always good to have some gifts around in case you need them for an unexpected occasion.” In order to encourage an immediate sale, don’t give out business cards (except for the “care and contact information” card you give the customer after the sale).

 

Assume everyone has a credit card. That means they have the money to buy your item, unless all of their cards are maxed out. Be sure they can see your VISA card signs, or machine, and that you tell them you take charge cards.    

 

Selling tips

þ

 

Listen to your customers.

They notice if you are not listening.  If you are already dealing with a customer, and a second customer interrupts, ask the first customer if you can talk to the second one. Deal with the question politely, and then get back with your first customer.

þ Educate your customer.

Art sales involve 50% education and 50% sales technique.  Most people at your booth have no idea how you do what you do. Tell them why your work is worth the price and how hard it was to make. Be prepared to talk your head off. Don’t let a few know-it-alls discourage you.

þ Mention environmental aspects of your craft.

If you have an environmental angle to your product, describe it. Conservation of resources is very important to some people. Tell them how you use materials economically.

 

 

 

þ Tell people a story about your product.

They want to know what inspired you to make it and how hard it is to make. Have photos of your shop to show them. Tell them about your lifestyle.

þ Maintain eye contact.

If you are looking all around the show, they will too.

 

 

 

þ

 

Never judge a customer by their appearance.

Every artist has a story about the customer who looked like a hobo, but bought a very expensive item.

þ Remind people if it is the last day of the show.

There are customers at every show who think the show goes on forever.

þ Use key words to make sales.

Some comfortable key words are “warm, soft, clean, powerful, bigger, better, and yes.”  Yes is the best. Yes, I have a gift box. Yes, I take charge cards. Yes, I have a trash bag. Yes, yes, yes.

þ Offer a hesitant customer a guarantee.

Offer a full refund, replacement, or repair if customer is dissatisfied.

þ If people ask for your card, get their address or email.

Hand them a guest book to write their email in.  You can contact them with a postcard or catalog later. Do this whether you have a business card or not.  

 

 

On the road

Many artists prefer to travel to shows in a van. A van is not much longer than a car when it comes to parking and getting in and out of the show set-up area. But if you ever need to nap or camp overnight, you may have that option with a van, and not with a car. Also, when you are driving a van, you have better visibility, and everyone on the road can see you better. And, of course, you can haul a lot more stuff. The drawbacks are that you can’t drive as fast, and you use more gasoline.  I suggest that you not design a booth to fit your car, but get a vehicle that fits the booth design for maximum sales.

 

 

 

 

I don’t recommend sleeping in rest stops on the freeway at night. There is no security at a rest stop. If you are traveling and all rooms are booked up, park or nap in a truck stop. Almost every truck stop in the U. S welcomes RV's (and vans).  The bigger ones have 24-hour restaurants, and free showers with a fill-up. Most have a security guard and cleaner, safer bathrooms. The main drawback is truck noise. You either have to park as far from them as you can, or get earplugs. More and more truckers are husband and wife teams, and truck stops cater to them. The restaurants at some of them (Pilot) have all-you-can-eat buffets for $6.00, and phones at every booth. You can hook your computer up at a booth and check your email.  Just act like you own a big rig. ;-)

Travel tips

þ Never drive when sleepy.

McDonald’s coffee or Coca Cola will keep you awake! Better to be alive with bad coffee than dead with no coffee.

þ Keep a travel kit in your car.

A travel kit might be a bag with toothbrush, toothpaste, deodorant, floss, nail clippers, hairbrush, ibuprophen, aspirin, and vitamins. If you keep it in your car or van at all times, you won’t find that you have forgotten one of the above when you get to your show.

þ Keep a small fire extinguisher handy.

Always carry a fire extinguisher in your car or van. You never know when it might save your stock or someone’s life.  You can keep it in your booth during the show. I know one artist who had an engine fire in a gas station, and the fire extinguisher saved his life and the gas station!

þ Use mapquest.com to get a map to the show.

Usually the show promoter will give directions to the show, but mapquest can also give you directions from the show to your hotel.  www.mapquest.com

þ  Use an AAA or AARP card for an affordable room.

Either of these cards will save you at least 10%.  AARP cards are only available to people age 50 and over.

þ Always carry jumper cables.

You might leave your lights on, drain your battery, and need a jump-start. Get 12 gauge, not 14 or 16, and the longest ones they have.

þ

 

Carry a first aid kit.

If you keep a well-stocked kit in your car, you will have what you need to fix a blister, cut, or scraped knuckle on the road or at the show.

 

 

 

þ Check your tire pressure.

Carry a tire gauge.  Fully-inflated tires can increase your gas mileage 15%. While the tire is cool, inflate to about 5 lbs less than the maximum pressure stated on the side of the tire.

þ Check your spare tire for air.

You might be driving around with a flat spare tire, which would be no help at all if you have a flat. Check for a car jack and a tire iron. Get the big x shaped tire iron.  A woman can leverage one of these to loosen wheel nuts.  

þ Learn to change your own tire; anyone can do it.

Sure, AAA can change it, in an hour or so.  But you might miss the show. Carry gloves and coveralls to wear to change the tire. And keep a working flashlight in your vehicle. It is usually worthwhile to carry a floor jack if you have room. They are much faster and easier to use than the pneumatic or scissor type.

þ Learn how to check your car fluids.

No one else is going to check them for you all the time.  Learn how and where your oil, transmission, power steering, and wiper fluids are filled.

þ Clear your gas line with STP water remover.

Available at Kragen or Pep Boys.  Make sure the bottle says something about water removal from gas lines.  Water buildup comes from condensation or fog, and will make your engine run rough.

þ Carry a spare alternator belt.

The service station might not have the right one if yours breaks. Have someone show you where it is under your hood, so you can know if it is broken.  Usually the alternator light will come on. A salesman at NAPA Auto Parts will tell you which one fits your vehicle. They are fairly easy to replace, with just a wrench and a screwdriver.

þ Carry extra keys.

Keep them in a magnetic case under the car. Kragen Auto Supply sells the case.

Security on the road

þ Have a tow service--Allstate, AAA, or Good Sam.

The Good Sam Club Emergency Road Service is about $100 a year. This includes towing, gas, flat fixing, and lost keys.    Good Sam Emergency Road Service for RV’s phone number is  (800) 234-3450.  The number for AAA is (800) 922-8228.  Sears Allstate Motor Club, (866) 209-0394.

þ  Get an alarm for your vehicle

It should have an engine kill switch, remote, window stickers and a flashing red light visible to thieves when it is armed. Alarms cost less than $250 installed. I am always surprised that more artists don't have one.

þ

 

If you have a trailer, get a lock for it.

Paint a big number on the top and one on the street side. The one on top should be clear and big enough to be seen from a police helicopter.  Chances are your trailer will be found only a few miles from where it was stolen. If the police won’t help you find your trailer, you can always rent a helicopter and pilot and look for it yourself.

 

 

 

þ Don’t tell the motel clerk you have valuables.

 

 

Don’t even ask if they have a lock box, unless it is an extremely reputable motel or hotel chain.

þ Leave a light and TV on in your motel room.

A thief might think it is occupied when you are gone.

þ Don’t ever leave your key in your car ignition.

Don’t leave it in the ignition when you are loading in or packing up, or when your car is in your driveway, or gas station, or anywhere, ever. Also, don’t leave your cell phone on the dash.  Thieves will sometimes smash a car window just for a cell phone.

þ Use a steering wheel locking device.

If you don’t have a burglar alarm, at least get a steering wheel lock. The Club (Le Club) costs about $30, and might save all your stock.

þ Always park in a well-lit area.

Park in front of your door at the motel, or in front of or very near the lobby.  If you have a view of your vehicle, you can see by your flashing lights if the alarm is your car.

 

Flying to Craft Fairs

Flying to a craft fair has many advantages. You can do a show anywhere in the country, whenever you want. Otherwise, if you want to drive to shows in another part of the country, you would have to line up several in a row to make the trip worthwhile. Once you figure out how to fly to a show, you just pick the best ones around the country, fly there and fly back. Plus, you get more time in the shop.

 

Some crafts are easier to fly with than others. The lighter and smaller your product, the easier it is. But don’t let a heavier craft stop you from the big shows. The trick for big crafts is to ship your product by air cargo, rent a van when you get to the show, pick up the products with the van, and there you are, van and products, on the other side of the country, on the same day. The last time I checked, you could ship 250 pounds for $70 air cargo.  

 

 

 

Yes, you can fly with your canopy. It must have a cover on it.  Bring your products with you in your carry-on luggage, and check the canopy with the rest of your luggage at the baggage counter. At the counter you will have to pay $80 for each additional bag over two (depending on your airline. ATA is only $50).  Tipping the skycap to get more baggage on the plane no longer works since 9/11 security measures went into effect. 

 

You can travel with a portable table (made from tubing from Abstracta) in a large suitcase, a Contico fiberglass trunk with 4 wheels attached on the bottom with selling supplies in it, another suitcase with gift boxes and some clothes, and a canopy.  Use a rolling carry-on bag with a handle and a small daypack.  They both have to fit through the x-ray machine, and be small enough to stuff in the overheads. The next trick is getting it all into a cab, your car rental, or the airport shuttle.

Flying tips

þ Book roundtrip flights with www.travelocity.com.

At this time, they seem to be able to locate the best prices for round-trip airline tickets. Priceline is not good for flights because you usually have to get to the show by a certain time.

þ Use a travel agent if you need to book separate flights.

Use a travel agent if you are flying to one city and returning from another. They can also tell you if you will need a car or not to get from your hotel to the show, and they might find you a room at a pretty good price. A good agent that I use can be reached at (800) 835-5090.

þ Book rooms with www.priceline.com.

Offer a ridiculously low price; you just might get it. Start with three stars and $49.00.  You might get bumped up to a four star hotel.  Only ask for one area with your first offer.  You can’t raise your price without changing something, so if you don’t get your price you can add another area or reduce your stars and then slightly lower your bid. Two star motels like Extended Stay America often have kitchenettes, and sometimes go for a bid of $31.00.  Start early, because if your bids don’t work, you have to wait three days to bid again.

þ Print out your online airline and hotel reservations.

Take them with you. Sometimes the hotel or motel computer doesn’t get the information in time.

þ Use UPS to ship packages to your hotel.

70 lbs. from SF to NY costs $56, $40 if you have daily pickup.

þ Use your frequent flyer miles to fly to shows.

To find out more ways to get frequent flyer miles, go to www.mileageworkshop.com.  

þ

 

Keep your valuables in your carry-on bag.

Never leave anything valuable in your checked luggage.

þ Make a lightweight table with Abstracta ½” tubes.

Abstracta Structures (800) 223-7315    www.abstracta.com. You can use their tubes to assemble portable lightweight tables and cases for jewelry with glass or plastic tops, that fit in one suitcase.

 

 

 

þ

 

Use a collapsible water carrier for weight.

You can get a 5 gal. collapsible water carrier by Reliance (Winnipeg, Canada, R3H-1A4, or Marin Outdoors). Five gallons of water weighs 42 lbs., but the container weights only two lbs empty. Fill at a faucet or with a hose (food booths), and borrow a hand truck to carry it to your booth.

 

þ Use concrete blocks for weights.

If you are renting a car, get concrete blocks (and rope) at the local Home Depot for $5 each, use them for weights, and after the show, give them to another artist, take them back to Home Depot, or leave them in a dumpster or construction site.

 

     

 

                                    Concrete block covered with white tape

How to increase profits

 

If you are not making enough money selling your craft, here are a few ideas:    

 

1. Increase the price (improve the product). If your product has the right price, determined by your cost of materials, hourly wage, shop overhead costs, and retail selling costs, you can’t raise your price too much without improving the product. Everything has a “right price” regardless of who you are selling it to. Use the pricing spreadsheet in this book. Many crafts at fairs are priced too low, and a few too high. If your price is the right price, and seems too much for the customers who visit your booth, then you simply have to find a show with more affluent customers.

2. Reduce production costs. Find a way to get your materials for less money. The Internet is great for this. Another way to reduce production costs is to create less waste. Both buying too many materials, and throwing away scraps that could be sold, add up to increased production costs.

3. Increase production. Work faster or make more products at a time.

4. Make more sales. This means do more shows, or better shows, or make additional sales to other outlets.

5. Reduce overhead. Turn off the lights when you go out. One good helper is better than three not-good helpers. Keep the entire business production based in your garage.

 

More Craft Fair Tips

Selling directly to the user of your product will help you find out what the public wants.  Even if you eventually want to market your products by selling wholesale to craft galleries, you can test your product by doing craft fairs.  Of course, you can make a good living doing only craft fairs.

 

Before the show

þ Make a checklist of show necessities.

Check your list just before you leave home. There is a craft fair equipment list spreadsheet on page 83.

 

A sample list of show necessities:

Gift boxes

Hang tags

Bags

Blank notepads

VISA machine, thermal paper, and charger

VISA signage

Calculator

Sample of work in progress

Banner

Stakes

Booth sign

Statement of purpose (artist’s statement)

Price stickers

Duct tape

Rope

Pocket knife

 

 

Other handy stuff:

Phone charger

Camera, card, and batteries

Umbrella/raincoat

Mosquito repellant

Hand cleanser

Garbage bags (for end of the show clean-up)

Toilet paper (if the porta-Johns are out)

Gloves (for tire changing, etc.)

þ Call ahead if you are going to be late.

Otherwise, the promoter might give your space away.

 

 

Setting up for the show

þ Use a combination stool/tool box for tools.

If you dedicate a set of tools for shows, and keep them in a combination stool/toolbox, you will always have the tool you need and the stool also helps you put up walls, curtains, and lights at the show.

þ

 

Use a hand truck with large tires for easy loading.

Big wheels roll over cracks better.  Magline carts are the best hand trucks. They have big wheels, 2 or 4 wheel positions and hold up to 800 lbs. Priority Supply Company, 2127 Lake Lansing, Michigan 48912   (517) 374-8573.  

þ Never put tape on the legs of your E-Z UP.

The sticky residue left will prevent you from closing it down after the show.

þ Raise your canopy to its full height.   

Your booth will be more inviting and easier for tall people to get into. It lets in more light.  If you roll up your walls, put them on before raising the canopy. Use a lower height when it is windy or raining. It will keep some of the rain out and offer less wind resistance.

 

During the show

þ Be in your booth early.

If you spend 60 minutes in your booth before the show is open, ready to help customers, and stay open a little longer in the evening, it adds up to four extra hours in a three day show. Or, one extra show for every six shows, at no extra cost to you. This applies to unfenced outdoor shows.

þ

 

Show your customers what you start with.

A raw material in the hand is worth a thousand words—show a block of laminated wood, bag of clay, carving wax, etc.

þ Get a 50% deposit for custom work.

Full payment in advance is even better.

þ Never charge extra for gift boxes, etc.

The customer will think you are cheap and resent the charge. Customers like the word “free.”

þ Never criticize other craftspeople.

Nothing looks more unprofessional to customers or other craftspeople.

 

þ Give a small price break for multiple purchases.

Customers think they can get a better price if they are buying directly from the artist. But you have to be firm. You might be dealing with a “flea market” personality, someone who never ever pays full price. Ten percent is a reasonable amount for three or more items. Don’t offer it unless you think it might encourage them to buy. If your first reasonable discount offer is rejected, don’t make another. Explain again why your product is better.

þ

 

Never sell seconds.

They will come back to haunt you, especially if your customer gives them to someone else, who doesn’t know they are seconds, and brings them back to you to fix. It is better to have the “Everything I sell is perfect.” mentality. People don’t want flawed items for gifts.

þ Don’t use “Sale” signs at a fair.  

The public expects that the price asked reflects the artist’s time and materials. If items are on sale, you have to explain why. Many promoters forbid sale signs.

þ Start a mailing list.

 

 

At shows, collect names and addresses with a guest book, which is a nice address book or notebook, with large spaces for the customer to write big.  Copy into a database (there is one for Excel on page 87) all addresses from both the guest book and the checks you receive. Someday you will have a huge mailing list. At least once a year, send a postcard to everyone on your list, with information about your shows, web site, or new products.

þ Make your own guest book.

Print headings for name, address, phone, and email, horizontally on a sheet of paper, and have Kinko’s copy it and make a book for you, or put the copies in a 3-ring  binder.

þ Keep your display out of the aisles.

Don’t put anything in front of your booth, and don’t sit in the aisle, as it restricts the flow of traffic to the booth next to you.

þ Ask people what they think of your new items.

Do they like the color, the price, shape, etc.? Pay close attention to their comments. This type of feedback is one of the great advantages of doing a retail craft fair or art show.

þ Floor coverings make everyone more comfortable.

A 4’x 6’ oriental rug in darker colors will make your booth look more elegant and make your feet less tired at the end of the day. Tape the front edge.

 

þ Always fill out the show survey.

It is the best way to get the promoters to improve the show. Don’t just write your complaints.  Give helpful suggestions on how to improve the show. If they don’t know what is wrong, how can they fix it?

þ Don’t rush to pack up after a show ends.

After 45 minutes, 75 percent of the other artists will be gone and out of your way.  In addition, you might make a few more sales from latecomers. If you rush to get home after a show when you are tired, you are more likely to have an accident.

 

Avoiding theft

þ

 

Keep valuables out of reach.

Thieves will reach under your table or in from the back of your booth. Put your purse or camera out of sight in a rubbermaid or a large trunk. Attach your purse strap to a chair leg, table leg, canopy leg, etc. Purse-snatchers at fairs are looking for a purse that is unattached.

þ Don’t use a cash box.

Keep your money (at least all paper money) on your body, in a pocket, in a fanny pack, etc.  You can keep coins, but not bills, in a simple box for sales tax change.  It will make noise if it is stolen.

þ Separate large bills from small bills.

Don’t keep your money all in one place. Keep large bills in a separate safe place that is harder to access, a different pocket, etc. This keeps you from accidentally giving someone big bills with their change, or spilling the money on the ground.

þ You are more vulnerable to theft when packing up.

You are separated from your stuff when going to the car, and again when the stuff is in the car and you are back at the booth. Ask your neighbor to keep an eye on your booth.  Lock your car doors anytime valuables are inside.

þ Use a locked storage box or trunk.

A Contico fiberglass wheeled foot-locker can be locked in your booth with a padlock and bike chain attached to your table or something heavy. Put things like your credit card machine and calculator in it for overnight storage. If a drunk or prankster gets in your booth at night, they probably won’t try to get into it.

 

Health

þ At the first sign of a cold, take lots of vitamin C.

3,000 mgs a day should keep the cold at bay. Also take a multiple vitamin every day. Aspirin is known to reduce strokes and heart attacks.

þ Mercury vapor lighting can cause migraines.

These lights can also cause a green tinge in your booth. Use your own halogen lights to improve your lighting. Bring aspirins or Tylenol.

þ Do yoga stretches to avoid a bad back
 
þ Drink lots of water during a show.

Dehydration will cause headaches and soreness. Water also helps to combat the low humidity of indoor shows.  Don’t drink a lot of coffee unless you have a porta-John nearby.

 

 

 

 

Albuquerque Balloon Festival

 

 

 

 

List of Promoters of Multiple Craft Shows

 

Send all of the promoters in your area of the country a letter asking for information or an application.  Many of them screen (jury) you only once, then if they like your products, you can do as many of their shows as you want without being re-screened for each show.

 

 

PROMOTER ADDRESS CITY ST ZIP PHONE # OF SHOWS

DeSoto Caverns Park 5181 DeSoto Caverns Pkwy. Childersburg AL 35044 800-933-2283 2 outdoor

Elise Blackwell 116 Al-Jo Curve Selma AL 36701 334-874-8044 1 indoor, 2 outdoor

Hillbilly Corner Arts, Crafts, and Antiq 22530 Deer Run Rd. Hindsville AR 72738 501-789-5726 2 indoor, 2 outdoor

Fourth Avenue Merchants Assoc. 329 East 7th Street Tucson AZ 85705 520-624-5004 2 outdoor

Magic Bird Promotions P. O. Box 1803 Cave Creek AZ 85327 480-488-2014 1 indoor, 8 outdoor

Mill Ave. Merch. Association P. O. Box 53046 Phoenix AZ 85072 480-967-4877 4 outdoor

Mountain Artists Guild P. O. Box 12920 Prescott AZ 86304 520-445-2510 2 outdoor

The Events Group P. O. Box 328 Tempe AZ 85280 602-968-5353 5 outdoor

Thunderbird Artists 15648 N. Eagles Nest Dr. Fountain Hills AZ 85268 480-837-5637 7 outdoor

Beckmans Gift Show P. O. Box 2337 Los Angeles CA 90027 323-962-5424 4 indoor

California Artists P. O. Box 1963 Burlingame CA 94011 650-348-7699 15 outdoor

Clovis Chamber of Commerce 325 Pollasky Ave Clovis CA 93612 559-299-7273 3 indoor

Custom Productions P. O. Box 800524 Santa Clarita CA 91350 661-297-0119 1 indoor, 5 outdoor

Eckerstrom Productions 5151 Cold Springs Drive Forest Hill CA 95631 530-367-4557 10 outdoor

Hartman Studios P. O. Box 70160 Point Richmond CA 94807 510-970-3217 4 outdoor

Harvest Festival 601 North McDowell Blvd Petaluma CA 94954 707-778-6300 15 indoor

Jan Etre Presents P. O. Box 9188 Berkeley CA 94709 510-526-7363 1outdoor, 1 indoor

MLA Productions 1384 Weston Rd. Scotts Valley CA 95066 831-438-4751 3 outdoor

Pacific Fine Arts P. O. Box 280 Pine Grove CA 95665 209-296-1195 12 outdoor

Piecemaker Country Store 1720 Adams Ave. Costa Mesa CA 92626 714-691-3112 4 outdoor

R.G. Canning Attractions P. O. Box 400 Maywood CA 90270 310-835-9370 24 outdoor

Ray Leier 3051 Via Maderas Altadena CA 91001 626-797-6803 6 outdoor

Sandpiper Prod. P. O. Box S-3053 Carmel CA 93921 831-620-1281 2 outdoor

Scenic Art Shows P. O. Box 485 Chino CA 91708 909-623-5977 4 outdoor

Show Biz Productions 16520 Harbor Blvd. #D-2 Fountain Valley CA 92708 714-418-2000 4-6 indoor

Steve Powers and Company P. O. Box 1610 Pismo Beach CA 93448 805-481-7100 8 indoor

Village Artisans P. O. Box 1448 Bakersfield CA 93302 661-328-1943 2 indoor

West Coast Artists P. O. Box 4389 Chatsworth CA 91311 818-709-2907 22 outdoor

West Fest Productions 100 So. Sunrise Way #145 Palm Springs CA 92262 760-321-2148 20 outdoor

Adams County Historical Society 9601 Henderson Rd. Brighton CO 80601 303-659-7103 3 indoor

Chun Capital Hill People's Fair 1490 Lafayette St. #104 Denver CO 80218 303-830-1651 1 outdoor

Cortez Area C C P. O. Box 968 Cortez CO 81321 970-565-3414 2 outdoor

Denver Merchandise Mart 451 E. 58th Ave. #470 Denver CO 80216 303-292-6278 2 indoor

Downtown Denver Partnership 511 16th St. #200 Denver CO 80202 303-295-6330 3 outdoor

J&J Promotions 8490 W. Colfax Ave. Box 33 Lakewood CO 80215 303-232-7147 3 indoor

Keystone Art Festival P. O. Box 38 Keystone CO 80435 970-496-4570 1 outdoor

Howard Allan Events Ltd. 9695 W. Broward Blvd. Plantation FL 33324 954-472-3755 40 outdoor

Monticello-Jefferson C of  C 290 North Jefferson St. Monticello FL 32344 850-997-5552 2 outdoor

The Handmade in America Show 251 Creekside Dr. St. Augustine FL 32086 904-797-2600 20-30

United Production 125 5th Ave. N. Safety Harbor FL 34695 727-725-1562 4 outdoor

University of So. Fla. Bull Market 4202 E. Fowler Ave. Tampa FL 33620 813-974-5309 weekly

Andersonville Gld. P. O. Box 6 Andersonville GA 31711 912-924-2558 2 indoor

Blue Ridge Mountains Arts  P. O. Box 1016 Blue Ridge GA 30513 706-632-2144 2 outdoor

Contemporary Crafts Market 1142 Auahi St. #A7-2820 Honolulu HI 96814 808-422-7362 3 indoor

(in CA)

Downtown Davenport Assn. 102 So. Harrison St. Davenport IA 52801 319-322-6268 4 outdoor

Festivals International 508 4th Ave. No., Clearlake IA 50428 515-357-5177 2 indoor, 4 outdoor

Personalized Wood Products P. O. Box 193 Amana IA 52203 319-622-3100 2 outdoor

Buhl Chamber of Commerce 716 Hwy. 30 East Guhl ID 83316 208-543-6682 2 outdoor

American Society of Artists P. O. Box 1326 Palatine IL 60078 312-751-2500 12 indoor, 15 outdoor

Craft Show Promotions Inc. 302 Allen Ave. West Chicago IL 60186 630-293-3637 3 indoor, 9 outdoor

Bright Star Promotions 3428 Hill Vale Rd. Louisville KY 40241 502-423-STAR 20 indoor

Steinhauer Productions 16471 Hwy 40 Folsom LA 70437 504-796-5853 15 indoor, 2 outdoor

Artisan Promotions. 83 Mt. Vernon St. Boston MA 2108 617-742-3973 3 indoor

Americana Arts and Crafts 15 Cypress Street Hagerstown MD 21742 301-791-2346 7 outdoor

Buyers Market of American Craft 3000 Chestnut Ave. #300 Baltimore MD 21211 410-889-2933 2 indoor

Sugerloaf Mountain Works 200 Orchard Ridge Dr., #21 Gaithersburg MD 20878 301-990-1400 8 indoors

White Oak Plaza Merchants 923 So. 7 Hwy. Blue Springs MO 64015 816-118-6620 4 indoors

Forest Grove Community Club P. O. Box 16 Forest Grove MT 59411 406-538-8348 2 indoors, 1 outdoors

Lewiston C. of Commerce P. O. Box 818 Lewistown MT 59457 538-5436 2 outdooor

Bele Chere Festival P. O. Box 7148 Ashville NC 28802 828-259-5800 3 outdoor

High Country Art & Craft Guild P. O. Box 2854 Asheville NC 28802 828-254-0072 11 indoor, 1 outdoor

Downtown Comm P. O. Box 962 Fargo ND 58107 701-241-1570 1 in, 1 out

Huffman Productions Inc. P. O. Box 184 Boys Town NE 68010 402-331-2889 9 indoor

Kimberly Ann Kreations RR1 Box 200 Hoskins, NE 68740 402-565-4583 2 indoor

A.C. A. C. P. O. Box 650 Montclair NJ 7042 973-746-0091 6 outdoor

Rose Squared Inc. 12 Galaxy Ct. Belle Mead NJ 8502 908-874-5247 8 outdoor

Lovington Chamber of C. 201 S. Main Lovington NM 88260 505-396-5311 2 indoor-outdoor

Mill Museum P. O. Box 287 Cleveland NM 87115 505-387-2645 2 in/outdoor

The Walker Organization 3340 Wynn Rd. Suite D Las Vegas NV 89102 702-364-1174 3 indoor

Williams, Ltd. 4790 Caughlin Pkwy., #507 Reno NV 89509 775-324-6435 5 indooor, 25 outdoor

American Arts & Crafts Alliance 45 Riverside Drive #15H New York NY 10025 212-866-2239 3 outdoor, 2 indoor

American Craft Council 21 South Eltings Corner Rd Highland NY 12561 800-836-3470 7 indoor

Artrider Productions P. O. Box 28 Woodstock NY 12498 914-331-7900 8 indoor, 1 outdoor

Cord Shows, Ltd. 4 Whipporwill Lane Armonk NY 10504 914-273-4667 2 indoor, 2 outdoor

Designer Arts 114 Mill Road Red Hook NY 12571 800-660-1045 5 indoor

George Little Management Ten Bank Street White Plains NY 10606 914-421-3206 5 indoor

Soho Antiques Fair & Crafts P. O. Box 337 Garden City NY 11530 212-682-2000 52 weeks a year

Washington Sq. Outdoor Art 115 East 9th St. #7C NY NY 10003 212-982-6255 2 outdoor

Raab Enterprises P. O. Box 33428 N. Royalton OH 44133 440-237-3424 30 indoor

Tom Danner Event Mgmt. P. O. Box 1473 Marion OH 43302 740-389-5707 2 indoor

Benton County Fairgrounds 110 SW 53rd St. Corvallis OR 97333 541-757-1521 6 indoor, 1 outdoor

Brookings Chamber P. O. Box 940 Brookings OR 97415 541-469-3181 1 indoor, 1 outdoor

Eugene Sat, Mkt.  76 W. Broadway Eugene OR 97401 541-686-8885 14 in/35 out

Jefferson County Fair P. O. Box 237 Madras OR 97741 541-475-4460 2 indoors

Oregon Homecrafters  P. O. Box 70333 Eugene OR 97401 541-343-6856 5 indoors

Rogue Valley  P. O. Box 4041 Medford OR 97501 888-826-9868 weekly

Sisters Area C of C P. O. Box 430 Sisters OR 97759 541-549-0251 1 indoors, 4 outdoors

Umatilla County Fair P. O. Box 94 Hermiston OR 97838 541-567-8115 1 indoors, 1 outdoors

Umpqa Valley Arts Association P. O. Box 1105 Roseburg OR 97470 541-672-2532 2 indoors, 2 outdoors

BJ Promotions Belle Shilling RR#1, Box 1772 Union Dale PA 18470 570-679-3670 40 indoors

Heritage Markets P. O. Box 389 Carlisle PA 17013 717-249-9404 15 indoors

Renaissance Craftables 541 Woodland Dr. Radnor PA 19087 610-687-8535 4 indoors, 4 outdoors

Country Fairs 6311 So. Canyon Rd. Rapid City SD 57702 605-343-8783 5 indoors, 1 outdoors

Festival in the Park P. O. Box 648 Spearfish SD 57783 605-642-2311 1 indoors, 1 outdoors

Esau, Inc. P. O. Box 50096 Knoxville TN 37950 865-588-1233 2 indoors

Tennessee Assoc of Craft Artists P. O. Box 120066 Nashville TN 37212 615-665-0502 3 outdoors

American Country Shows P. O. Box 1129 Fredericks-burg TX 78624 830-997-2774 25 indoors

Art Promotion Counselors P. O. Box 776 Alamo TX 78516 956-787-6996 30-40 indoors

Events Mgmt. Group, Inc. P. O. Box 8845 Virginia Beach VA 23450 757-486-0220 3 indoor

Craft Producers P. O. Box 300 Charlotte VT 5445 802-425-3399 3 indoors, 9 outdoors

Jim Custer Enterprises, Inc. P. O. Box 14987 Spokane</